August 2014


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How to get all the mood-boosting benefits of an awesome getaway—minus the huge price tag

Need a happiness boost? Get out of town! No, seriously. The further you are from home, the happier your tweets tend to be, according to a new study from the University of Vermont.

To read the full article The Random Thing That Boosts Your Happiness, click here.

vitDkirk110x170.jpgWomen who had sufficient amounts of vitamin D were 32 percent less likely to develop fibroids than women with insufficient vitamin D, according to a study from researchers at the National Institutes of Health.

To read the full article Vitamin D May Reduce Risk of Uterine Fibroids, click here.

stomach-pain170x136.jpgWomen who have been abused and who experience strong mood changes in tandem with their menstrual cycle also feel pain more acutely than other women, according to new research.

To read the full article Some Women Feel More Pain, click here.

chocolate-DM146x170.jpgCraving chocolate, but not sure if you should indulge? The American Diabetes Association (ADA) says it’s OK to give into temptation every once in a while even if you are diabetic. Consider these healthier ways to satisfy your taste for this treat without sabotaging your blood sugar control.

To read the full article Chocolate and Diabetes, click here.

marinol170x160.jpgA pill form of marijuana may work just as well to relieve pain as the smoked form, but with fewer side effects, new research suggests.

In the study, people who either smoked marijuana or took the drug dronabinol — a pill that contains the active ingredient of marijuana — were able to hold their hands in a bath of ice water (showing that they could tolerate the pain of the cold temperature) for longer than participants who took a placebo.

To read the full article Marijuana Pill May Be Better for Pain, click here.

dental170x160Too Poor for Dental Care Robs Wife of Husband's Kiss

Val Crosby has been unable to kiss her husband for a year. A degenerative disease has rotted her teeth down to the gums, and they cannot afford dental care in their isolated pocket of Tennessee.

To read the full story Too Poor for Dental Care Robs Wife of Husband's Kiss, click here.

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Walking May Be Just As Effective As Running For Bringing Heart Benefits


If you're a runner, a new study suggests you may be able to slow down and still gain the same health benefits.

A study of almost 50,000 Americans finds brisk walking can be just as effective at reducing heart health risks like high blood pressure and cholesterol as going on a full-speed run.

To read the full story Walking May Be Just As Effective As Running For Bringing Heart Benefits, click here.

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Lead Poisoning Rates Rise in U.S. After CDC Lowers Blood Cutoff

More than half a million U.S. children are now believed to have lead poisoning, roughly twice the previous high estimate, health officials reported Thursday.

The increase is the result of the government last year lowering the threshold for lead poisoning, so now more children are considered at risk.

To read the full story Lead Poisoning Rates Rise in U.S. After CDC Lowers Blood Cutoff, click

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Food as Medicine? What to Make of the Claims

Many Foods Are Pitched as Being Healing. It Might Be Best to Focus on Healthful Food, and Start with Real Food.

What's a healthful food and what's a healing food? Is there a difference? At least since the mid-19th century, when the Battle Creek Sanitarium opened its doors and people flocked there to follow John Harvey Kellogg's regime of whole grains, nuts and frequent enemas, many Americans have sought food as medicine.


To read the full story Food as Medicine? What to Make of the Claims, click here.

whole-graincereals130x170Whole Truth About Which Whole-Grain Foods Are Best

"Whole grain" has become a healthy eating buzz phrase, and food companies aren't shy about using it to entice us to buy products. Browse the bread, cereal or chip aisles of your favorite grocery store, and you'll see the upsell.


To read the full story Whole Truth About Which Whole-Grain Foods Are Best, click here.

tired-all-the-time140x170.jpgDo you often feel tired during the day? Have you ever fallen asleep at an inopportune time? It could be that you aren’t getting the proper amount of sleep each night. If you are getting less than 7-8 hours of sleep each day, chances are you are suffering from sleep deprivation.

To read the full article When You Are Tired Of Being Tired, click here.

osteoporosispain110x170.jpgNew ESCEO and IOF Guidance highlights new risk assessment and treatment strategies; points to high prevalence of fractures and low rates of diagnosis and treatment in Europe

To read the full article Diagnosis & Management Of Osteoporosis In Postmenopausal Women: Newly Published European Guidance, click here.

bodyfat170x170.jpgMenopause does not cause weight gain, but it does increase belly fat, according to a new study.

"It is a myth that the menopause causes a woman to gain weight. It's really just a consequence of environmental factors and aging that cause that," study leader Susan Davis, a professor at Monash University in Australia, said in an International Menopause Society news release.

To read the full article Menopause Won't Spur Weight Gain, But May Boost Belly Fat: Review, click here.

sick-old-lady170x160.jpgDeveloping Gender-Specific Medicine Is a Major Challenge of the Future

Recent research in laboratory medicine has revealed crucial differences between men and women with regard to cardiovascular illness, cancer, liver disease, osteoporosis, and in the area of pharmacology.

To read the full article Men and Women Get Sick in Different Ways: Developing Gender-Specific Medicine Is a Major Challenge of the Future, click here.

arthritis114x170.jpgPost-menopausal women, who often suffer from joint pain, could find some long-term relief by taking estrogen-only medication, according to a new study based on the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) that was released online today by the journal, Menopause.

To read the full article Estrogen May Relieve Post-Menopausal Joint Pain, Study Suggests, click here.

Happy-Old-Couple170x150.jpgThere's been some discussion in the news lately about the new definition of old, and what to call someone who's over 60. It seems that referring to adults as elderly, old or older can sound wrong, regardless of how accurate it is.

To read the full article The Pre-Empt Chronicles: How To Age Happier, click here.

healthpet140x170.jpgThe same bad health habits that affect people can affect pets, too. Knowing this can be a real motivator to make over your lifestyle. Which unhealthy human habits harm your cat or pup the most?

To read the full article How Your Health Habits Affect Your Pet, click here.

freinds170x100.jpgDoes the saying "A friend in need is a friend indeed" mean that a person who stands by you when you need them is a true friend? Or, does it mean that someone who needs your help is eager to prove their friendship?


To read the full article Friendship: Close Ties That Enhance, Extend Life, click here.

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Spring is just around the corner, but don’t be surprised to see winter weather – and viruses – linger a little longer. So what’s behind your stuffy nose: Spring allergies or a cold?

To read the full article Cold or Allergies: How to Tell, click here.

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Get the facts about the Affordable Care Act with these educational fact sheets from AARP's department of Education & Outreach.

To read the full article Health Care Law Fact Sheets, click here.

Meditation-Benefits-160x170.jpgMeditation Benefits A Person Mentally, Physically And Spiritually.

It’s fairly well-known that one of the major meditation benefits this alternative healing practice provides is an outlet to relaxation and stress reduction.

To read the full article A Look at Meditation Benefits, click here.

Fallinlove160x170.jpgA 4-part series, see the other parts... Want to fall in love with your partner all over again? Wish the two of you could have more fun together, feel more connected, increase your passion or create the perfect date nights?

To read the full article How to Fall in Love With Your Spouse Again, click here
breastcancer170x160.jpgOmega-3s Inhibit Breast Cancer Tumor Growth

A lifelong diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids can inhibit growth of breast cancer tumours by 30 per cent, according to new research from the University of Guelph.

To read the full article Omega-3s Inhibit Breast Cancer Tumor Growth, Study Finds, click here.
cooking130x170.jpgBoost your kitchen confidence and make cooking more fun with awesome cooking courses around the country. Give a man a fish and he’ll eat for a day. But teach a woman to cook and she’ll eat well for a lifetime. It’s true: cooking classes can actually improve your diet and boost your kitchen confidence.

To read the full article The 9 Quirkiest Cooking Classes in America, click here.
doless160x170.jpg4 Sneaky Ways to Boost Your Productivity—And Prevent Burnout

If you clock in long workdays to chip away at your never-ending to-do list, you’re not alone. But the key to getting things done—without burning out—is to work fewer, more productive hours, according to a recent article in The New York Times.

To read the full article Do Less, Achieve More, click here.
seniorscards112x170When older people's mood improves, so does their brain power, new research suggests.

Being in a good mood appears to enhance decision-making skills and working memory among older adults, according to the study published in the current issue of the journal Cognition and Emotion.

To read the full article A Good Mood May Boost Seniors' Brain Power, click here.
Backpain-140x170What will help your back pain? There are a lot of choices.

Your best plan depends on your specific case. For instance, has your back been hurting for a couple of days, or a long time? Did it start with an obvious injury, or are you not really sure what happened? Are you basically healthy, or do you have other conditions, like diabetes or arthritis, to consider, too?

To read the full article Find the Right Treatment for Your Back Pain, click here.
bloodpressure170x130What is high blood pressure? See how much you really know about this silent killer. This is an 8 question self quiz to test your knowledge of high blood pressure.

To read the full article How High Is Your Blood Pressure IQ?, click here.
mintleaves170x134Studies have shown peppermint oil to be fairly effective at relieving irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a collection of symptoms that includes abdominal pain and cramping, bloating, constipation and diarrhea that affects 5 to 20 percent of the population.

To read the full article The Power of Peppermint, click here.
medical-breakthroughs170x130Grow-your-own organs, bionic eyes and more life-changing innovations. Imagine fighting cancer with a vaccine. Or treating depression with a magnet. Or even growing a new liver or bladder using cells from your existing organs.

To read the full article Amazing Medical Discoveries, click here.
sleep-10-170x170.jpgSlide Show: Sleep better once you learn the lies behind the following sleep myths

To read the full article Get More Sleep: 10 Sleep Myths Busted, click here.
burnoutwoman130x170.jpgEmotional exhaustion and physical and cognitive fatigue are signs of burnout, often caused by prolonged exposure to stress. Burnout can cause negative health effects including poor sleep, depression, anxiety, and cardiovascular and immune disorders.

To read the full article Burnout In Middle-Aged Women, click here.
muscleloss130x170.jpgNew review by International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) Nutrition Working Group examines role of nutrition in sarcopenia, with focus on protein, vitamins D and B, and acid-based diet.

To read the full article Which Nutritional Factors Help Preserve Muscle Mass, Strength and Performance in Seniors?, click here.
breastcancerdna130x70.jpgMedical researchers at the University of Alberta tested the DNA of more than 300 women in Alberta and discovered a 'genetic marker' method to help accurately profile which women were more apt to have their breast cancer return years later.

To read the full article DNA Marker Predicts Breast Cancer Recurrence, click here.
newdrug100x170.jpgResearch led by Dr. Suresh Alahari, the Fred Brazda Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans and its Stanley S. Scott Cancer Center, details exactly how the Her2 cancer gene promotes the progression and spread of breast cancer cells.

To read the full article New Drug Target for Her-2 Related Breast Cancer, click here.
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Do you visit Dr. Google more than you do your MD? You’re not alone. In the past year, about 35 percent of Americans have gone online to diagnose themselves or others, according to a new survey from The Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project.

To read the full article The Danger in Googling Your Symptoms, click here.

exercise-couple-110x170.jpgNew research reveals that walking at least three hours a week reduces the risk of stroke among women.

To read the full article Walking Reduces Stroke Risk Among Women, click here.

dryskin130x130.jpgThroughout the winter, excessive hand washing to prevent the spread of germs can leave skin extremely dry and itchy. 

To read the full article Tips to Avoid Dry Skin During Winter, click here.

FatherChild130x170.jpgCan a father's mental health affect his unborn child? New research suggests it can.

To read the full article Father-Child Connection, click here.

anger130x170.jpgCan losing your cool be good for you? According to a new German study, people who express their anger live two years longer, on average, than those who bottle up their rage.

 

To read the full article Get Angry and Live Longer?, click here.

Memories2-170x150.jpgMem'ries: Where Did I Put My Keys? Walt Handelsman's Toons

Admit it: You've searched high and low for the eyeglasses that are already on your head; you've groped for the forgotten name; and you've had the mystifying experience of standing in your closet wondering, "Why did I come in here?"

To read the full article Mem'ries: Where Did I Put My Keys?, click here.

ALLLRLFormal902-1b.jpgIf you are anything like me, you are likely in a bit of shock and a bit excited about the arrival of 2013 and the New Year. In many cultures the coming of the New Year offers opportunity and challenges to change, to grow, to resolve past conflicts and problems and then to be able to move forward in life. The coming of the New Years not only opens the door to new opportunities, it now allows us to correct old negative issues, and then to start afresh and create either a new direction in life or firm up and solidify changes that you have already been made so that the coming year is even better than the past year.

My last year was terrific. Of course, it was not without its positives and negatives, its challenges and opportunities to grow and evolve. I spent a great portion of the past year writing and working on completion and publication of six books. Three were old books written in the 1990's but to renew them my wife Lisa and I spent a great deal of time reviewing and updating them so they are now current. Five have already been published as e-books on Amazon and Smashwords. Three will be printed and will soon be available on their own websites as well as a number of our other web sites and book stores across America.

As if this was in itself a triumph, not to mention enough work, we plan to publish at least six more books by mid 2013. These books will include our work on how stress, not just the common garden variety of stress, but stress occurring from our inability to resolve long term conflicts, are the cause of nearly 70% to 80% of all illness seen in medical practice. In When Your Body Talks, Listen! we tell readers how chronic recurrent stress, stresses that we often are unaware exists, can and frequently does lead to illness. What is most important is that these Stress-Related Disorders, are not just minor illnesses, but they are illness that can be recognized early and if treated correctly can lead to full reversal of illness and a complete cure of all their associated health risks. Even more important, and best of all, by resolving these unresolved conflicts we can stop and even reverse the process which has been set lose and if not appropriately resolved may lead to not just to acute illness or disease, but ultimately to chronic disease, life-changing disabilities and most disastrous of all, premature death.

In the last stages of editing is the sequel to When Your Body Talks, Listen!, When Your Body Talks, Heal It! In this book we take the information and understanding created in When Your Body Talks, Listen! and we use this information to stop, reverse, undo and heal illnesses that were once thought to be incurable. In both of these books we move farther forward than any other book on either stress or healing currently available. The goal of both of these books is not to just look at Stress-Related Disorders and the problems they cause us, but to look at them as a cause of illness, so that we can activate our many defensive and protective systems which our body has built into it so that we can protect and heal ourselves. So that we can take power of ver our body and learn how to direct these built-in defensive and protective systems so that they work for us 100% of the time so that we 1) do not become ill, 2) can heal any and all illnesses that take root within us.

We also will release a series of three books on an ancient Hawaiian healing system called Hunā which in Hawaiian means “the Secret.” When the missionaries came to Hawaii, they were introduced to a very sophisticated healing system which they totally misunderstood. In the mid to late 1800's illness was still a grand enigma to everyone. Bacteria had just been recognized but were still not clearly understood, genetics was not yet a part of medicine, and surgery was still at very best very primitive, yet, the Hawaiians were rarely, if ever ill. The missionaries concentrating on bringing God to the heathens entirely missed the sophistication of Hawaiian medicine. The Hawaiians, who for the most part, were unaware of the Western medical system and the meaning of their wellness, were put into a situation in which they were unable to explain what they did to create wellness and healing. This combination of events created an additional situation where those who benefitted were unable to teach what they did to create and maintain wellness and those that sorely needed this valuable information were unable to recognize a system that was in many ways light-years ahead of what they believed was the best available to them.

Since the early 20th century scholars and healers have studied the Hawaiian system, some have embraced it while others labeled it by a host of epithetic names such as primitive, shamanistic, heretic, even witchcraft. Yet, the Hawaiian system works and it works quite well, it also works in the 21st century as our New Year downs. In fact it is possible that when made a part of mainstream medicine, it may become more meaningful and important than ever before.

One very important aspect of Huna is Huna Prayer. In many ways much like Christian prayer, Huna Prayer offers individuals the ability to make contact with his or her personal deity, but it goes considerably farther as it offers a system, a formula, that can increase the opportunity and likelihood to get everything you want, need and ask for.

Huna is neither a religion nor a religious system, hence it not only does not compete with your personal religion, but in fact, will help you to understand more about your religion. Huna is at the root of most secrete teachings that form the basis of not only Christianity, but also Judaism, Muslimism, Buddhism and virtually every other religion. While outwardly each of these religions generally appears to have significant differences, Huna explains the root teachings in a way that allows the student and searchers to fully understand and hence embrace the true essence of their religion. Hence, Huna neither competes with nor is in conflict with your personal religious views, instead it adds to and may even help you better understand what many of the deepest teachings of your religion really mean.

In this series of three books, the first book starts with basic review of the New and Old Testament in order to demonstrate how they are influenced by Huna directly or indirectly. Even today many Hawaiians believe that Jesus spent time in Hawaii and studied with ancient Kahuna (the keepers of the Secret). While there is no solid proof that Jesus was ever in Hawaii, one only has to look at Huna in relationship to what Jesus tells us in the New Testament to recognize that these parallel closely to what Huna masters taught and what Jesus told his disciples. Only then it is clear that there is likely a meaningful relationship between Huna and Christianity.

In February 2013, we will begin a series of lectures and programs discussing and reviewing how stress leads to illness, how illness no matter its cause can be healed. In this series we will look at how illness starts, how it takes hold, and then the steps you can use to not only stop your illness where it is, but if you so desire reverse and eliminate it.

Stay tuned to our websites so that you will soon get a complete schedule of these programs, then come join us and heal your self.

Lisa and I not only wish you a happy and healthy New Year, we also offer to teach each of you how to make it the healthiest and most healing year of your life.
seniorpain114x170.jpgHere’s an excuse to stay in bed this weekend with zero guilt: Logging extra hours of sleep can reduce pain sensitivity and increase daytime alertness, according to a new study soon to be published in the journal SLEEP.

To read the full story 9 Natural Pain Relievers, click here.
LegCramps150x170.jpgIt’s happened to practically everyone: A sudden, painful cramp in your leg or foot startles you awake in the middle of the night. Studies suggest that one-third to one-half of people over 60 get these involuntary muscle contractions on a regular basis, and their frequency may increase with age. Lasting anywhere from a few seconds to several excruciating minutes, cramps occur when irritated nerves send muscles a signal to repeatedly contract.

To read the full story Kick Leg Cramps, click here.
VitaminsAtoZ150x170.jpgThe best way to get crucial vitamins and minerals is by eating the right balance of healthy foods. But for people over age 50, even the best diet may not provide enough of some important nutrients. "How many of us can claim to be getting the full complement of what we need from our diet each day?" asks Meir Stampfer, M.D., professor of nutrition and epidemiology at Harvard University.

To read the full story Vitamins From A to Z, click here.
therapy150x170.jpgAmong patients who don't respond to antidepressants, adding talk therapy to their prescription appears to ease depressive symptoms, a new study found.

In a randomized controlled trial, adding cognitive behavioral therapy or CBT to drug therapy was associated with a more than threefold increased likelihood of response to treatment after six months, Dr. Nicola Wiles of the University of Bristol in England and colleagues reported online in The Lancet.

To read the full story Talk Therapy Boosts Response to Antidepressants, click here.
optimism150x170.jpgA resilient attitude may be the secret to successful aging, perhaps even trumping good physical health, finds a new study.

Researchers surveyed 1,006 randomly selected adults in San Diego, Calif., between the ages of 50 and 99 (with a mean age of about 77) through a 25-minute phone interview, followed by a mail-in survey. In addition to evaluating the participants' physical health conditions, such as chronic disease and disability, the survey looked at more subjective factors like adults' social engagement and self-assessments of their overall health and degree of successful aging.

To read the full story Optimism Is Key to Successful Aging, click here.

preventioncouple 163x170.jpgPrevention, Screening and The Real Story

Medical journals, newspapers and TV news reports publish story after story about advice that people can wait longer periods of time to have cancer screening tests. These articles often suggest that regular screening and preventive testings can be postponed for years, or even entirely avoided for both men and women.

Sadly there is another truth, one not often seen or presented as part of these stories. In recent years you may well remember reading stories regarding the practical risks and lack of benefits now being attributed to yearly routine cancer screening tests. The Annual Pap Smear was a regular event. Most women would go annually to see their primary care medical doctor or their gynecologist for a pap smear, breast exam and referral for their annual mammogram. Now the media tells us that prestigious medical committees or organizations are publishing studies that tell women that it is perfectly acceptable to put off these exams for two, three or even five years.

While it is hard to argue with studies done by major organizations and experts, is it really the right thing to do for you? In recent years the medical professionals, have told women that breast-self exam is useless, mammography and pap smears may lead to expensive and even unnecessary painful and even dangerous post testing, false positive and bring more fear into the lives of women who participate. Each of these articles almost always contain a statement of how putting off these routine procedures can save dollars. The assumption is that it reduces health care costs, but with health care organizations making record profits, and since health care costs have not really dropped significantly, I often question where the money saved actually goes?

As a physician I want to listen to and value these studies. Most of these studies at least on the surface appear to be well done and offer some value. However, my practical reality of day-to-day medical practice and years of experience in dealing with people and not just numbers, leaves me screaming inside as to the damage these new recommendations could end up doing.

These new recommendations are heavily influencing women to postpone some potentially life saving procedures, I am very uncomfortable with this outcome. My patients specifically come to me to take care of their needs and help them not only prevent but also catch early problems that would ultimately if undiagnosed, create misery, confusion and true risk to their life and well-being. They want to trust of my expert advice and I will only give the very best advice to them, since I feel they deserve this.

I have actually started writing this article nearly 100 different times. Each time I see an article telling the world that it is okay to live in a bubble, to not worry about real risks and problems and to accept being talked out of taking care of them selves. I have no statistics to offer to prove my point or to assure my patients that I am more correct than these major academic organizations. I am not a prestigious teaching physician. I am not the head of a well-known hospital or medical center. I am in a sense a lone practitioner who simply takes the very best care of and sincerely cares about his patients as unique, valuable and deserving individuals.

I have no great words of wisdom to offer, I simply have more than 42 years of medical practice experience on the front line working with women. The vast majority of my patients choose to prevent and not to live in fear of having life changing medical conditions such as cancer of the breast, uterus, ovaries, vulva or any other organ or bodily system take over their life.

I feel fortunate that, here on the front line, I do not see a great deal of cancer or other lethal health problems in my patients, yet cancer and other major health problems are not at all uncommon.

What I do see is that the great majority of women with breast cancer often have found it by themselves. They often did so when they detected a lump in their breast that was not previously present. How do I know this, because it is the most common way we as physicians see breast cancer’s detected. The difference between those caught early which are 100% curable and those caught late which ultimately require radical mastectomies, chemotherapy and radiation is the fact that most of the women with early tumors found their cancers either randomly or during monthly breast-self exams. The other group of early cancer patients are those who did come in for yearly breast exam and/or mammography.

I cannot imagine how any articles could say that it is better to wait,. But unfortunately they do and this not only makes me angry, but it makes me question what the underlying intent of these studies and subsequent articles are. Are they to protect women or to protect the insurance companies profits? No one can tel me that waiting until cancer is in an advanced stages saves anyone any money or in fact suffering, anxiety or pain either.

I have practiced medicine long enough to know, and as my professor of Statistics told me on my first day at UCLA School of Public Health, “Tell me what you want me to prove and I will design the study to prove exactly what you want to prove for you and anyone reading it.” While I hate to say things like this, since most medical practitioners and academic organizations are honest and really care about their patients, the truth is studies are paid for by someone and as we have just seen in our last presidential election, truth is often in the eye of the person with the dollars.

I have added an article to this month’s HolisticGynPS.Com newsletter that would at first glance appear to be out of place, a story regarding the decrease in the death rate from ovarian cancer done in England. Ovarian Cancer Deaths Fall By 20%, England.

Why should we, here in America, care about what is happening in England? The answer lies in a short statement mid-way through this article, “.. the fall in deaths could be because we are getting better at detecting and treating ovarian cancer.” The author cites improvements in scanning procedures, surgery and chemotherapy treatments. The decrease in deaths in England, is occurring because they are getting better at detecting and treating ovarian cancer, not because they are delaying detection.

The takeaway here is that in order to prevent deaths from ovarian cancer we must first detect it while it is early enough. How can ovarian cancer or breast cancer for that matter, be detected if we are telling women to stay home, stop self exams and wait longer and longer to come in to their doctor to be seen, screened and checked?

Cancer is always time sensitive! Even if it may take years for some cancers to develop, during this time the cancer will likely go unrecognized until one of two things happens, 1) the woman develops signs and symptoms which could mean that her cancer has advanced, or 2) the woman or her doctor finds it early enough to start treatment before the woman’s life and well-being are at risk.

Telling women to wait for years, to not go in for regular check ups, while an early or worse advanced cancer might be allowed to grow, can only suggest that, “the inmates are running the asylum.” To me waiting seems to be a fool’s delight, it may make some people very happy and believe that this saves lots of money, but others will not fare so well. True we might spend more money offering preventive services and we are likely to get lot’s of normal test results, to which I say, Hurray!!!, For every woman I have ever known hearing the words, “Everything is normal, you are safe” almost always rings joyful in their heart and soul.

Everyone out there can believe what they desire. Too many times this doc has heard from specialists, “Sorry! It is just too late to do her any good!” This is a message I would like to never ever have to hear again. I invite my patients to come to see me or go to another doctor every year and get checked. Don’t just go for a pap smear and mammography, do make sure to also get your blood pressure checks, look for an unexpected anemia, check for skin cancers, check for blood in your stool, get a complete yearly exam and know that you are working to prevent diabetes, heart disease and cancers. Stop listening to those who can tell you that you can wait. It would be a horrible shock to be told by specialists that you did not come in soon enough.

This might ultimately break the system, but truthfully, if you care about the system why not elect representatives who can help fix this already broken system? Let’s find people who can support and improve early detection, believe in the benefits of screening and early treatment, rather than simply leave more and more lives hanging in the wind. Health issues are always time sensitive!

midlifewalking141x170.jpgMoving 6,000 or more steps a day -- no matter how -- adds up to a healthier life for midlife women. That level of physical activity decreases the risk of diabetes and metabolic syndrome (a diabetes precursor and a risk for cardiovascular disease), showed a study published online this month in Menopause, the journal of the North American Menopause Society.

To read the full article Daily Steps Add Up for Midlife Women's Health, click here.
sick136x170.jpgWhen you wake up feeling under the weather, the last thing you’re capable of doing is thinking clearly. But if it’s a weekday, the decision you have to make—call out or head in—is as stressful and confusing as the time you had to figure out what to do with your boss’s Facebook friend request.

To read the full article 5 Times You Should Call in Sick to Work, click here.
birthcontrol155x170.jpgA dramatic new study with implications for next month’s presidential election finds that offering women free birth control can reduce unplanned pregnancies -- and send the abortion rate spiraling downward.

To read the full article Free Birth Control Cuts Abortion Rate Dramatically, Study Finds, click here.
ovariancacouple146x170.jpgDeaths from ovarian cancer among women in England have fallen by 20% over the last ten years, says a new report from the National Cancer Intelligence Network released on 20 November.

To read the full article Ovarian Cancer Deaths Fall By 20%, England, click here.
womandreaming170x156.jpgWith the book "Fifty Shades of Grey" still flying off the shelves, women are discovering the power of sexual fantasy, some for the first time.

To read the full article More Women Harness Power of Fantasy, click here.
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If your goal is to lose weight, no one will tell you to drink more soda. But Pepsi Special, a new fiber-infused soda from Pepsi-Cola, has been marketed as being able to block fat and reduce hunger. And some nutritionists are calling foul.

To read the full article Can Soda Help You Lose Weight?, click here.
itchyscalp130x170.jpgGive your dry skin the moisture it craves.

Flaky, itchy, dry skin can plague you all year, and it’s often worse in winter. But whenever it happens, you only want relief, and you want it fast.

To read the full article 6 Quick and Easy Dry Skin Relievers, click here.
feelinggoog140x170.jpgWhat words would you associate with being old? I asked a few people recently, and here are just some of the words they used: fuddy-duddy, not fresh, decrepit, sad, wrinkly, tired, stiff, brittle, unhappy, invisible, obsolete, diminished, fat, fragile, cranky, and marginalized.

To read the full story Are Your Thoughts Making You Old?, click here.
healthreforminsurance150x170.jpgPresident Obama's re-election guarantees that the health reform law will continue rolling out.

A WebMD survey after the election found that many readers want to know what impact the law will have on their health care costs.

To read the full story Will Health Reform Cost Me More?, click here.
affordablecare170x130.jpgOne Big Winner in Tuesday's Vote: Health Reform

One of the biggest winners Tuesday night was health reform. Now that President Barack Obama has won a second term and kept a Democratic majority in the Senate to back him up, Republicans have lost any chance at repealing his biggest domestic initiative.

To read the full story One Big Winner in Tuesday's Vote: Health Reform, click here.
ObamaHealthReform122x170.jpgNow that President Barack Obama has won a second term, the Affordable Care Act is back on a fast track. Some analysts argue that there could be modifications to reduce federal spending as part of a broader deficit deal; for now, this is just speculation. What is clear is that the law will have sweeping ramifications for consumers, state officials, employers and health care providers, including hospitals and doctors.

To read the full story A Consumer's Guide to Health Reform, Post-Election, click here.
testiculartrauma170x170.jpgGenital Harm More Common Than Dental Injuries, Study Shows

Think twice before making fun of your friend for going to the hospital after getting hit in the crotch with a soccer ball.  According to a study published in the Journal of Urology, these accidents are more common than you’d imagine.

To read the full story Genital Harm More Common Than Dental Injuries, Study Shows, click here.
kneepain124x170.jpgGot Knee Pain? Blame Your Cycle

Aching knees? Don’t blame the weather–check your cycle instead. The muscles in your knees work differently at different points in your menstrual cycle, according to a study presented at the Integrative Biology of Exercise Conference. This changing muscle function destabilizes your joints and can set you up for serious pain.

To read the full story Got Knee Pain? Blame Your Cycle, click here.
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When Is It Okay to Go Without a Condom?


Safe sex: Does it always mean using a condom? You should know by now that forgoing condoms during sex puts you at heightened risk of unintended pregnancy and contracting STDs.

To read the full article When Is It Okay to Go Without a Condom?, click here.
uti130x170.jpgThe Common UTI Remedy That Doesn’t Work

Dealing with a urinary tract infection? Skip the cranberry therapy. According to a review published in the Cochrane Library, drinking cranberry juice or taking cranberry supplements may do little to prevent a UTI.

To read the full article The Common UTI Remedy That Doesn’t Work, click here.
memory140x170.jpgHow To Forget Unwanted Memories

There are two ways we can forget a memory that causes unpleasant sensations, be they a humiliating gaffe at some dinner party or an extremely frightening event, say researchers from the University of Cambridge, England, in the October 17th edition of Neuron.

To read the full story How To Forget Unwanted Memories, click here.
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Free Birth Control Cuts Abortion Rate Dramatically


A dramatic new study with implications for next month’s presidential election finds that offering women free birth control can reduce unplanned pregnancies -- and send the abortion rate spiraling downward.

To read the full story Free Birth Control Cuts Abortion Rate Dramatically, Study Finds, click here.
greens170x105.jpgIn this article WebMd presents a slideshow to offer readers 13 ways to add greens tot heir diet. We all know that greens are high density nutrient laden foods. They can help us increase vitamins, minerals and fiber in simple fun to eat dishes.

To read the full story 13 Easy Ways to Eat More Greens, click here.
MediterraneanDietPyramid-170x170.jpgModerately obese people who ate the Mediterranean diet lost more weight than groups of people who followed either a low-fat or a low-carbohydrate diet, researchers reported.

To read the full story Mediterranean Dieters Kept Weight Off for Six Years, click here.
Probiotics105x170.jpgA fascinating, if disconcerting, fact: More than 100 trillion so-called good bacteria thrive in or on the human body. A sizable chunk of them maintain residence in the human digestive tract. Probiotics, live microorganisms that benefit their human host, are among these beneficial bacteria.

To read the full story Probiotics: a Gut-check on Bacterial Health, click here.
burnout120x170.jpgJust into October and it officially feels like fall. Those free feelings of endless summer days and warm weather are completely gone. We've gone back to work, the kids have started school and everyone is wondering how to bring back those feelings of stress-free happiness and avoid burnout in the office and at home.

To read the full story 5 Steps to Avoid Burnout, click here.
moneydownthedrain-170x170.jpgIf Mitt Romney gets elected as president and keeps his promise to repeal the 2010 health reform law, more than 72 million Americans will be lacking health insurance by 2030 and health care costs will rise, a report from the Commonwealth Fund projects.

To read the full story Romney Health Plan Would Cost Us, Group Says, click here.
antibiotics170x150.jpgYour family doctor knows best, right? Not always. Many physicians routinely prescribe antibiotics for a common ailment that cannot effectively be wiped out with drugs.

To read the full article ALERT: Antibiotics Won’t Fix This Common Condition, click here.

meditationrelievingpain135x170.jpgIf you’ve been around meditation  for a while you know that it’s helpful with a lot of things. Emotional challenges, physical problems, and spiritual maladies are just some of the things that meditation can help provide both relief and insight into. The bigger question for most, however, is how does this alternative healing practice do it?

To read the full article Why Meditation May Be Effective In Relieving Pain, click here.

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Whether you are avoiding gluten to manage celiac disease or gluten intolerance, you may find your first attempt (or first 20 attempts) at gluten free baking to be a challenge. Not only does gluten free baking often require unusual ingredients, it’s also much more complicated than baking with gluten-containing grains (wheat, rye, & barley).

To read the full article Baking Without Gluten, click here.
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A gene that seems to make females happy, but not males, has been identified by researchers at the University of South Florida, Columbia University, and the New York State Psychiatry Institute.

To read the full article Gene That Makes Women Happy Identified, click here.
overactivebladder107x170.jpgSleep apnea in women has been linked to overactive bladder syndrome in a new study. The research, presented Monday (Sept. 3, 2012) at the European Respiratory Society's Annual Congress in Vienna, has provided new evidence suggesting a connection between the two conditions.

To read the full article Overactive Bladder Linked to Sleep Apnea in Women, click here.

For more indormation regarding overactive bladder and how it might affect you, checkl out htis a slide show,  Overactive Bladder Syndrome, click here .

thinkthin170x144.jpgAre you convinced that your normal-weight frame is…well, fat? By thinking so, you could be packing on the pounds.

New research published in the Journal of Obesity found that normal weight women who perceive themselves as fat are more likely to become fat. In the 10-year study of 1,196 normal-weight teenagers, nearly 6 in 10 women who perceived themselves as fat became overweight (measured by body mass index) within the decade, while only 3 in 10 of those with an accurate body image became overweight.

To read the full article Think Yourself Thin, click here.
muffins140x170.jpgTo snack or not to snack? That depends on the snack. Done the right way (calorie-controlled, nutrient-rich), snacking can keep cravings in check and up the nutritional quality of your diet. But all too often some of the most common snacks—even the ones that seem healthy—are filled with salt, sugar, excess calories, and even harmful chemicals

To read the full article The Worst Snacks For Your Body, click here.
er130x170.jpgHow Paul Ryan’s Plan Could Change Medicaid, Medicare and Everyone’s Access to 24/7 Care

The proposed changes to Medicaid and Medicare by Congressman, and Republican Vice Presidential candidate, Paul Ryan will undoubtedly change the landscape of 24/7 emergency care. U.S. emergency rooms, with 123.8 million visits per year, are a staple in many communities, especially inner city and rural areas.

To read the full article How Paul Ryan’s Plan Could Change Medicaid, Medicare and Everyone’s Access to 24/7 Care, click here.
bloodsugar130x170.jpgYou may be at risk for shrinkage in areas of your brain that have been linked to dementia even if your blood sugar is just on the high end of the normal range.

To read the full article Even High Normal Blood Sugar Levels May Induce Brain Shrinkage, click here.

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Email Stress Test: Experiment Unplugs Workers for 5 Days. Slave to your email? Wonder what would happen if you had to do without it? UC Irvine informatics professor Gloria Mark was curious — so she recently led a study that separated 13 people from their email for five days and recorded what happened when they unplugged.

To read the full article Email Stress Test: Experiment Unplugs Workers for 5 Days, click here.

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The notion that Ancel Keys was wrong -- profoundly wrong -- when he was among the first to advocate forcefully for low-fat eating to prevent heart disease is evolving into New Age gospel.

To read the full article Living (and Dying) on a Diet of Unintended Consequences, click here.

incontinence170x170.jpgFor Young Women, Incontinence Can Happen Regardless of Pregnancy

Urinary incontinence may be just as common in younger women who have never been pregnant as it is in women who have had children, according to a new Australian study.

To read the full article For Young Women, Incontinence Can Happen Regardless of Pregnancy, click here.
fiber130x170.jpgThe Best Kind of Fiber for Weight Loss

Chowing down on fiber-enriched foods such as yogurt, soy milk, and breakfast bars might seem like an easy way to hit your nutritional goals, but it may not help you lose weight.

To read the full article The Best Kind of Fiber for Weight Loss, click here.
period-pennies170x150.jpgBleeding Money: Could PMS Leave You Penniless?

Do you blame your reoccurring shopping sprees on your weakness for shoes? Well, according to a recent study in the Journal of Consumer Psychology, your penchant for pumps may have more to do with biology than psychology.

To read the full article Bleeding Money: Could PMS Leave You Penniless?, click here.
papsmear150x170.jpgOb-Gyns Recommend Annual Well-Woman Visit
But other medical experts question value of yearly pelvic examinations

Women should have a well-woman appointment with their doctor every year, typically including pelvic and breast exams as well as any recommended screening, according to a group of U.S. Ob-Gyns.

To read the full article Ob-Gyns Recommend Annual Well-woman Visit, click here.
happypiggy170x170.jpgThe Secret to Happiness (Hint: It’s Not Money)

Science has found the key to happiness—and it’s not a big, fat paycheck. Instead, making a good, respectable name for yourself leads to the most satisfaction, according to a new study in Psychological Science.

To read the full article The Secret to Happiness (Hint: It’s Not Money), click here.
marriedcouple170x170.jpg6 Scientific Tips for a Successful Marriage

How to find wedded bliss: While scientists have yet to concoct a love potion, their research is providing some helpful tips for a successful marriage.

To read the full article 6 Scientific Tips for a Successful Marriage, click here.
blood test130x170.jpgScreenings controversial but may prevent 17,000 advanced cases each year

Screening for prostate cancer using the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test is controversial, but stopping this screening could result in many more cases of advanced disease, a new study suggests.

Researchers analyzed information from the time before and after PSA testing became widespread, and found that screening using the PSA test prevents an estimated 17,000 cases of advanced prostate cancer in the United States each year.

To read the full article New Study Fuels Debate on Prostate Cancer Tests, click here.
propecia105x170.jpgDrugs such as  finasteride (Propecia) and dutasteride (Avodart) may produce significant side effects in some people, including loss of libido, erectile dysfunction (ED), ejaculatory dysfunction and potential depression, according to a recent study.

To read the full article Drugs for Hair Loss and Enlarged Prostate May Cause Loss of Libido, Ed in Men, click here.
tstosterone150x170.jpgDiabetes and low testosterone go hand-in-hand: One in three diabetic men have low testosterone. But one potential cause of diabetes is low testosterone. So which came first, testosterone deficiency or diabetes?

To read the full article Does Low Testosterone = Diabetes?, click here
lies165x170.jpgA Notre Dame researcher is hoping this tongue-in-cheek advice will someday take hold, based on results of a "science of honesty" study she completed that showed tangible mental and physical health benefits among those who significantly reduced their everyday lies.

To read the full article For Good Health, Be Sure to Eat Fruits and Vegetables, Exercise Regularly and Lie as Seldom as Possible, click here.
Womanfuneral130x170.jpgA new study of mitochondrial DNA in fruit flies offers a number of clues that might explain why females tend to outlive males across much of the animal kingdom, including humans.

To read the full article Genetic Clue Discovered For Why
CFLBulbs150x170.jpgCFL Bulbs may be dangerous to you and to your skin. This Health Day video suggests that you consider UV leaks as a risk and use CFL bulbs with care.

To read the full article Light Bulb Warning, click here.
deitmenopause124x170.jpgMenopausal women who lose weight eating a low-fat diet rich in fruits and vegetables could reduce or eliminate their hot flashes and night sweats, a large new study suggests.

One reason the researchers looked at weight loss as a way of dealing with menopausal symptoms was because of long-standing research linking hormone-replacement therapy to heart disease and breast cancer.

To read the full article Diet, Weight Loss Ease Menopause Symptoms: Study, click here.
artichoke124x170.jpgStuck in a food rut? If you're looking to liven up your diet to satisfy both your taste buds and nutritional needs, you don't want to miss this list of healthy-but-often-overlooked foods.

To read the full article Healthy Foods That Aren't On Your Plate -- But Should Be, click here.
doctor170x170.jpgDoctors may be more willing to use hormone replacement therapy (HRT), or recommend it to their wives, than to prescribe it to their patients, a study of German gynecologists suggests.

Nearly all were willing to recommend HRT for hot flashes, a typical menopause problem, whether to a partner or a patient. But with other potential uses, there was some disconnect.

To read the full article Doctors Use Hormones More Often than Prescribe Them, click here.
Stress120x170.jpgStress at work may have an adverse effect on your heart health if you're a woman.

A new study shows that women who have high-stress jobs are 67 percent more likely to have a heart attack and 38 percent more likely to have any kind of cardiovascular event than women who have more low-stress jobs.

To read the full article Women with High-Stress Jobs May Be More Likely to Have a Heart Attack, click here.
bugsting170x150.jpgThe Best Ways to Soothe Summer Bug Bites

Flirty dresses, fruity drinks…what’s not to love about summer? How about itchy, painful insect stings? New Orleans–based dermatologist Larry Millikan, M.D., explains how to identify and deal with bug bites so you can get back to the beach.

To read the full article The Best Ways to Soothe Summer Bug Bites, click here.
dressing170x150.jpg

 

Salad is right up there with diamonds on a girl’s list of BFFs. But drizzling it with fat-free dressing could be drowning out your good intentions.

To read the full article The Dressing That Makes Your Salad Healthier, click here.

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Research shows that one in six cell phones are contaminated with fecal matter that could contain E. coli. Not only can germs from your phone make you sick, they can also cause annoyances like pimples and irritation on your cheeks and jawline.

To read the full article The Dirtiest Thing In Your Purse, click here.
Health Tip: Flavor Food Without the Fat
Use high heat for more intense tastes

You don't need to add fat to get plenty of flavor from your favorite dishes.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics offers these suggestions to spice up your food without piling on the calories:

To read the full story Health Tip: Flavor Food Without the Fat, click here.
tomaino130X170.jpgManage Your Brain -- It's Your Most Important Asset

What does it mean to manage your own brain?

The field of neuropsychology -- the applied form of neuroscience -- is now offering an emerging consciousness about the brain's inner workings. As with everything, it is when we know how the brain works that we can have something to say about how to work it.

To read the full story Manage Your Brain -- It's Your Most Important Asset, click here.
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Before you soak up the sun this weekend, finish your coffee. The strong stuff can reduce your risk of developing the most common type of skin cancer, according to a new study published in the journal Cancer Research.

To read the full story The Drink that Fights Cancer, click here.
worry140x170.jpgAnxiety Cranks up Activity in Women's Brains, Study Suggests

Women who worry a lot have brains that work overtime even during easy tasks, new research suggests. The findings could help in the identification and treatment of anxiety disorders, according to the Michigan State University scientists who conducted the study.

To read the full article Anxiety Cranks up Activity in Women's Brains, Study Suggests, click here.
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Obese Adults Should Get Counseling, Federal Task Force Says


Under the healthcare law, insurance companies would be required to cover the panel's recommended weight-loss treatments. The Supreme Court is expected to rule on the law this week.

To read the full article Obese Adults Should Get Counseling, Federal Task Force Says, click here.

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Many of us don't need to be told we're more stressed than ever, but now, scientists have the data to prove it.

If the 80's seemed like a simpler time, you're right. Life's more connected and convenient now, but a 30 year study proves we're wired, tired, and maxed out.

To read the full article Who's Stressed Out?, click here.

calciumvitamin140x170.jpgOlder adults who take vitamin D and calcium supplements c than their peers, a new research review suggests.

To read the full article Vitamin D Plus Calcium Tied to Longer Life , click here.
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Video: Phone Therapy May Aid Depression Patients

Phone therapy for depression may work better than face-to-face therapy.

To read the full article Video: Phone Therapy May Aid Depression Patients, click here.

womencheating120x170.gifThese days it’s easy to be unfaithful–just ask the 3.3 million members of AshleyMadison.com, a discreet online dating site for married parties. It’s no wonder that loyalty (to your spouse or your hair stylist) can be hard to come by.

To read the full article The Average Woman and Cheating, click here.
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Memorial day is the unofficial start of summer and avoiding a few nasty surprises can help you breathe easily during the next few months. The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology is calling attention to five asthma and allergy triggers that can derail your fun this summer.

To read the full article 5 Surprising Summer Allergies, click here.
stopsmoking120x170.jpgMove over patches and gums - fruits and vegetables may help smokers quit the habit. For the study, published in the June 5 issue of Nicotine and Tobacco Research, researchers looked at 1,000 adult smokers aged 25 and older and surveyed them on their smoking and eating habits. Then the smokers were called 14 months later to find out how much they had smoked in the past month.

To read the full story Eating Fruits and Vegetables Might Help Smokers Quit, click here.
fructose120x170.jpgRats fed fructose-laced drinking water for six weeks performed more slowly in a maze-navigating task, UCLA researchers have found. They think the effect is due to changes in the way the brain responds to insulin  as a result of exposure to fructose.

To read the full article Fructose Makes Rats Dumber. What Sugars Should We Avoid?, click here.
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Results of a 14-year study conclude that coffee-drinkers live longer than people who don't partake. Jeff Glor and Rebecca Jarvis spoke with author Robert Davis, Ph.D. for more.

To read the full article Coffee Drinkers Live Longer: Study, click here.
apnea150x170.jpgSleep apnea may prove to be a treatable cause of high blood pressure, according to research released today that suggests wearing a special breathing mask at night may protect apnea patients from the hypertension.

To read the full article Sleep Apnea Treatment May Prevent Hypertension, click here.
sleepapnea156x170.jpgTwo new studies have found that people with sleep apnea, a common disorder that causes snoring, fatigue and dangerous pauses in breathing at night, have a higher risk of cancer.

To read the full article Sleep Apnea Tied to Increased Cancer Risk, click here.
imagewoman120x170.jpgWomen Seen As Objects, Not People In Sexualized Images

Perfume ads, beer billboards, movie posters: everywhere you look, women's sexualized bodies are on display. A new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, finds that both men and women see images of sexy women's bodies as objects, while they see sexy-looking men as people.

To read the full article Women Seen As Objects, Not People In Sexualized Images, click here.
Busywomansitting-170x170.jpgProlonged periods of sitting may increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes in women. In the study, a woman's likelihood of having risk factors for diabetes, such as insulin resistance and chronic inflammation, increased with the more time she spent sitting. No such link was found in men.

To read the full article Prolonged Sitting May Increase Women's Diabetes Risk
healthyv150x170.jpgThe community of bacteria in the vagina that is considered "healthy" for a woman can vary a lot between individuals, a new study suggests. The finding is contrary to the prevailing idea that some vaginal microbes are nearly universally good for a woman's health while others are bad.

To read the full story What Constitutes a 'Healthy' Vagina?
healthyheart140x170.jpgResisting a Rest? Revival Tips for Women on the Go-Go-Go

It's 6 a.m., and Alena Burley's alarm clock is screaming. By 7:30, the 23-year-old from Tallahassee, Florida, has walked her dog, eaten an egg-white omelet, showered, dressed, and driven 30 minutes to her third-grade teaching job.

To read the full story Resisting a Rest? Revival Tips for Women on the Go-Go-Go
coffee170x170.jpgResearchers tracking health and coffee consumption found that coffee drinkers had a lower risk of death during the course of the study. Subjects who averaged four or five cups per day fared best, though it's not clear why.

To read the full story Coffee Linked to Lower Risk of Death
raspberryketone134x170.jpgDr. Oz Weighs In. Until recently, very few people had ever heard of raspberry ketones, the aromatic compounds that give the berries their distinctive smell. Today, health food stores have trouble keeping the capsules or drops of the stuff on their shelves.

To read the full story Are Raspberry Ketones a 'Miracle' Fat Burner?
salmonfarm170x130.jpg7 Foods You Should Never Eat

Food scientists are shedding light on items loaded with toxins and chemicals--and simple swaps for a cleaner diet and supersized health. This means choosing fruits, vegetables, and meats that are raised, grown, and sold with minimal processing. Often they're organic, and rarely (if ever) should they contain additives.

To read the full article  7 Foods You Should Never Eat, click here.
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Six "Grow Younger" Nutrients I Take Every Day


Nutritionists have long been interested in the dynamics of telomere length in the body, and how telomeres figure in to human health and life expectancy. Telomeres  were first discovered in 1973 by Alexey Olovnikov.

To read the full article Six "Grow Younger" Nutrients I Take Every Day, click here.
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Understanding The Real Causes of Ageing


First and most important is the brainwashing people have from society and the media around the ageing process. As soon as we are born, we soon learn about the negative things we can expect from being older, because of society's fear around ageing.

To read the full article Understanding The Real Causes of Ageing, click here.
exercisewater130x170.jpgBeing Physically Active Might Lengthen the Lives of People with Breast and Colon Cancer, a New Study Suggests.

Exercise may also benefit patients with other cancers, but there is no substantial evidence to make that claim, the researchers added.

To read the full article Being Physically Active Might Lengthen the Lives of People with Breast and Colon Cancer, a New Study Suggests, click here.
drving-140x170.jpgLong Commute to Work May Also Drive You to Poor Health!

According to the US Census Bureau, American workers now spend about 25 minutes getting to work, on average. Only about 3 1/2 percent walk or ride their bike. That means a lot of extra time sitting down most days of the week.

To view Long Commute to Work May Also Drive You to Poor Health!, click here.
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Depression Later in Life May Mean Higher Dementia Risk


A new study shows that middle-aged and elderly men and women who suffer from depression may be at a higher risk of developing dementia.

To read the full article Depression Later in Life May Mean Higher Dementia Risk, click here.

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Attitude may play an important role in how exercise affects menopausal women, according to Penn State researchers, who identified two types of women - one experiences more hot flashes after physical activity, while the other experiences fewer.

To read the full article  Menopause, Hot Flashes, Exercise And Attitude, click here.

HealingWoman-170x170.jpgA national study shows that women are less likely than men to get at least 30 minutes of exercise per day, resulting in greater odds of developing metabolic syndrome - a risky and increasingly prevalent condition related to obesity.

To read the full article Women Who Lack Exercise At Greater Risk Of Developing Metabolic Syndrome, click here.
stressincontinence170x140.jpgA type of exercise called pelvic floor muscle training is effective for treating adult women with urinary incontinence (the involuntary loss of urine) without risk of side effects, according to a new report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

To read the full article Pelvic Muscle Training Effective in Treating Urinary Incontinence for Women, click here.

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Fact or Fiction? Common Exercise Myths BUSTED

New client consultations always remind me of the common misconceptions about exercise that continue to be perpetuated.

To read the full article Fact or Fiction? Common Exercise Myths BUSTED, click here.

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Would you like to have some simple, easy-to-learn (and free!) techniques at your fingertips to relieve stress?

To read the full article Is Stress a Choice?, click here.

MetabolicSyndromeMan52x170.jpg"Guy walks into a doctor's office . . . " That's not the start of a joke—that is the joke. Men don't go to doctors unless they're in serious pain or really spooked about something.

To read the full article 7 Instant Health Checks to Save Your Life, click here.
metformin120x170.jpgDiabetes drug metformin may double as cancer-fighting medicine. Metformin  is a workhorse drug for people with diabetes. It helps patients control their blood sugar and makes them more sensitive to insulin. But soon, metformin  may take on a new role fighting cancer.

To read the full Article Diabetes Drug Metformin May Double as Cancer-fighting Medicine, click here.
foot130x170.jpgYour feet can carry you far, approximately 5,117 steps each day, as one study shows. Kickstarting a life of better health doesn't require you to be a marathon runner, according to Dr. Weil.

To read the full article 5 Steps For Better Foot Health, click here.
60minutessugar170x100.jpgIf you are what you eat, then what does it mean that the average American consumes 130 pounds of sugar a year? Sanjay Gupta reports on new research showing that beyond weight gain, sugar can take a serious toll on your health, worsening conditions ranging from heart disease to cancer. Some physicians go so far as to call sugar a toxin.

To read the full article Is Sugar Toxic?, click here.
60minutessugar170x100.jpgNew studies are supporting claims that sugar is poisoning us Sanjay Gupta reports on "60 Minutes." Also, nutritionist and registered dietician Cynthia Sass speaks to the "CBS This Morning" co-hosts about the war on sugar.

To read the full article War on Sugar: Is it Toxic?, click here.
60minutessugar170x100.jpgAmericans' Consumption of Sugar "Unprecedented"

(CBS News) The amount of sugar consumed by Americans today is unprecedented, and is contributing to heart disease and high blood pressure, a dietitian said on "CBS This Morning."

To read the full article Americans' Consumption of Sugar "Unprecedented", click here.
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Could Your Hectic Life Be Killing You?


Many women deal with stress on a daily basis, and new research indicates it could be killing them. Nearly 50 percent of American women say they don’t have enough free time, according to a study by the Families and Work Institute, an alarming figure given the effects that stress can have on the human body.

To read the full article Women and Stress: Could Your Hectic Life Be Killing You?, click here.
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New Mammogram Benefits for Women in Their 40s

Breast Cancers Found by Mammograms More Easily Treated. When women in their 40s get breast cancer, their tumors need less intense treatment and recur less often if they were first detected during routine mammogram screening.

To read the full article New Mammogram Benefits for Women in Their 40s, click here.

angina-attack.jpgStudy: Heart Attacks Harder to Detect in Women

Heart attacks are the number-one killer of women, but CBS medical correspondent Dr. Jonathan LaPook reports they may be missing the warning signs.

Three years ago, when Wendy Kennedy noticed tingling and pain in her left arm, the last thing she thought of was a heart attack.

To read the full Study: Heart Attacks Harder to Detect in Women, click here.
womanheartexam-1.jpgHeart Attacks in Young Women Can Be Harder to Detect, Deadlier

Tami Kimet thought she was coming down with the flu, but the 35-year-old mother of two was actually having a massive heart attack.

To read the full article Heart Attacks in Young Women Can Be Harder to Detect, Deadlier, click here.
ovarianpain150x170.jpgEndometriosis Increases Risk of Certain Ovarian Cancers

Women with a history of endometriosis are at a significantly increased risk of developing several types of ovarian cancers, according to a new study published in the Lancet Oncology.

To read the full article Endometriosis Increases Risk of Certain Ovarian Cancers, click here.

HealingWoman-1A170x170.jpgThis month we would like to introduce two new web sites 1) www.iHealedMyself.com and www.LifeDynamicTherapy.com

These two sites are not just products of my fertile mind they are for you to support you in healing existing illness and preventing future illnesses. Our goal for presenting these materials is to provide information, support and encouragement for healing what ails you.

To check out www.iHealedMyself.com, click here.

To check out www.LifeDynamicTherapy.com, click here.

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The Best Mattress for a Better Night’s Sleep

Buying a new mattress? Here are tips for finding the right mattress for you.

You spend about a third of every day in bed. Whether that time is spent blissfully slumbering--or tossing and turning--depends a lot on your mattress.

To read the full article The Best Mattress for a Better Night’s Sleep, click here.
Colonoscopy170x170.jpgColonoscopy Life-Saving Screening

A health screening test that takes just a few minutes may add years to your life. Many studies have supported the benefit of colonoscopies.

To read the full article Life-Saving Screening, click here.
WomenHeart130x170.jpgStudy: Heart Attacks Harder to Detect in Women

A new study out today from The Journal of the American Medical Association reveals a dangerous difference in the symptoms men and women experience during a heart attack.

To read the full article Study: Heart Attacks Harder to Detect in Women, click here.
clothes170x130.jpgWardrobe Woes: Hidden Health Hazards of Clothing

Men and women who shoehorn themselves into skin-tight jeans, battle to button their trousers or knot their neckties too tightly might unknowingly suffer nerve damage, digestive disturbances and even potentially deadly blood clots.

To read the full article Wardrobe Woes: Hidden Health Hazards of Clothing, click here.
cholesterol150x170.jpgThis is an interesting video that walks you through what cholesterol is, how it affects you and what you can do about it.

To read the full article  What is High Cholesterol? A Video , click here.
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Could your Valentine's kiss give you lead poisoning? Study by FDA finds most lipsticks contain lead, so you might want to make that smooch bare-lipped. If you're going to be on either end of a kiss this Valentine's Day, you might want to consider smooching bare-lipped. Most lipstick contains lead.

To read the full article Could your Valentine's Kiss Give You Lead Poisoning?, click here.
Walking-Meditation-170x113.jpgSome might scoff at the idea of a walking meditation. For most, the practice involves grabbing a cushion, plopping oneself down with eyes closed, and turning one’s focus within.

To read the full article The Advantages Of A Walking Meditation, click here.
pad170x124.jpgWomen with peripheral artery disease, or PAD, are two to three times more likely to have a stroke or heart attack than those without it - yet it's often unrecognized and untreated, especially in women, according to a new American Heart Association scientific statement.

To read the full article Need For Further Study Of Peripheral Artery Disease In Women, click here.
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There's no link between menopause and increased risk of death from heart disease, says a study that challenges a long-held medical belief that the rate of cardiovascular death in women spikes after menopause.

To read the full article Aging, Not Menopause, Raises Women's Heart Risks, Study Finds, click here.
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New research presented at the 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) found that 77 percent of trauma patients had deficient or insufficient levels of vitamin D.

To read the full article Vitamin D Deficiency High Among Trauma Patients, click here.
OlderWomenBreastCa130x170.jpgOlder women with breast cancer may be at greater risk than younger women of dying from the disease, regardless of the type of tumor they have or treatment they undergo, according to a study released Tuesday.

To read the full article Older Women at Highest Risk for Breast Cancer Death, click here.
lonelywoman170x114.jpgNewly divorced middle aged women are more vulnerable to contract HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. this occurs because they tend to let their guard down with new sexual partners and avoid using protection since they are unafraid of getting pregnant.

To read the full article A Lonely Heart Can Make You Sick: Middle Aged Divorced Women Vulnerable to Contracting HIV, click here.

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A new study of a promising Alzheimer's treatment has doctors buzzing that the drug may reverse the deadly neurodegenerative disease.

To read the full article Cancer Drug Reverses Alzheimer's Disease in Mice: Hope for Humans?, click here.

Alzheimers-140x170.jpgAlzheimer's research in U.S. gets extra $50 million in funding

Alzheimer's disease research is set to get a big cash influx from U.S. government. The National Institutes of Health announced Tuesday it would immediately devote an extra $50 million to dementia research, as part of the Obama administration's plan to develop an effective treatment for the disease by 2025.

To read the full article Alzheimer's Research in U.S. Gets Extra $50 Million in Funding, click here.
BackPinWeight130x170.jpgObesity may be a major cause of back pain and even worse problems.

If you look at your back in a mirror, you can see your vertebrae, which are the bones in your spine. What you can't see are your discs, which are soft cushions between these bones. Discs that break down can lead to pain and disability.

To read the full article Obesity May Be a Major Cause of Back Pain and Even Worse Problems, click here.

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A Guide to Decoding Ingredients on Grain Products

Claims on the front of packages such as “whole grain,” “multigrain” and “12-grain” have been given no legal definition given by the Food and Drug Administration.

To read the full article A Guide to Decoding Ingredients on Grain Products, click here.

marijuana170x140.jpgMarijuana Lung Findings Unlikely to Change Minds

Marijuana smoke does not damage lungs in the same manner as tobacco smoke, according to a study released Tuesday.

To read the full article Marijuana Lung Findings Unlikely to Change Minds, click here.
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Are You at High Risk for Serious Illness from Flu?


If you are at high risk, flu vaccination is especially important to decrease your risk of severe flu illness. Get your flu vaccine today.

To read the full article Are You at High Risk for Serious Illness from Flu?, click here.
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Why People Who Pray Are Healthier Than Those Who Don't


If you want to achieve maximum health, here are a few things that you should do: exercise regularly, eat nutritious and minimally processed foods, drop those extra pounds -- and pray.

To read the full article Why People Who Pray Are Healthier Than Those Who Don't , click here.
petloss120x170.jpgSupport group helps those mourning loss of four-legged family members

Last year was a tough one for Janine Kressler. Within six months, the Phillipsburg  resident lost three beloved pets — Lily, Toby and Rosie — all to cancer.

To read the full article Coping with Pet Loss, click here.
PainandMeditation170-170.jpgWhy Meditation May Be Effective In Relieving Pain

If you’ve been around meditation for a while you know that it’s helpful with a lot of things. Emotional challenges, physical problems, and spiritual maladies are just some of the things that meditation can help provide both relief and insight into.

To read the full article Why Meditation May Be Effective In Relieving Pain, click here.
ColonBreastCaPrevention130x170.jpgColon and Breast Cancer Prevention Through Lifestyle Changes

While some causes of breast and colon cancer are unpreventable (like age, family history, and inherited risk), others are completely within your control. Help prevent the formation of these dangerous diseases with some important lifestyle changes.

To read the full article Colon and Breast Cancer Prevention Through Lifestyle Changes, click here.
gossipingwomen170x110.jpgGossip Might Be Good for You

Despite its bad rap, gossip might be a good thing. Spreading the word about untrustworthy people or unfair situations helps temper frustration, a new study found.

To read the full article Gossip Might Be Good for You, click here.
healthywoman120x170.jpgWhy Women Report Being in Worse Health than Men

When asked to rate their own health, women, on average, consistently report being in worse health than men do, and a new study from researchers in Spain says this is because women have a higher rate of chronic diseases — contradicting a previous theory that women's lower self-rated health is simply a reporting bias.

To read the full article Why Women Report Being in Worse Health than Men, click here.
Stroke142x170.jpgAnti-Stroke Diet

A way to protect yourself from strokes is a method that Goldilocks might support: Don't eat too many calories or too few calories, but just the right amount.

To read the full article Anti-Stroke Diet, click here.
familydinner170x120.jpgHealth Tip: Make Eating a Family Affair

Suggestions for healthy group meals. It's easier to eat healthy when everybody in the family is practicing the same nutritional habits.

The American Academy of Family Physicians offers these suggestions to help the whole family eat healthy:

To read the full article Health Tip: Make Eating a Family Affair, click here.
licoriceroot160x170.jpgLicorice Root May Cut Cavities, Gum Disease

Chinese Licorice Root May Help Prevent, Treat Tooth Decay and Gum Disease

A substance known as the main ingredient of a classic candy may actually be good for your teeth: licorice. According to a new study in the Journal of Natural Products, licorice root may help keep teeth healthy.

To read the full article Licorice Root May Cut Cavities, Gum Disease, click here.
mentaldecline140x170.jpgMental Decline Can Start at 45, Study Finds

Early lapses in memory, reasoning may signal dementia later in life, researchers say, Sorry, Boomers, but a new study suggests that memory, reasoning and comprehension can start to slip as early as age 45.

This finding runs counter to conventional wisdom that mental decline doesn't begin before 60, the researchers added.

To read the full article Mental Decline Can Start at 45, Study Finds, click here.
ProstateScreening170x120.jpgRoutine Prostate Cancer Screening Doesn't Reduce Risk of Death

Routine screening for prostate cancer does not lower the risk of dying from the disease, according to new study results, reigniting the controversy over the benefits of annual testing.

To read the full article Routine Prostate Cancer Screening Doesn't Reduce Risk of Death, click here.
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A Woman's Heart Attack Risk May Begin Before She's Born


A woman's risk of having a heart attack may begin to rise even before she is born, a new study suggests, and the findings may help researchers better understand the nature of heart disease  in women.

To read the full article A Woman's Heart Attack Risk May Begin Before She's Born, click here.
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The Advantages Of A Walking Meditation


Some might scoff at the idea of a walking meditation. For most, the practice involves grabbing a cushion, plopping oneself down with eyes closed, and turning one’s focus within.

To read the full article The Advantages Of A Walking Meditation, click here.
hipfracture120x170.jpgHealth Tip: At Risk for Hip Fracture?

Hip fractures are common among seniors, and their risk increases with age.

The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons says risk factors for hip fractures include:

To read the full article Health Tip: At Risk for Hip Fracture?, click here.
smoking170x130.jpgQuality of Life May Improve for Smokers Who Quit

Buck up, all you smokers who are trying to quit or thinking about quitting: a study finds your quality of life might improve once you stop smoking.

To read the full article Quality of Life May Improve for Smokers Who Quit, click here.
14recipehealth170x112.jpgThis simple, fragrant soup is delicious as thick vegetable soup, not puréed. It becomes a different soup altogether when you purée it, and I like both versions equally.

To read the full article Leek, Turnip and Rice Soup, click here.
docexamwoman150x170.jpg8 Ways to Help Your Doctor Make the Right Diagnosis

Your feeling sick, maybe you are aching all over, tired or even exhausted, coughing, have a fever, some part of your body is not working correctly, what do you do?

To read the full article 8 Ways to Help Your Doctor Make the Right Diagnosis, click here.

DDaltmed88x170.jpgDepartment of Defense Embracing Alternative Medicine

Once labeled quackery these methods show promise for Veterans

Would you be surprised to know that the Department of Defense has designated several billion dollars for research into these healing techniques.

To read the full article Department of Defense Embracing Alternative Medicine, click here.
ABOtype130x170.jpgBlood Type May Affect Stroke Risk, Study Finds

Your blood type might affect your risk for stroke. People with AB and women with B were a little more likely to suffer one than people with O blood — the most common type, a study found.

To read the full article Blood Type May Affect Stroke Risk, Study Finds, click here.
spndtime170x150.jpgDads Are Doing More, but Moms Are More Stressed, Study Finds

With growing evidence that the American dad has stepped up his game when it comes to housework and child care, U.S. households would seem to have been swept clean of gender inequity.

To read the full article Dads Are Doing More, but Moms Are More Stressed, study finds, click here.
multitaskmon150x170.jpgWomen Are More Masterful at Multitasking Than Men

Women remain more adept at multitasking than their male counterparts. From managing a range of household chores while helping their children with homework, to performing computer work while handling a phone call, women pump up the volume of productivity to keep up in their busy lives.

To read the full article Women Are More Masterful at Multitasking Than Men, click here.
califestyle170x170.jpgOver 40% of Cancers Due to Lifestyle, Says Review

Nearly half of cancers diagnosed in the UK each year - over 130,000 in total - are caused by avoidable life choices including smoking, drinking and eating the wrong things, a review reveals.

To read the full article Over 40% of Cancers Due to Lifestyle, Says Review , click here.

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High Fruit And Veggie Diet In Females Reduces Stroke Risk


Females who consume lots of fruit, vegetables and grains have a lower risk of stroke, even if they have a history of cardiovascular disease.

To read the full article High Fruit And Vegg

thanksgiving170x150.jpgThanksgiving, GratitudeSaid to Boost Emotional Outlook

Giving thanks on Thanksgiving sounds like a cliche. But evidence is mounting that counting your blessings can make you happier. Think of it as an emotional reset button, psychologists say - especially in tough times like these.

To read the full article Thanksgiving, gratitude said to boost emotional outlook, click here.
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Coffee May Protect Against Endometrial Cancer

Ladies, here's another reason to defend that coffee habit you just can't kick. A new study found that java may protect against endometrial cancer, which begins in the lining of the uterus. It is the most common type of uterine cancer.

To read the full article Coffee May Protect Against Endometrial Cancer, click here.
thanfulwoman170x128.jpgThankfulness Linked to Positive Changes in Brain and Body

Grateful? Write it down. Think about it. Talk about it. 'Tis the season of thanking, and not only will you spread those positive vibrations to those around you, your health will benefit, too.

To read the full article Thankfulness Linked to Positive Changes in Brain and Body, click here.
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  Sugary Drinks: A Health Risk for Women

Drinking two or more sugar-sweetened beverages a day may expand a woman’s waistline and increase her risk of heart disease and diabetes, according to this study.

To read the full article Sugary Drinks: A Health Risk for Women, click here.

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Foods That Make You Glow from Head to Toe


While we want to look good at the beach, it's important to feel good too. Here, experts tell us the best foods to make us glow from head to toe (hint: they'll also help you shed a pound or two!) to make putting on a bathing suit a fun experience.

To read the full article Foods That Make You Glow from Head to Toe, click here.
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  Women More Likely to Have 'Broken Heart Syndrome'

Females are seven to nine times more likely to suffer "broken heart syndrome," when sudden or prolonged stress like an emotional breakup or death causes overwhelming heart failure or heart attack..

To read the full article Women More Likely to Have 'Broken Heart Syndrome', click here.

womanwalking130x170.jpgHere are 4 Secrets To Never Getting Sick

Ever wonder why you always seem to come down with a life-interrupting virus this time of year, while other women you know sail through the season sniffle-, cough-, and ache-free?

To read the full article 4 Secrets To Never Getting Sick, click here.
happiness159x170.jpg5 Ways To Increase Your Happiness

I’m not sure why, but most people are reluctant to admit they would like to increase their overall happiness. Maybe it’s because in doing so, one also has to confront the fact that they aren’t as happy as they would like to be – a vulnerable admission.

To read the full article 5 Ways To Increase Your Happiness, click here.
maturewoman127x170.jpgDoctors: Pap Remains Best Test For Cervical Cancer

Scientists advising the government say a Pap test is a good way to screen young and middle-aged women for cervical cancer, and it's only needed once every three years. But they say there is not enough evidence yet to back testing for HPV, the virus that causes the disease.

To read the full article Doctors: Pap remains best test for cervical cancer, click here.
mammography120x170.jpgBusted! 8 Mammogram Truths Every Woman Must Know

Do mammograms save lives? Of course they do. But is mammography the surefire "fix" for the breast cancer problem that many women believe it to be? Unfortunately not, says Dr. Laura Esserman, director of the Carol Franc Buck Breast Care Center at the University of California at San Francisco.

To read the full article Busted! 8 Mammogram Truths Every Woman Must Know, click here.
sexmp-170x120.jpgDr. Donnica Moore discusses post-menopausal sex drive. A video form ABC News.

To read the full article Sex After Menopause, click here.
Brocolli-2-1A170x130.jpgEating more apples is linked to lower risk of distal colon cancer, brassicas like cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli and Brussels sprouts are linked to lower risk of cancer in both the proximal and the distal colon

To read the full article Different Fruits And Vegetables Affect Cancer Risk In Different Parts Of Bowel, click here.

depressedyoungwoman120x170.jpgDepression tied to stroke risk: What explains link?

Depression significantly increases the risks of having a stroke, and dying from it, according to a new study published in the September 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

To read the full article Depression tied to stroke risk, click here.
vegetbablelifestyle130x170.jpgPlant-Rich Diets Tied to Lower Breast Cancer Risk

Women with diets rich in vegetables, fruit and legumes may have a somewhat decreased risk of developing one type of breast cancer, a new study suggests.

To read the full article Plant-Rich Diets Tied to Lower Breast Cancer Risk, click here.
womanexercisebycycle140x170.jpg15 minutes of fitness a day can add 3 years to your life
Even a little bit of physical activity helps, study confirms and doing just 15 minutes of moderate exercise a day may add three years to your life, a large study in Taiwan has found.

To read the full article 15 minutes of fitness a day can add 3 years to your life, click here.
oldpills124-170.jpgOlder pills often safer but many think new is better, 4 in 10 wrongly believe the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approves only 'extremely effective' drugs, survey finds. 

Many consumers mistakenly believe new prescription drugs are always safer than those with long track records, and that only extremely effective drugs without major side effects win government approval, according to a new study.

To read the full article Older pills often safer but many think new is better, click here.
asthma-child170x120.jpgLow-Fat Yogurt Consumption Tied to Asthma and Hay Fever Risk in Kids, Says Study

A new study suggests a link between women's eating low-fat yogurt during pregnancy to an increased risk that their children will develop asthma and hay fever.

To read the full article Low-Fat Yogurt Consumption Tied to Asthma and Hay Fever Risk in Kids, Says Study, click here.
heartdxwoman170x134.jpgDr. Esselstyn Jr. didn't become a doctor to change the way America eats. He was a general surgeon. But researching cancer, he stumbled on a fact that changed his career: Certain cultures around the world do not suffer from heart disease, the No. 1 killer in the Western world.

To read the full article The 'heart attack proof' diet?, click here.
supermon114x170.jpgStudy finds that working moms are less depressed than stay-at-home counterparts. Working moms are less likely to show symptoms of depression than stay-at-home moms, a new study finds.

To read the full article Trying to Be 'Supermom' Can Raise Risk for Depression, click here.
ovarianCa134x170.jpgUsing a new approach to developing biomarkers for the very early detection of ovarian cancer, researchers at Rush University Medical Center have identified a molecule in the bloodstream of infertile women that could one day be used to screen for those at high risk for the disease — or even those with early-stage ovarian cancer.

To read the full article Antibody May Detect Ovarian Cancer, click here.
glutenfree170x170.jpgSpeculation on increase in digestive disorder centers on improvements in sanitation and hygiene. Complaints of celiac disease are on the rise in the United States, with more and more people growing ill from exposure to products containing gluten.

To read the full article Celiac Disease on the Rise in U.S., click here.
Yoga125x170.jpgWhat if you made ecstasy part of your daily spiritual practice? How would that change the richness and the quality of your life?

To read the full article Sexual Healing With Yoga, click here.
depressed-woman127x170.jpgAdult females with clinical depression are 29% more likely to suffer a stroke than other women of the same age without depression, according to an article published in the journal Stroke.

To read the full article Depression Raises Female Risk Of Stroke By 29%, click here.
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Possibly, there is nothing more problematic for women, then making the decision as to whether or not to have their annual pap smear.

To read the compete article  Pap Smear Fear, click here.

heartattack170x150.jpgThe most common killer of women is also the most common killer of men. Just as with men, this killer is more often then not, a silent killer.

To read the full article Leading Killer of Women is a “Man’s Disease”, click here.
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To Lower Your Heart Disease Risk, Get Happy

Those most content with their lives had 13 percent lower risk of heart disease, study finds that feeling satisfied with your life may be good for your heart, a new study says.

To read the full article To Lower Your Heart Disease Risk, Get Happy,  click here.

Meditation-Death-177x170.jpgMeditation And The Fear Of Death

Somewhere in The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying it says (loosely) that the purpose of life is to prepare for death. A somewhat morbid statement, think about how profound a message it actually is.

To read the full article Meditation And The Fear Of Death, click here.
meditationpain170x130.jpgWant to Reduce Pain? Try Meditation

Since the 1960s, meditation has been the focus of increasing scientific research. In over 1,000 published research studies, various methods of meditation have been linked to changes in metabolism, blood pressure, brain activation, and other bodily processes. Now, meditation has been used in clinical settings as a method of stress and pain reduction.

To read the full article Want to Reduce Pain? Try Meditation, click here.
marriage40170x130.jpgNot married by 40 no longer means you are a spinster, in fact it means you are part of a growing trend of those who say over 40 is the best time to say "I do."

To read the full article  First @ 40, click here.

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In a recent study performed at Johns Hopkins it was found that sexually active American women should be tested for a vaginal parasite STD called Trichomonas vaginalis.

To read the complete article STD’s - Women Over 40, click here.

bubblegum170x134.jpg5 Bad Habits You Don't Need to Break

Sometimes you’ve just got to be bad. You know, let a few swear words fly or doodle to your heart’s content while you’re supposed to be listening. Maybe you even chew gum in the face of a no-gum policy at work.

To read the full article 5 Bad Habits You Don't Need to Break, click here.
holding170x170.jpgAre Cuddles the Key to Relationship Happiness?

Yep, you heard it right, ladies and gentlemen, the key to long-term happiness with your mate just may be cuddling…and kissing and caressing, according to a new study from the famed Kinsey Institute at Indiana University.

To read the full article Are Cuddles the Key to Relationship Happiness?, click here.
gazpacho170x114.jpg6 Best Summer Foods for Weight Loss
Lighten up your diet this summer with these refreshing foods and drinks.

You don’t need to starve yourself on a wacky fad diet if you want to look better in your shorts or swimsuit this summer.

To read the full article 6 Best Summer Foods for Weight Loss, click here.

For a great recipe for a tasty gazpacho soup, click here.
beer170x130.jpg14 "Facts" about Drinking: Are You Misinformed?

CBS slide show regarding 14 facts about drinking alcohol that are either commonly misunderstood,  false or lead to unexpected problems.

To read the full article 14 "Facts" about Drinking: Are You Misinformed?, click here.
salt170x134.jpgCutting Salt Might Not Help Heart, study says

Salty snackers may have reason to rejoice. A new study suggests cutting back on dietary salt intake won't cut risk of heart disease, contrary to popular belief.

To read the full article Cutting Salt Might Not Help Heart, click here.
redwinetallglass92x170.jpgRed wine is "exercise in a bottle," study suggests

Can red wine offset the negative health effects of a sedentary lifestyle? A new study suggests wine can be "exercise in a bottle."

To read the full article Red Wine is "Exercise in a Bottle, click here.
gril135x170.jpg8 Scary Health Risks in Your Own Backyard

This summer your back yard can be a dangerous place. You or a family member could get hurt, so consider areas of potential danger and fix them now before they create a problem for you or your family.

To read the full article 8 Scary Health Risks in Your Own Backyard, click here.
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Gluten Allergy Linked to Earlier Menopause

Study finds estrogen levels are generally lower in women with celiac disease. Women with untreated celiac disease may hit menopause earlier, and have a higher risk of some pregnancy complications, than women without the disease, suggests a small study.

To read the full article Gluten Allergy Linked to Earlier Menopause, click here.
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Older Women With Breast Cancer Probably Won't Die From It: Study


Heart disease more likely cause of death, researchers find.

Older women with breast cancer are more likely to die from cardiovascular disease and other causes than from their cancer, a new study finds.

To read the full article Older Women With Breast Cancer Probably Won't Die From It: Study, click here.
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The discovery that many people with life problem or occasional bad moods would willingly dose themselves with antidepressants sailed the drug industry through the 2000s.

To read the full article Selling Depression, click here.
iud138x170.jpgIUDs Officially Recommended for Healthy Women, Teens

New guidelines say research shows this form of birth control is safe and effective

A female contraceptive device whose reported side effects kept it off the frontline of birth control for years has been formally endorsed for all healthy adult women and adolescents by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

To read the full article IUDs Officially Recommended for Healthy Women, Teens, click here.
farrah-ryanstress115x170.jpgFarrah Fawcett cancer tied to stress? Maybe, says Ryan O'Neal

Did psychological stress cause the cancer that killed Farrah Fawcett? Ryan O'Neal thinks it's a possibility.

To read the full article Farrah Fawcett cancer tied to stress?, click here.

OsteoporosisSpineDecay-1a120x170.jpgOsteoporosis is a serious medical problem that affects a significant number of both women and men. Both woman and men can develop osteoporosis, and therefore both must take positive actions to first prevent and then, if and when osteoporosis does occur, to reverse it.  One of the main problems in doing this is finding the exact right information to help them personally.

There are 6 articles in theis series. In order to read the entire series of articles we suggest that you start with the first article in this series, About Osteoprosis, click here.

legcramp.jpgSince there is no single accepted standard medical treatment for nocturnal leg cramps a holistic approach may be of value for you.

If you have recurrent leg cramps it might well help to do some or all of the following:

To read the full article Leg Cramps: A Holistic Remedies and Self Care Approach, click here.

legcramping-1.jpgLeg cramps are an involuntary contraction of one or more muscles in one or both legs. They may range from only being slightly uncomfortable to extremely painful.

To read the full artricle A Medical-Holistic Approach To Leg Cramps, click here.

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Article by Noata Hashimoto, D.C.

From snake oil to mainstream, the vitamin-mineral and herbal supplement industry is here to stay. For most lay people it can be difficult to determine what exactly you need and from which source when there are thousands of companies to choose from.

To read the full article Vitamin Industry Fraud , click here.
fitnesstraining.jpgArticle by Dennis Mason, B.F.A., C.P.T.

It never ceases to amaze me how many people want to get into better shape, but always seem to find reasons why they cannot. “Oh, I work all the time,” is probably the all-time number one reason given.

To read the full article Make Your Health Priority One, click here.
swimmersear-1b170x192.jpgSwimmer's Ear Responsible for Nearly a Half Billion in Health Care Costs
CDC works to educate public about preventing this common ailment


Swimmer's ear leads to about 2.4 million doctor visits each year and is responsible for nearly $500 million dollars in annual health care costs, according to estimates released by CDC on Thursday.

To read the full article Swimmer's Ear Responsible for Nearly a Half Billion, click here.
prayer-160x170.jpgMost of us have been taught that prayer can help us get what we most desire. New studies are now suggesting that it can also help us solve certain medical problems. One of the problems is high blood pressure and it seems that prayer may be a great help in controlling blood pressure and even lowering it when its high. The following video tells us more about this.

To watch Praying for Health, click here.

10waysbp130x170.jpgPeople with high blood pressure (hypertension) often need several medications. But lifestyle changes can ratchet it down too, and maybe even eliminate the need for drugs.

To read the full article 10 Natural Ways to Lower Blood Pressure, click here.

illwoman170x150.jpgA recent study looked at post menopausal women to determine what role loss of sexual desire played in their life. It seems that loss of sex drive was associated with a decreased quality of life and increase risk of illness.

To read the full article Health Declines With Sex Drive, click here.

breastself-exam120x170.jpgOver the past years there has been considerable controversy regarding screening fro breast cancer. Some experts say you should have mammographies other say that you do not need them. Some experts tell you that you should be doing regular Breast Self-Examinations, while other experts tell you they are unnecessary and can create problems for you.

To read the full article Screening For Breast Cancer, click here.

Melanoma-6-170x170.jpgOver the past few decades, the incidence of melanoma, one of the deadliest forms of skin cancer, has been steadily increased. The fact is, melanoma has become the most common cancer in women between the ages of 25 and 29.

To read the full article Melanoma Is on the Rise in Women, click here.

hipfractue170-160.jpgWhether you love your hips or hate them, a woman's hips are a vital part of her daily life. Keeping them healthy is important to her over all health and well-being.

To read the full article Hip Fractures: What Women Need to Know, click here.

RecurrentBladderInfections-1.jpgAs a Holistic Gynecologist, I have to take issue with the latest issue specifically with a column by Dr. Donohue their Medical Columnist. Dr. Donahue’s column in the latest edition, April 17, 2011, was based on question by a reader regarding bladder infections, “Bladder Infections Are Bane of Women.”To read the entire article When Bladder Infections Are Not Cured, click here.
leakybladder180x140.jpgWhere's the loo? Excess coffee linked to leaky bladder
Study: 4 or more cups of java or 10 cans of soda a day may increase urinary incontinence

Women who down a lot of caffeinated drinks each day may have a slightly increased risk of developing urinary incontinence, a new study suggests. The results add to conflicting evidence on whether caffeine worsens a common condition.

To read the full article Where's the loo? Excess coffee linked to leaky bladder, click here.
oralsex180x120.jpgOral Sex Linked To Head And Neck Cancers

Oral cancer used to be something that happened mostly to male, smokers over 50. Today, cancers of the head and neck are being linked to HPV, a main cause of cervical cancer in young people. The rise in oral sex may be to blame for this significant rise in tongue, tonsils and other oral cancers.

To read the full article Oral Sex Linked To Head And Neck Cancers, click here.
dukendiet-180x140.jpgDukan Diet: Bad breath, constipation and sex appeal?

It warns of bad breath, constipation and fatigue, but the Dukan Diet also comes with a big promise - to make you thin really quickly.

To read the full article Dukan Diet: Bad breath, constipation and sex appeal, click here.
Doctor-1.jpgWhy see a Holistic Gynecologist instead of a regular gynecologist? In the past most women only thought about seeing their gynecologist either when it was time for the routine pelvic exam and pap smear or they had a gynecologic problem.To read the entire article When Do You See A Holistic Gyn? click here.
CaPills-Milk-180x140.jpgCalcium Supplements Linked to Increased Heart Attack Risk in Post-Menopausal Women

Millions of post menopausal women are using calcium supplements to protect them against osteoporosis. Are these supplements helping them or increasing their risk of heart disease. This is the focus of a recent study performed at the University of Auckland in New Zealand. To read the entire article Calcium Supplements and Heart Attack Risk, click here.
strawberrys-100x140.jpgFrozen Strawberries, Key To Throat Cancer Prevention

In a country where there is the highest incidence of throat, or esophageal cancer, Chinese researchers have found that simple strawberries may be an affordable and commonly found prevention tool to stave off this deadly disease.

To read the full article Frozen Strawberries, Key To Throat Cancer Prevention, click here.
propecia140x100.jpgHair-growth drug tied to male sexual problems

Propecia can cause persistent sexual dysfunction well after consumers stop the medication. Your plans for a new thick head of hair to restore your confidence and sexual allure just might backfire.

To read the full article Hair-growth drug tied to male sexual problems, click here.

meditation-pain190x140.jpgBrain Imaging Shows Impact of Brief Mindfulness Meditation Training. Even very brief instruction in meditation appears to help people cope with pain, and a newly published brain imaging study may explain why.

To read the full article Meditation May Reduce Pain, click here.
workaholic100x140.jpgHeart disease hits workaholics hard: Are you at risk?

If you're reading this at work, go home. That's the advice from new research showing that working long hours can dramatically increase your risk for heart attack.

To read the full article Heart disease hits workaholics hard: Are you at risk?, click here.
bladder-cancer190x140.jpgA new study suggests using over-the-counter Non Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory medications can reduce your risk of bladder cancer by more then 40%. Also, a few other helpful tips to prevent bladder and other cancers.

To read the full article Preventing Bladder Cancer, click here.
hypothyroidism190x150.jpgIn the previous articles from this series we looked at low thyroid (or hypothyroidism) and menopause and then the relationship between thyroid dysfunction, stress and the adrenal glands. In this article we will look at the role of nutrition and other factors in healthy thyroid function and of course ion hyperthyroidism.

The Role of Nutrition in Preventing and Treating Hypothyroidism


Inadequate nutrition can play both a causative and disrupting role in thyroid function. Certain vitamins and minerals are essential for thyroid production. Most people are aware of the role of iodine in leading to hypothyroidism. In areas of the world, or our country, where the diet is deficient in iodine there is often an increased risk of goiter (thyroid tumors) and hypothyroid disease.  This problem as generally been resolved in the US by using Iodinized salt. If you are not using iodinized salt, you should be as it can help to keep your thyroid functioning optimally.

Another important mineral is selenium. Selenium is needed for the conversion of T4(thyroxin) into T3 (triiodothyronine). If an individuals diet is deficient in selenium then this can lead to hypothyroidism. By increasing this selenium in your diet or as a supplement, this may make a difference in how you feel. Vitamin A, EPA (Eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (Docosahexaenoic acid), and zinc are all involved in thyroid hormone metabolism in helping T3 bind inside your cells. These nutrients are essential part of your body’s natural metabolic pathways for making and using thyroid hormone. These vitamins, minerals, along with omega-3 fatty acids, and extra antioxidants can help your thyroid function effectively. The bottom line is that when you give your body the right nutrients, you will optimize your thyroid function.

Natural Hypothyroid Relief


Menopause is a time of profound changes, it can stress both your body and your mind. It can play havoc on your thyroid. When any major system of the body is out of balance the stress can effect your thyroid and if the stress is significant and prolonged hypothyroidism can be created. As always, the best way to restore healthy thyroid function is by finding the problem, understanding and resolving it. Since thyroid replacement hormones are easy to get too often physicians will simply prescribe them and forget or not include all of the other vitamins, minerals, micro-nutrients and dietary changes that may be needed to support returning your thyroid to its highest level of normal functioning.

While remember that a healthy diet is your first line of defense here are some things you can do to prevent hypothyroidism, correct if it has already occurred:

Since a healthy diet also offset many other problems that affect your thyroid gland, it is essential to eat a very healthy diet, the healthiest diet you can possibly eat. Lots of fresh fruits and vegetables, lean meats and stay away from processed and refined foods as they will deplete many of the nutrients which are essential in order for your body to run optimally.

A good healthy diet will also support your adrenal glands. This will benefit your overall health on many levels. Not only will this support your adrenal glands but it will also lighten the burden on your thyroid, it will also help restore your energy levels and overall well-being.

By taking in an adequate amount of high quality multivitamin–minerals this will help perimenopausal and menopausal women, to optimize their diet as well as their overall vitamin-mineral needs. This can then ensure a strong foundation of optimal nutrients to help support the regular production and function of your thyroid gland and the adequate production of thyroid hormones, This can help you to prevent hypothyroidism.

If your thyroid hormones are already low you should consider supplementing your diet with selenium and iodine. You can do this through eating foods high in these minerals or with over-the-counter supplements. Your doctor can help you to monitor your iodine and selenium levels. We do not recommend taking more than 200 mcg/day of selenium total in any or all of your supplements.

Find ways to diminish stress and speak your truth. By the time many women reach perimenopause, they may often find that they have given so much of themselves to the world around them that we often have little or no reserves left over for themselves. It may be necessary to reduce your work load or at least work smarter. It may help to stop lying to yourself, see the world, your family, friends and co-workers as they really are, Speak up and share your opinions if this is important to you. Explore those activities and goals that really make your life meaningful. Don’t feel guilty about asking for and receiving help or support. Learn to say “no” when you want to say no. Reduce the stress in your life.

If you make these changes and your thyroid hormone levels still aren’t right (or you’re still experiencing symptoms despite “normal” TSH), then it is worth considering a trial of thyroid replacement or in this case supplementation to see if your thyroid is running too low for your needs.  While many women take synthetic levothyroxine and do well, some women do not get the relief they need. In our practice we predominantly use natural thyroid hormones, such as Armour Thyroid, WestThroid or Nature-Throid. In some women for certain reasons they may do better with compounded T3 and T4, where the dosage is individualized in the exact amounts these women need for maximum benefit. The combination of T3 and T4, whether in Armour, WestThroid or Nature-Throid often makes a big difference for many women suffering from symptoms of  hypothyroidism. While some standard Western practitioners consider these natural and compounded forms of thyroid as controversial, and some are even unwilling to prescribe them, we have worked with thousands of men and women and find that they are more often the not the best way to get a sluggish thyroid taken care of. Armour Thyroid, WestThroid or Nature-Throid are biologic products coming from pork thyroid hence they are also a food. In twenty years I have never seen one problem with the exception of people who do not eat meat, or for religious reasons do not want to eat pork or have an allergy to pork.

The Deeper Meaning Of The Thyroid

In the oriental or Eastern medical construct, the thyroid is often  associated with the “sacred voice.” It is often a component of the fifth chakra. Hence, in Body Symptoms Language, unresolved issues that ultimately affect the thyroid are often linked to difficulty speaking our higher truth, inability to follow our dreams, or to fully express ourselves to tell others who we are and what we are all about.

Anatomically, the thyroid sits directly over the voice box, and therefore one of the symptoms of thyroid dysfunction can be a gravelly or “muted” voice. When the thyroid is underactive, it is important to step back and evaluate how well you are expressing your higher needs, your wants, and your opinions about those around you.

Our voice isn’t simply serve to be used to communicate words, as is the thyroid, it is connected to our entire or whole being. Your thyroid doesn’t just produce thyroid hormone, it is connected to every cell in your body and it plays a role in both our physical and our psychological worlds. If your thyroid is out of balance, your whole world or possibly a substantial part of it may also be out of balance. When you resolve the issues that throw your world out of balance your thyroid will likely return to its balance. Unfortunately, if you simply use drugs or even natural thyroid supplements or medications to rebalance your thyroid this may not be enough to rebalance the rest of your life. However, it can help you to at least reduce negative symptoms, wake up and allow you healthy time to fix what needs to be fixed. and you will find the dynamic balance your body is naturally desiring.

Where Do I Start?


If your thyroid is not working well and you are suffering from low thyroid the place to start is by using natural thyroid hormonal replacement. This means using Armour Thyroid, WestThroid or Nature-Throid natural thyroid replacement at a dosage that is right for your needs. Next, if you are not already doing it, is to eat a basically healthy diet. If you are not or you or your physician believe that you are nutritionally deficient than add to the above a balanced array of nutritional supplements designed to replace whichever nutrients are deficient.

Next, work with your practitioner to establish not just “normal” but optimal blood levels of thyroid. Since the range of blood levels for thyroid hormones can be very wide, simply being in the normal range may not be enough. You can be within the “normal” range and still be at the lower end of the “normal” range which might still be too low for you.

You are really only “normal” when you feel as if you are doing great. We talk about this as being in the “optimal” range. That is whatever your blood level is you are doing the very best possible for your needs and chemistry. While one person may do well at the lower end of the “normal” range another may be doing poorly. We use the lab values not to decide if you are “normal” or “abnormal” bust only as a guide so that in the future we can have sense of what blood level you will feel best at, your “optimal”blood level.

We generally we use only three blood functions when we are following our low thyroid patients:

1. TSH or Thyroid Stimulating Hormone, which we talked about in article #1
2. Free T3 (Free Triiodothyronine)
3. Free T4 (Free Thyroxin)

If you remember from our prior articles T3 is the active thyroid hormone we usually talk about as “thyroid hormone.” T4, is the thyroid hormone mad by your thyroid gland and in order for the body to use it, it must first be converted, using some special enzymes, into T3.

The standard range of TSH (please note your lab may have different normal based on the type of test used to determine the TSH level) is

TSH         035 to 4.0 mIU/L
Free T3    2.3 to 4.4 pg/mL
Free T4    0.61 to 1.76 ng/dL

Using these normals we consider if Free T3 is between 3.0 and 4.4 the individual is more than likely within their optimal range. This assumes that they tolerate this level with no individual of symptoms or hyperthyroidism such as rapid heart rate, palpitations, tremor, trembling hands, heat intolerance,  nervousness, insomnia, breathlessness, increased bowel movements, light or absent menstrual periods, fatigue, weight loss, muscle weakness, warm moist skin, hair loss,
or staring gaze.

Nutrients and Foods That Can Help Your Maintain A Healthy Thyroid
  • Iodine (I): seaweed (e.g., nori), clams, shrimp, haddock, oysters, salmon, sardines, pineapple, eggs.
  • Selenium (Se): smoked herring, smelt, wheat germ, Brazil nuts (just one nut provides ~139 mcg), apple cider vinegar, scallops, barley, lobster.
  • Zinc (Zn): fresh oysters, ginger root, pecans, dry split peas, Brazil nuts, egg yolk, whole wheat, rye, oats, peanuts.
  • Vitamin E: wheat germ oil, olive oil, sunflower seeds, almonds, peanuts.
  • Vitamin A: dark green leafy veggies, liver, winter squash, cantaloupe, stone fruits, papaya, and cod liver oil.
  • B vitamin complex: brewer’s yeast, wild rice, brown rice, whole wheat, beans, peanuts.
  • Vitamin C: Red chili, guava, parsley, dark green leafy veggies, strawberries, papaya, citrus fruits.

To return to article #1-Hypothyroidism in Menopause, A Holistic Approach, click here.

 

woman190x160.jpgResearchers Say Study Points Out ‘Missed Opportunities’ to Prevent Heart Disease

You’re a 40 plus years of age woman and you have just found out that you have high blood pressure, what do you do about it? You take steps to lower your blood pressure of course? Or do you? Many women in fact do not. But is this healthy in the long run?

For years doctors have preached that both men and women should lower their blood pressure if they have a diagnosis of high blood pressure, but we had little evidence that this was actually the right thing to do. Now a new study suggests that middle-aged women who take steps to lower their blood pressure could significantly reduce their risk of having a stroke, heart attack, or developing heart failure.

A group of researchers now say they found that high systolic pressure, that is the blood pressure when the heart contracts, is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease and its complications in middle-aged and older women.

They report that 36% of serious cardiovascular events such as heart attacks and strokes are preventable by lowering blood pressure in women. This is striking when compared to the fact that only 24% of men will likely benefit from the same treatment programs.

Investigators examined data from 9,357 adults in 11 countries in Europe, Asia, and South America for a median of 11 years. The researchers looked for absolute and relative risks of cardiovascular disease that were associated with systolic blood pressure. There study ultimately suggest that three major risk factors account for 85% of the modifiable risk for heart disease in men and women, 1)  high systolic (the top number) blood pressure, 2) high cholesterol, and 3) smoking. Of these three  high systolic pressure clearly appears to be the most important risk factor, according to their research.

Prevention of Heart Disease

Doctor, Jan A. Staessen, MD, PhD, of the University of Leuven in Belgium stated as this report was released,  “I was surprised by the study findings that highlight the missed opportunities for prevention of heart disease in older women.” He told reporters that the research team found that a relatively small increase of 15 points in systolic blood pressure could increase the risk of cardiovascular disease by 56% in women and 32% in men.

During this study, researchers looked at blood pressure, measuring blood pressure at set intervals for 24 hours during a person’s daily routine and when they slept, as well as conventional blood pressure readings taken in doctors’ offices. The researchers reported that ambulatory blood pressure readings have less potential for error and provide more accurate estimates of usual blood pressure and prognosis for cardiovascular disease.

The monitor used for ambulatory readings was a small, portable device programmed to take blood pressures at specific intervals. In the study, ambulatory readings were taken at intervals of 15 to 30 minutes during the daytime, and 30 to 45 minutes at night.

According to the researchers, nighttime readings were better predictors of heart disease than daytime readings because the readings taken at night were more standardized. Blood pressures taken at night are less likely to be influenced by physical activity.

Quality of Life

Dr. Staessen suggested, “It is recognized that women live longer than men, but that older women usually report lower quality of life than men. By lowering systolic pressure by 15 [points] in hypertensive women, there would be an increased benefit in quality of life by prevention of cardiovascular disease.”

The researchers suggested that women and their doctors ought to become more aggressive in diagnosing and treating high systolic blood pressure.

For more information on what high blood pressure is and how to treat it holistic treatment of high blood pressure, click on respective links.

 

oldcouple150x150.jpgHeart Attack Risk: Can Sex Over Tax Your Heart?
New Study Finds Spike in Risk During and Right After Sex, but Overall Benefit


For years both men and women have worried about whether having sex can increase their risk of having a heart attack. Now, new research from Tufts Medical Center published recently in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests that sex can and may increase the risk of a heart attack, but that this risk is quite small and only occurs during and right  after having sex.

In this study researchers looked at heart attack victims, mostly men in their 50s and 60s, who were questioned about their activities just before or during having a heart attack. The researches want to see how often sex served as at rigger for a cardiac event. While they found that sexual activity caused a 2.7increased risk of heart attack, they ultimately suggested that this risk rate was quite small and should not dissuade individuals with heart disease from indulging in sex. While this study suggested that there was indeed an increased risk, several other studies had previously suggested that regular sexual activity (defined as two or more times a week) actually decreases one's risk of heart attack over time.

Dr. Issa Dahabreh, the lead researcher on this study told reporters, “People shouldn't take this new report to mean the sex is harmful for those with heart disease, because the absolute risk is really small." The study suggested that individuals could ultimately decrease this risk by being physically active on a regular basis. Regular exercise made sex and other types of physical exertion less likely to be a trigger for heart attack. Co-author Jessica Paulus, an epidemiologist at the Harvard School of Public Health, reported, there is "a 45 percent reduction in the relative risk of heart attack with every additional weekly exercise session."

Regular exercise training, especially when it relates to cardio respiratory fitness… “will markedly reduce the risk associated with both acute exercise/exertion as well as sexual activity," says Dr. Chip Lavie, medical director of Cardiac Rehabilitation and Prevention at John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute.

Many people with “heart disease” are very fearful of returning to normal types of physical activity following a heart attack or stroke. They often believe that sex carries an increased risk because of both physical exertion and emotional excitement which is generally part of the sexual experience, and because of this they may be very apprehensive about returning to a normal active sex life.

This conflicting information regarding whether sex is good or bad for the heart doesn't make this situation much easier.  Many specialist believe that anything that increase heart rate and blood pressure could put a strain on the heart and those who are not used to being physically fit then may be at a higher risk of a cardiac event.

In a 2010 study published in the Lancet, researchers found that sex served as a trigger in only 2.2 percent of heart attacks. By comparison, indulging in a heavy meal was connected with triggering 2.7 percent of heart attacks. What's more, the emotional and physical benefits of sexual satisfaction have been linked in several studies to overall health and specifically cardiac health.

In another 2010 study published in the American Journal of Cardiology, a group of men between the ages of 50 and 70, were followed for 16 years and quizzed about sexual activity. Researchers found that sex twice a week reduced the risk of heart disease in these men by as much as 45 percent, when compared to peers who had sex only once a month or less.

Dr. Mehmet Oz, heart surgeon and host of the "Dr. Oz show," is also famous for recommending frequent sex (three times a week) as a way for men decrease their risk of heart attack and stroke by 50 percent.

In the end most researches now agree that the exertion of a romp in the bedroom may briefly increase risk of heart attack in some men, especially those men who do not exercise regularly, but the cardiovascular and emotional benefits of regular sexual satisfaction far outweigh the downside, especially in those who are regularly active in other ways as well.

As one researcher put it, "The bottom line is that people should not fear sexual activity, but should fear sedentary lifestyle and physical inactivity."

For more information on What is a Heart Attack?, click here.

fibrocysticbreasts190x200.jpgFibrocystic breast disease is almost an epidemic in America. It's uncomfortable and worry some because your breasts develop these weird knobby cysts that not only feel strange, may be painful but worry you because they could be cancer. The fact is fibrocystic changes in the breast are quite common. Many women (and even an occasional men) can develop fibrocystic breast disease. While they are not breast cancer, and rarely ever turn into breast cancer, they are often associated with ovarian cysts and uterine fibroid tumors. The reason for this is simple, it is because the underlying cause of fibrocystic breast disease and these other health concerns, generally have the same origin, an excess of the female hormone estrogen or what is often referred to as estrogen excess or estrogen dominance. Because of this over-stimulation of the breasts by an excess of estrogen either created in the body or caused by taking estrogen hormone replacement, some women get such painful breasts that their breast can't even be touched and the simple act of wearing a bra can be excruciatingly uncomfortable.

Too Much Estrogen From the Out Side

Since there are two problems that can cause fibrocystic breasts each has to be treated differently. If it is caused by too much “exogenous” estrogen (that is, estrogen taken orally with hormone replacement, or birth control pills; or by injection, patch or other source such as a medication or in a cosmetic formulation) this has to be considered and the dosage adjusted correctly to undue the increased stimulation of the breasts caused by the mediation or in the cosmetics.

While this is often a simple matter, it is not always a simple thing to do. This is especially true when estrogen is used to treat one problem while making another problems, fibrocystic changes in the breast, a new problem.

Too Much Estrogen From the In Side


A great majority of the women with fibrocystic breasts have this problem because their body is making too much estrogen, or their body is making the right amount estrogen but they have become too sensitive, to the estrogen their body is making.  Most commonly they become estrogen sensitive because of chemical changes in their body that stimulates estrogen production and hence create estrogen dominance which then acts to over stimulate their body.

There are a number of reasons why this happens and one of the main factors is foods and chemicals we eat or ingest that overstimulate estrogen production or interfere with the normal breakdown or excretion of estrogen, hence causing estrogen levels within the woman’s body to rise and over stimulate her breasts, uterus, ovary and other organs. One of the most common problems women suffer from is Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS), which occurs for this very same reason. It is also interesting that there is a strong relationship between PMS and fibrocystic disease of the breasts.

Balancing Your Estrogen and Progesterone


While we think of too much estrogen as being the main problem we also need to consider that when estrogen and progesterone, also a female hormone are in balance, PMS and fibrocystic breasts are much less of a problem. Progesterone acts to reduce the over-stimulation so that when either too much estrogen is being produced to too little progesterone is being made then fibrocystic breast and PMS are a much grater problem.

Dietary Reasons for Fibrocystic Breast Disease

Certain foods and chemicals act to either stimulate estrogen production or decrease estrogen breakdown which helps to maintain control over estrogen levels.

In order to help reduce over-stimulation of the breasts we recommend the following:
  • Avoid coffee another caffeinated products (except for green tea) as they cause estrogen levels to rise.
  • Avoid alcohol as all alcohol beverage cause estrogen levels to rise.
  • Avoid eating or drinking anything hot in plastic containers
  • Take an excellent probiotic, probiotics help to fix the underlying cause by allowing your body to eliminate the excess estrogens.
  • Avoid eating unfermented soy products like tofu, soy milk, meat substitutes and soy protein
  • Ensure you have sufficient fiber in your diet in order to bind excess estrogens in your colon so they cannot be reabsorbed.
  • Avoid antibiotics (unless you absolutely need them as they also can effect estrogen breakdown and excretion)
  • Avoid foods that your body has any type of sensitivity to (get tested if you don't know)
  • Increase your intake of broccoli and cabbage, they help reduce estrogen levels
  • Take a high quality product containing DIM (diindolemethane, a derivative of cabbage) and Ca-D glucarate. They can help a lot.
  • Make sure you are not constipated, and I mean not at ALL constipated
  • Take at least 2000-5000 IU's of a high quality vitamin D each and every day
  • Take at least 100-300 mgs of a high quality, highly absorbable CoQ10 each and every day

One secret weapon rarely talked bout by medical doctors is iodine or iodide. For most women, 50 milligrams daily should help a lot. Many women are deficient in iodine and iodide in America. Breast tissues are extremely sensitive to iodine and iodide and require both to function adequately. Most men and women deficient in iodine and iodide have high, toxic, tissue levels of halides. Halides belong to a family of chemicals which include fluoride/fluorine, chloride/chlorine, bromide and bromine. When individuals are deficient in iodine/iodide their body is more receptive to the halides and will tend to absorb them more easily. Halides then bind onto the iodine/iodide receptors blocking iodine/iodide form binding and doing their good work. If halides have reached high levels then it may be necessary to take high doses of iodine/iodide for a while to force out toxic halides and allow your body to properly metabolize and use iodine/iodide. Bromines are commonly found in white bread products since they are used as an anti-caking agent. Splenda is a chlorine molecule bound to sugar using Splenda regularly can result in toxic halide levels. Men and women who swim or drink chlorine treated water are also subject to iodine deficiency.  Finally, fluoride toothpaste and water with fluoride can also cause halide toxicity which can end up allowing increased estrogen levels which can overstimulate the breasts, uterus, ovaries, thyroid and your metabolism in general.

These for we strongly suggest restricting foods, water, toothpastes that are high in fluorides, bromides and bromines.

Hormone Replacement


While all of the above are important. They can quickly be overshadowed if you are talking too much estrogen in your hormone replacement therapy, using birth control pills that are estrogen dominant or using topical hormone creams or salves for your skin that are high in estrogen. When ever estrogen is taken in any form, it must be counterbalanced by an equal or greater amount of progesterone. Often one of the simplest treatments for immediate treatment of breast pain is adding more progesterone orally or topically to the mix. This is not the end, this simply allows you to be more comfortable while you initiate the other steps listed above.

We also strongly recommend that other than modifying and improving your diet as stated above, do not try to manipulate and or adjust hormone levels on your own. This can lead to larger more dangerous problems. Find a competent physician who can help you and understands your needs and how to help you get there.

For more information on Fibrocystic Disease of the Breasts, click here.

 

MenopauseExercise190-150.jpgYou want to exercise but you are not sure of exactly what to do, what is safe and how not to hurt yourself? This video made at MD Anderson Medical Center might just help you with some new ideas and information on what to do and how to make sure your efforts are rewarded. Learn about the proper exercise techniques by a fitness expert who will show you how to do it right!

To see the video: 7-Day Exercise Plan Video, click here.
datingcouples190x127.jpgSingle Ladies, Don't Despair: Men Do Want to Commit
Surprising Survey Turns Around Conventional Wisdom On Men and Women


Recently one of the largest and most comprehensive study looking at singles in the United States produced some very surprising results. The study “Single in America” was performed by the  U.S. Census Bureau and was commissioned Match.com.

The “Single in America” study included 5,200 single men and women between the ages of 21 and 65.

Dr. Helen Fisher of the Institute of Evolutionary Studies at Binghamton University helped to conduct the survey in conjunction with the Census Bureau.

As the study was released Fisher who is also the chief scientific advisor for Chemistry.com, a division of Match.com told reporters,  "We've known for a long time that we're seeing growing economic equality between the sexes, but it was surprising to me that men are adopting some of the attitudes that we've long attributed to women, and women are adopting the attitudes that we've long attributed to men."

It appears according to Fisher, that men are often  stereotyped as being less interested in settling down and having children than women, but the study shows otherwise.

"Men,” Fisher said, “are just as eager to marry or more eager to marry as women are. It's not true that they don't want to commit. Particularly young men, age 21 to 34, are more eager to marry than women are.” Fisher continued, “Men are more eager to have children than women are."

According to the study, 51% of men and 46% of women want to have children between the ages of 21 and 34, which are peak reproductive years.

"Men also fall in love faster, they're more likely to bring a woman home to introduce her to their parents sooner, they're more likely to marry a woman who's got everything they're looking for in a partner” says Fisher.

The study also found that 54% of men say they have experienced love at first sight, as compared to only 41% of women.

Women Are Experiencing 'Tremendous Growth' in Independence

As women make more money, they are valuing their independence more, according to the survey. It may be that the days when marriage was the woman’s only option, are now simply no longer an issue.

Another interesting fact was that women appear to want more nights out with girlfriends than men want nights out with their male friends. Women also want to have their own bank accounts and go more on vacations by themselves than with their spouse or partner. Not only do they desire their new found economic growth, but they are also experiencing a tremendous growth in personal independence.

Currently statistic tell us that there are approximately ninety-six million American, nearly one third of all Americans, who are single. This new survey suggests that the happiest singles are those over the age of 65, and include among both men and women.

"In fact,” according to Fisher, the over 65 group are “the least likely to go into a committed relationship unless they have a deep sense of love and a deep sense of sexual desire. They want everything by then.”

The survey also found that people are a lot more open when it comes to expressing what they're looking for in a partner. When the study asked, “What must you have in a relationship?' and 'What's very important to you?' only 20% of men and 29% of women said that they must have, or it's very important to have, somebody of the same ethnic group. And even fewer men and women had to have somebody of the same religion," said Fisher.

The survey found that only 17% of men and 28% of women believe the religious background of their partner is very important. Prejudices are breaking down, but not just in terms of race and religion. Age difference in partners no longer seems as important, according to the survey.

"In fact something like 21% of women had a date with someone who was 10 or more years younger. We're seeing the decline of racism, of religious needs and age-ism," said Fisher.

"First of all, singles are very romantic. In fact I did a brain study and we found that romantic love can be sustained. The single most interesting thing in this study is that 35% of men and women said that they had initially met someone and not found them terribly attractive and they later felt passionately in love with them. So second looks may be an important part of meeting and choosing a long term partner.

Another interesting fact was that it appears that office romances are few, short and not usually destructive. In the past five years, only 12% of singles dated someone in their office. Most workplace romances lasted less than three months and only 6% of women dated their boss. After breaking up, 56% reported this romance did not affect their professional relationship. Thirty-six percent of singles would consider dating someone in the workplace.

Another interesting fact disclosed was that fidelity is a must. More than 69% of singles regard fidelity as a "must have." In 46% of the singles, where either one or both partners have been unfaithful, 78% of these relationships broke up after the discovery. 70% believe that divorce is acceptable after one or both partners cheat.

How does this information affect you?

 

arcus-Senilis190x160.jpgStaying healthy is one primary goal that few of us what to ignore. The truth is however, we do forget, lose sight of, and sometimes even, ignore. Who of us have not put ourselves in harms way from time to time. But it is up to us to recognize this and put ourselves back on tract for optimal health as soon as we recognize we have lost sight or ignored this process.
high fiber diet foods-2a.jpgI will bet that you have been wondering for  a long time what that high fiber diet you have been eating is doing for you. Maybe you know that it helps promote better bowel activity, reduces constipation and possibly you have heard that it reduces your risk of bowel cancer. “These are good!” You tell your self. “Good reasons to continue!”
Woman-BadVison-1a.jpgIn recent years there has been considerable interred in the role of omega 3's in preventing loss of vision and blindness. A new study using mice, now appears to give us a lot more information ads to how omega 3's can help save your vision.

HeartLecture-1

Heart attack and stroke are the #1 and #3 causes of death in the US. Both start many years before they actually can cause injury and/ or damage to the individual. Both are to a great degree preventable. In this article we will look at 10 ways you can help yourself to prevent, put off or even eliminate your risk for heart attacks or stroke.
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This is the second in a series of article on Sex and Menopause. While many women and a large number of their partners believe that once menopause occurs sex is a think of the past in this article we tell you why this happens and how to first prevent it and secondly resolve it if it has already in progress. No woman has to give up sex and partner has to find themself feeling left out.
 
To read the full article Your Sex Drive and Menopause, click here.

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Similar to the preceding article the group of medications now currently being used to prevent or treat osteoporosis appear to be demonstrating some previously unexpected benefits. In this article we look at the work of one research group which has found that these osteoporosis medications can reduce your risk for colon cancer.

To read the full article Women on Bone Drugs Have Less Colon Cancer, click here.

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Many men and women are unsure of medications now being prescribed for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. While they do have some important side effects and potential hazards in this article we look at a new study that suggest that those men and women taking them can abe adding as much as f years on to their life span.

To read the full article Osteoporosis Drugs Linked to Increased Lifespan, click here.

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This is the second in a series of article on Hypothyroidism: What it is, how it occurs, how it affects you and what you can do about it. In this article we look at Thyroid Function, Stress and Your Adrenal Glands as well as a number of commonly unsuspected facts that can cause hyperthyroidism.

To read the full article Thyroid Function, Stress and Your Adrenal Glands, click here.

 

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There are many causes for depression in this video presentation by Women’s Health Magazine you will find yet another unsuspected cause for depression. If you or a loved on are depressed and not sure what is causing, you may find this presentation interesting and valuable.

To read the full article A New Cause of Depression, click here.

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A recent study finds that one out of every five men in the United States get up at least twice a night to empty their bladders. The study suggests that for some of these men this problem could be an indication of  an underlying medical problem or that it could end up contributing to a reduction in overall health and well-being.

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Five Foods for Smoother, Softer, Healthier Skin


Winter can be tough on your skin, and you certainly need more than moisturizer to fight its effects.

To read the full article Five Foods for Smoother, Softer, Healthier Skin, click here.
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Going to Great Lengths for Beautiful Hair? Dermatologist Shares Hair Care Tips for Healthy and Damaged Hair

While the latest hairstyles and hair colors may look great, dermatologists warn that many women are subjecting their hair to harsh chemicals and heated styling devices that, in turn, can damage the hair.

To read the full article Going to Great Lengths for Beautiful Hair? Dermatologist Shares Hair Care Tips for Healthy and Damaged Hair, click here.

 

What Exactly is Constipation?


Constipation is a condition that most people have experienced, yet everyone has his or her own idea as to what it is. Generally, when we talk about being constipated we mean that the individual has hard stools that are difficult to pass. The term constipation also means infrequent bowel movement, that stools are not passing on a daily basis. Strictly speaking, the usual medical definition of constipation suggests that an individual is constipated if he or she has less than 3 bowel movements over a one week period. While many people normally have only one bowel movement every three days and this is often considered to be perfectly normal, a healthy individual with an adequate diet will generally have a normal bowel movement after each meal. This rarely happens in our society because few people eat normally. The usual American diet is almost entirely made up of too much processed and refined foods and hence has inadequate fiber and residue to create adequate stools. Therefore, a bowel movement every two or three days has become the norm. Constipation occurs when bowl movements are too hard, too small, infrequent or require too straining.

Other Myths About Bowel Movements?


Many people believe that regular bowel movements prevent the buildup of "toxins" in the colon and that these toxins are responsible for many important health problems. There is, however, no evidence at all that toxins are produced nor that they accumulate in the gastrointestinal tract (the bowels) nor that constipation itself causes any health problems. Many people swear that high colonic enemas cleansing and essential, yet we have no scientific evidence that this is in anyway true. On the contrary, overuse of enemas can lead to imbalances and  disturbances in the body which can lead to illness. On an occasional basis there is no evidence that enemas are in the least harmful.

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What Causes Constipation?


There are three causes for constipation
.


1.    Hard stools are created when the large intestine (the colon) removes too much water. This occurs when we drink too little water in our daily diet, or when we sweat or lose water from excessive work or exercise and this water is not replaced. When this happens the body tries to conserve water and removes as much as it can form our stools. Stools created this way can be very large and painful to pass and sometimes can cause tearing of the anal opening (i.e., an anal fissure). Hemorrhoids can develop or worsen and bleed.


2.    As mentioned above constipation also occurs as a by-product of what we eat or better still what we do not eat. Hence a diet which is high in processed and refined foods (white flour, white rice, instant potatoes, pastas, simple carbohydrates, sugars, etc.) and deficient in foods which are high in fiber such as vegetables, whole grains and fruits.


3.    The third reason combines several categories, it includes a sedimentary life style, not enough exercise, poor bowel habits, poor toilet training, use of medications such as codeine, Vicodin, high blood pressure medications, diuretics, antacids, tranquilizers or medication to relieve depression or slow down the digestive tract. Many over-the-counter drugs (such as cold and allergy preparations) can cause constipation. If these medications cannot be stopped then the above treatments are usually effective. These factors are mostly related to life style factors. There are also a host of anatomical problems and other medical conditions where in constipation is a symptom.

What Are the Symptoms of Constipation?


The most common symptoms are bloating, distention (swelling of the abdomen), and abdominal discomfort. Constipation can also lead to hemorrhoids, rectal pain and tearing of the rectal opening (fissures).

Diagnostic Tests


Constipation is decided on purely by the patients symptoms, no diagnostic testing is needed for mild or intermittent constipation. If constipation is new and there are obvious symptoms which go beyond simple constipation, then testing may be needed. In people over 40, a flexible sigmoidoscopy and barium enema (lower GI X-ray), occult blood evaluation should be performed to be sure colon cancer is not present. In long standing constipation of unknown cause, colonic marker studies can often show the problem to be related to a particular part of the colon, if so then specific treatment can then be started.


Treatment Of Constipation


1.    Diet: The best treatment should start with evaluation and changes in the diet. First of all, refined and processed foods should be decreased and high fiber content foods such as grains, vegetables and fruits should be increased in the diet. Food such as prunes can be used to stimulate the intestinal tract to move stools through itself faster. One to two tbsp. of bran flakes and powder can be added to foods or taken in juice twice daily. This may produce gas in some people.


2.    Fluids: Increase fluid intake to 6 to 10 8 oz glasses of water daily.


3.    Medications: If a high fiber diet is not possible, then fiber supplements such as Metamucil, Fibercon. methyl cellulose (2 grams),  Efferpsyllium may be used. All of these supplements contain psyllium (average dosage is 3.4 grams)which is the outer husk of a plant and can significantly increase the bulk of the stool. Citucel contains methyl cellulose and is also effective. All of these products work by increasing the amount of water in the stool, making the stools less hard and easier to pass. They should be taken 1 to 3 times daily as needed.


4.    Enemas: When dietary manipulation is not enough, enemas or laxatives may be needed. Small volume enemas such as Fleets enemas are often effective and safe to use periodically. These enemas are not "addictive" and do not harm the bowel. Laxatives should only be used occasionally, there is evidence that prolonged overuse can actually damage the colon and worsen constipation.


5.    Laxatives: Certain stimulant laxatives (cascara 4 to 8 ml once daily), bisacodyl (5 to 15 mg orally or 10 mg suppositories once daily), castor oil (15 to 45 ml daily) or Senna or phenolpthalein are over-the-counter products which are easily available with instructions. They all act by irritating the nerves of the colon once again medical studies suggest that repetitive use can damages the nerves in the colon. The other main group of laxatives are the "osmotic laxatives." They work by increasing the amount of water in the stool. These include Milk of Magnesia, Ducolax, Duphalac, CoLyte, etc. These laxatives are generally safe even when used chronically. However, individuals with kidney disease (and even older people without known kidney disease) can get high blood magnesium levels with Milk of Magnesia and this can be fatal.


6.    Exercise: Increase exercise, especially walking, can be helpful in stemming constipation.


7.    Medical Problems: If a medical problem such as bowel disease, relaxation of vaginal or rectal muscles or systemic disease is the cause then the specific problem should be treated.

 

For information about Hemerrhoids, click here.

For information about a High Fiber Diet, click here.

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We know smoking cigarettes can cause lung cancer but until recently we were unaware that it might also play and important role in either causing or potentiating breast cancer. More important is that the women who suffer the most are women who start smoking at a young age. For more information read Smoking and Breast Cancer Risk, Younger Women, click here.

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Once menopause sets in many women will find that they soon either lose or have a decrease in their  sex drive. Loss of libido, vaginal dryness, mood swings, irritability, vaginal irritation can all be symptoms associated with the menopause. This is part one of a three part series, Your Sex Drive & Menopause, click here.

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Hypothyroidism is more common after the onset of menopause, It can play havoc cause weight gain, hair loss, loss of energy, fatigue, and much more. Unfortunately, it is often missed by conventional doctors. To learn how and why hypothyroidism occurs and how it can affect you read Hypothyroidism & Menopause, click here.
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Millions take calcium supplements daily. Whether to prevent osteoporosis or for other reasons’ calcium is one of the most common minerals in the medicine cabinet. Do you really need calcium? If so, in what form and what dosage? In this article we cover the basics and answer your questions. To read Confused About Calcium Supplements, click here.
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We have all heard that people can die of a broken heart. Some people laugh at this idea, but it is real. We now know that a broken heart can cause heart problems and also problems that act very much like to heart problems. To learn more about Broken Heart Syndrome, click here.

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Study Shows Health Benefits of a Diet Rich in Vegetables, Fish, and Olive Oil

Eating a Mediterranean style diet, which is rich in vegetables, olive oil, and fish may keep the mind sharp and slow age-related cognitive decline.

 To read this article Keep Your Aging Mind Sharp, click here.

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“Doctor, I need help. I feel tired all of the time!” One of the most common complaints in medical practice is fatigue.

How often have you wished you could take a nap in the middle of the day? Do you wish you had a bed in your office?  What can you do about feeling fatigued all the time?

To read this article Tired of Fighting Fatigue? Try these, click here.
fall190x135.jpg  New guidelines show a good workout could help elderly patients prevent a fall.

The American Geriatrics Society and the British Geriatric's Society have just released a new set of guidelines to offer help to prevent falls in the elderly.

To read this article Guidelines to Prevent Elderly Falls, click here.

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Guidelines Would Require Schools to Cut Sodium by More Than Half, Use More Whole Grains and Serve Low-Fat Milk

School cafeterias would have to hold the fries - and serve kids more whole grains, fruits and vegetables - under the government's plans for the first major nutritional overhaul of students' meals in 15 years.

To read this article Making School Lunches Healthier , click here.

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Freezing temps? Check. Gray skies? Check. Crabby mood? Check again. But not for long! It may be gloomy outside, but your outlook doesn't have to be...

To read the full article The secrets to a super-happy winter, click here.


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Health Tip: Treating Canker Sores
Suggestions that may ease the pain


Canker sores are small ulcers that form inside and around the mouth, often due to an injury to sensitive tissue.

To read the full article Health Tip: Treating Canker Sores, click here.
shift-work130x100.jpgPeople who work shifts are not able to comply with the natural sleep/wake rhythm based on the cycle of day and night. Their internal body clock becomes unbalanced. The consequences of this can be a variety of metabolic disorders which, on a long-term basis, can be accompanied by a range of illnesses, psychological disorders and even the inability to work.

To read the full article Shift Work And Metabolic Disorders , click here.

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 Meditation Can Make the World Seem a Less Threatening Place
It's going to be a difficult holiday season for a man named Demitrius, who didn't want to use his full name to protect his privacy.

To read the full article Addicts Overcome Holiday Stress with Meditation , click here.


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Do all contraceptives lower ovarian cancer risk?


Birth control pills have long been known to reduce the risk of ovarian cancer, but a new study suggests any type of contraceptive - even, surprisingly, vasectomy - may also be protective.

To read the full article Do all contraceptives lower ovarian cancer risk?, click here.


vaccine130x100.jpg12 Reasons Why Adults Need Vaccines
Vaccines aren't just for kids. Here's why grown-ups need them, too.


Think of vaccines and you might envision teary-eyed kids at the doctor’s office or flu clinic getting a cartoon character bandage on their arm after getting a shot.

To read the full article 12 Reasons Why Adults Need Vaccines , click here.

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Aspirin May Reduce Cancer Risk, But Caution Urged
Some experts say study isn't strong enough for doctors to start recommending a daily dose


A new report from British scientists suggests that long-term, daily aspirin use may modestly lower the risk of dying of certain cancers, though experts warn the study isn't strong enough to recommend healthy people start taking a pill that can cause bleeding and other problems.

To read the full article Aspirin May Reduce Cancer Risk, But Caution Urged, click here.


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Imagination Diet: Thinking About Eating Kills Cravings
Study: Habituate Your Mind to Treats and You Want Them Less


This holiday season, visions of sugar plums dancing in your head, or any other treats for that matter, may be the best way to ensure that you don't overindulge, according to new research from Carnegie Mellon University.

To read the full article Imagination Diet: Thinking About Eating Kills Cravings, click here.


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Older Men Get Less Effective Prostate Cancer Care

Old age is no hindrance to benefitting from prostate cancer surgery and radiation therapy, according to a new U.S. study that shows men over 75 often get less effective treatment than their younger peers.

To read the full article Older Men Get Less Effective Prostate Cancer Care, click here.


pinch130x100.jpgThe Best Ways to Lose Weight and Eat Healthfully in the New Year

It's resolution time again, and often the first resolution on most people’s lists is to lose weight and eat more healthfully. But how exactly do we do that and how do we keep ourselves from becoming a resolution dropout once Feb. 1 rolls around?

To read the full article The Best Ways to Lose Weight and Eat Healthfully in the New Year, click here.
atrophicvaginitis220x160.jpgOne of the more uncomfortable and problematic conditions women might face, atrophic vaginitis. As menopause approaches, estrogen levels fall and the lining of the vagina begins to thin creating an easily solvable problem if dealt with early. For more information on Preventing and Treating Atrophic Vaginitis, click here.

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Multivitamins Cancer, Heart Disease, Death


In recent years article have suggested that multivitamins may play a role in increasing the risk of cancer, heart disease or death in women. Is this true, should you stop taking multivitamins, not yet, for more information on Multivitamins Cancer, Heart Disease, Death, click here.
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America's Healthiest Mall Food

   
After zooming from one end of the mall to the other, don't you deserve a quick bite? Of course. Does it have to be greasy fries, gooey cinnamon buns, or some other equally fattening, sodium-loaded calorie bomb? No way!

To read the full article America's Healthiest Mall Food , click here.
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  Eating Too Much Salt Can Be Dangerous!

You or someone you love may have a problem with salt. If it is you, than pay attention to the recommendations in this article. If it is someone you love, then recognize that you can protect them by going Easy on the Salt!, click here for more information.

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Osteoporosis is a major health problem but many women are unaware of the risks they face and the problems these risks can offer up to them if they do not prepare for and prevent osteoporosis. For more information on what you should but do not know: Women Unaware of Risk for Debilitating Fractures, click here.
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Study Finds Vitamins E and C Don't Reduce Cataract Risk in Men


Long-term use of vitamin E and C supplements doesn't reduce the risk of age-related cataracts in men, a new study finds.

To read the full article Vitamins E and C Don't Reduce Cataract Risk in Men , click here.


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High Cholesterol in Middle Age May Not Raise Dementia Risk for Women

For years, doctors have been saying that keeping your cholesterol levels in check as you age is good for your brain as well as your heart, but a new study suggests the connection between cholesterol and dementia later in life isn't quite so clear-cut.

To read the full article High Cholesterol in Middle Age May Not Raise Dementia Risk for Women, click here.

child-abuse130x100.jpgChildhood Abuse Increases Risk Of Adult Diabetes

Were you the victim of physical or sexual abuse as a child? If so, you may have a 26 to 69% greater risk of type 2 adult diabetes, according to an article today on HealthFinder.gov.

To read the full article Childhood Abuse Increases Risk Of Adult Diabetes, click here.


seasonalaffective130x100.jpg12 Signs of Seasonal Affective Disorder

The time of year is approaching that people may begin to experience the symptoms of seasonal depression, commonly known as season affective disorder with the appropriate acronym of SAD.

To read the full article 12 Signs of Seasonal Affective Disorder, click here.


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Wandering Mind May Lead to Unhappiness

Researchers Say People Are Most Happy Having Sex, Exercising, Socializing, Mainly Because Such Activities Help Keep the Mind From Wandering

To read the full article Wandering Mind May Lead to Unhappiness, click here.


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One year ago a government panel changed the recommendations for breast cancer screening, from yearly to ever two years. Most professional organizations have disagreed with this and most have not followed suit. The question now being asked is where does this leave women? Should they change what they do, or should they stay with the older, more well entrenched, recommendations and continue to have yearly mammography?
ladyskin-1.jpgIt is now Autumn and the weather is turning colder and dryer, if you have dry and unsightly skin you will want to read this article. Along with fall and winter often comes dry, irritated and unsightly, skin. Now even though the worst of the winter you won’t have to suffer unsightly and uncomfortable skin. In the following article we will tell you how to banish dry skin and give your autum-winter skin care regimen a boost.
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There are times when not feeling good is clearly caused by something we ate, the weather, or too much physical activity. But what happens when symptoms are caused by more significant health problem? When should symptoms not be ignored because they herald major health issues. Here are ten symptoms women should never ignore and why they should not be ignored.
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Prevention Is Really An Act of Love


So you feel healthy and you want to stay healthy. What is it that you need to do to maintain excellent health and well-being? Certainly diet, exercise and lifestyle are important but equally as important is early diagnosis of possible life or at least, well-being threatening conditions.
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The doctorsand media has been misleading women about Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) for years, and they are going to do it again.

Brace yourselves, another round of misleading information about Estrogen and Progesterone Hormone Therapy is about to hit the media. Before you get upset, before you get too confused, don’t stop using HRT read this article, first before doing anything.

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Experts: Alcohol More Harmful Than Crack or Heroin
Substance Abuse Ranked According to Harm to User and Society


Alcohol abuse is more harmful than crack or heroin abuse, according to a new study by a former British government drug advisor and other experts.

To read the full article Experts: Alcohol More Harmful Than Crack or Heroin, click here.

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Dr. Marie Savard Responds to Viewers' Questions After Oct. 19 Study Results


An ongoing Women's Health Initiative study released results last week showing postmenopausal women who took a combination of estrogen and progestin therapy had a higher chance of getting aggressive forms of breast cancer and may even be at a higher risk of death because of the disease.


To read the full article
Getting Answers After HRT Linked to High Cancer Risk , click here.

Another opinion on this topic Misleading Information, click here.

litecigarette130x100.jpg“Light” Tobacco Products No Less Harmful

You may be wondering where your “light,” “low,” and “mild” cigarettes are, as they rapidly disappear from retailer’s shelves.

To read the full article “Light” Tobacco Products No Less Harmful, click here.

lovedrug130x100.jpgThe Love Drug
Study Indicates Intense, Passionate Love May Act as Potent Painkiller


Sometimes, love hurts. But sometimes, a new Stanford University study suggests, intense, passionate love might actually be able to provide you with pain relief - perhaps even as much as morphine does!

To read the full article The Love Drug, click here.


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Buprenorphine Expands Access to Addiction Treatment
Drug May Help Many Painkiller Addicts Break Their Addiction


In 2010, addicts' drugs-of-choice are often found in a bottle with a child-safety lid and a local drug store label.

To read the full article Buprenorphine Expands Access to Addiction Treatment, click here.

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Medical Milestone: Genetics Company Begins First Embryonic Stem-Cell Treatment on Patient
First Study to Focus on How Patient With Spinal Cord Injuries Will React to Treatment


For years, scientists have held out the promise that embryonic stem cells could repair damaged spinal cords and cure other serious ailments.

To read the full article Genetics Company Begins First Embryonic Stem-Cell Treatment on Patient, click here.

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Taking Early Retirement May Retire Memory, Too

The two economists call their paper “Mental Retirement,” and their argument has intrigued behavioral researchers.

To read the full article Taking Early Retirement May Retire Memory, Too , click here.

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National Breast Cancer Awareness Month

When you think of October images of pumpkins, spider webs, ghosts, ghouls, and goblins often spring to mind.

To read the full article National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, click here.

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Almost Half of Women Have Sexual Problems
But study found only 12% are upset about it.


In a double whammy for the female gender, new research shows that 40 percent of women report sexual problems, but only 12 percent are distressed about it.

To read the full article Almost Half of Women Have Sexual Problems, click here.


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Female Sexual Dysfunction -- Medical Fiction?
Experts Debate Existence, Prevalence and Treatment of FSD

Many doctors have critiqued the over-medicalization of female sexual dysfunction by the pharmaceutical industry, but journalist Ray Moynihan, author of "Sex, Drugs, and Pharmaceuticals", goes so far as to argue that drug-makers helped to create the disorder.

To read the full article Female Sexual Dysfunction -- Medical Fiction?, click here.

job130x100.jpg7 Ways to Work Yourself to Death
Research Reveals Several Surprising Ways Your Job Could Shorten Your Life


It turns out your job might be a double-edged sword when it comes to your health.

To read the full article 7 Ways to Work Yourself to Death, click here.

camemoryproblems130x100.jpgCancer Survivors May Be at Risk for Memory Problems
40% of patients with history of disease reported forgetfulness, confusion


Memory problems are common among people who have a history of cancer, new research reveals.

To read the full article Cancer Survivors May Be at Risk for Memory Problems , click here.

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Women With Sexual Dysfunction Respond Well To Placebo Therapy

Women with sexual dysfunction - low sexual arousal and/or sexual desire - appear to experience clinically significant symptom changes when given a placebo, according to a study published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

To read the full article Women With Sexual Dysfunction Respond Well To Placebo Therapy, click here.


Cellphone130x100.jpgCell Phone Pictures May be the Next Medical Diagnostic Tool
Study Looking at Impact of Cell Phone Pictures on Diagnosis of Wounds


Dr. Neal Sikka, an emergency room physician at George Washington University Medical Center, recalls an eye-opening incident that happened while he was away at a medical conference.

To read the full article Cell Phone Pictures May be the Next Medical Diagnostic Tool, click here.

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Not Just Robotripping: 5 Risky Things Kids Do
Telltale Signs of Deadly Behaviors May Help Parents Keep Their Kids Safe


Parents' worries never stop. But sometimes, Mom and Dad need reminders that seemingly innocuous items -- cough syrup  bottles, cans of computer keyboard cleaners, even incense made from herbs and spices, can provide clues that their children are toying with danger.

To read the full article Not Just Robotripping: 5 Risky Things Kids Do, click here.


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Health reform begins: What changes mean to you
Many features, such as no more lifetime insurance caps, kick in by Sept. 23


By Sept. 23, the six month anniversary of the enactment of the health overhaul, many of the law’s provisions will be in effect.

To read the full article Health reform begins: What changes mean to you, click here.


parenting130x100.jpgHow to Make Parenting with Your Ex Work
Child and Adolescent Psychologist Dr. Jennifer Hartstein Shares Three Cardinal Rules for Getting Over Yourself For Your Kids


With almost half of all first marriages ending in divorce, millions of children are impacted each year by their parents' separation.

To read the full article How to Make Parenting with Your Ex Work, click here.

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Omega-Enhanced Margarines a Heart-Saver?
EPA-DHA Pumped Spreads Reconsidered


They taste like butter and offer a boost of heart healthy omega-3 fatty acids, but these omega-enhanced margarines may not actually help your heart, according to new research from the Netherlands.

To read the full article Omega-Enhanced Margarines a Heart-Saver? , click here.


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Marijuana Eases Chronic Pain, Researchers Say
New Study Confirms the Pain-Relieving Effects of Smoking Marijuana


Smoking marijuana modestly reduced pain and other symptoms of chronic neuropathic pain, results of a small trial showed.

To read the full article Marijuana Eases Chronic Pain, Researchers Say, click here.

devilchild130x100.jpgHow to Create a Spoiled Brat: 9 Parenting No-Nos

Kids need to know their parents love them. But some moms and dads think that the way to show love is to accept children's bad behavior.

To read the full article How to Create a Spoiled Brat: 9 Parenting No-Nos, click here.

dry-skin130x100.jpgMenopause and Dry Skin: The Hormone Connection
Dealing with dry, itchy skin at menopause? Find out why -- and get simple tips for smoother skin.


Menopause and Dry Skin: The Hormone Connection
Dealing with dry, itchy skin at menopause? Find out why -- and get simple tips for smoother skin.

To read the full article Menopause and Dry Skin: The Hormone Connection, click here.

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Women's behavior linked to ... ovulation?
Study: Hormone shift affects how females talk, walk and even dress to attract men


When a woman is ovulating, her behavior changes in a startling number of ways from the way she walks, talks and dresses to the men she flirts with, according to new research.

To read the full article Women's behavior linked to ... ovulation?, click here.

weightloss130x100.jpg10 Reasons Women Can't Lose Weight

A slide show listing 10 reasons women have problems losing weight.

To read the full article 10 Reasons Women Can't Lose Weight, click here.


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An Antagonistic Personality Might Increase Your Risk For Cardiovascular Disease


People with antagonistic or disagreeable personalities have thicker arterial walls that may make them more prone to heart attacks and strokes, researchers said.

To read the full article An Antagonistic Personality Might Increase Your Risk For Cardiovascular Disease, click here.


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Regular Beer Raises Psoriasis Risk in Women
Researchers say women who drink regular beer are more likely to have the skin condition.


Women who drink five or more regular beers a week are at a higher risk for developing psoriasis, researchers said.

To read the full article Regular Beer Raises Psoriasis Risk in Women, click here.


ADHD130x100.jpgADHD Misdiagnoses Identified by New Study
There Are No Blood Tests or Other Neurological Markers for ADHD


Many children who are disruptive in school classrooms are misdiagnosed with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, when all they really are ... are young, according to a new study.

To read the full article ADHD Misdiagnoses Identified by New Study, click here.

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Stressful Social Situations May Be Physically Harmful in Some
If immune system reacts with inflammation, repeated stress can lead to chronic disease, study finds.


Stress caused by social situations, such as giving a speech or going to a job interview, can affect some people's immune system in ways that harm their health, researchers have found.

To read the full article Stressful Social Situations May Be Physically Harmful in Some, click here.
 

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Picky Eaters: When Waffles and Fries Are All You Eat
New Study To Determine Why Picky Eaters Won't Eat More Food


Bob Krause hates Thanksgiving, and not because of that all forced family time. Krause, 63, calls himself a picky eater -- one who won't eat anything that's served at a traditional Thanksgiving dinner, or any other dinner, for that matter.

To read the full article Picky Eaters: When Waffles and Fries Are All You Eat, click here.

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Osteoporosis Meds Have No Link to Cancer

Taking to many meds? Are you concerned they may lead to other forms of illness?

To read the full article Osteoporosis Meds Have No Link to Cancer, click here.

TunaFish130x100.jpgTen Essential Mercury Facts

Confused by mercury hype? Fear not. Mercury science continues to confirm that fish is a health food. But a host of moneyed activist groups defy reason by dishonestly complaining that "mercury in fish" is today's version of "lead in paint."

To read the full article Ten Essential Mercury Facts, click here.

brain130x100.jpgMenstrual Cramps Also a Pain in the Brain

While not every woman experiences cramping during her menstrual cycle, those that do know it is a very real pain,

To read the full article Menstrual Cramps Also a Pain in the Brain, click here.

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Stress May Affect Chances of Getting Pregnant
Study Shows Women With High Levels of Stress-Related Hormone Less Likely to Conceive


There is now scientific evidence to back up the widely held belief that stress can interfere with fertility.

To read the full article Stress May Affect Chances of Getting Pregnant, click here.

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Getting defensive is good for men — but not women
Study shows such behavior makes men feel less stressed; women have opposite reaction

You might think that defensiveness — which psychologists describe as avoiding, denying, or repressing information one perceives as threatening — would not be a good thing, and maybe even causes you stress.

To read the full article Getting defensive is good for men — but not women , click here.

low-carb-diet130x100.jpgOver Time, Low-Carb Diet Trumps Low-Fat Diet on "Good" Cholesterol and Works Just as Well to Lose Weight

Over the long term, a low-carb diet works just as well as a low-fat diet at taking off the pounds - and it might be better for your heart, new research suggests.

To read the full article Low-Carb Diet Beats Low-Fat , click here.
healthyfood130x100.jpgBoosting 5 Vital Nutrients Kids Need
Easy tips to help your kids get more of 5 essential nutrients often missing from their diets.

Certain essential nutrients have gone missing from our kids' diets.

To read the full article Boosting 5 Vital Nutrients Kids Need, click here.


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In the era of Google, medical advice is more confusing than ever. Here's a guide to what you really need to know, and when.

It's a cliché that we're living in the too much Information Age, and if you Google anything related to health, it's plain to see why.

To read the full article Healthy at Any Age, click here.


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How to spot a spoiled child, and what to do about it.


Every parent has probably heard it at one time or another: "You're going to spoil that child!"

To read the full article Is Your Child Spoiled? , click here.


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Superstitions Boost Confidence, Performance, Study Shows the Power of Good Luck Charms


Don’t throw out that lucky rabbit’s foot or trash your lucky socks. A study shows that believing in a superstition can actually improve your performance on a task by boosting your self-confidence.

To read the full article Superstitions Boost Confidence, Performance, click here.
mothermenopause130x100.jpgWill you have your mother's menopause?

Sandra Gordon is dreading menopause. The 46-year-old from Weston, Connecticut, watched her mother's memory falter in her mid-50s, due to changing hormone levels.

To read the full article Will you have your mother's menopause?, click here.

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High Heel Addiction: Go High or Go Home

Whether they're Jimmy Choos, Manolo Blahniks, or Christian Louboutins, women love high heels.

To read the full article High Heel Addiction: Go High or Go Home, click here.


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Sperm Gene Is 600 Million Years Old

Just as fashion changes from year to year and culture to culture, so do "sexy" genes, or genes specific to sex – with one critical exception.

To read the full article Sperm Gene Is 600 Million Years Old, click here.


marriage130x100.jpgVideo of Chris Wragge as he moderates an Early Show Marriage Summit where couples get tips on how to have a successful relationship.

To read the full article Secrets to a Happy Marriage, click here.


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Blood Pressure Adversely Affected by Diets High in Sugar

Salt has long been the enemy for people suffering from hypertension (high blood pressure), but now another white granular substance will be joining its ranks on the restriction list: sugar.

To read the full article Blood Pressure Adversely Affected by Diets High in Sugar , click here.

 

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Olive Oil: Helping in the Fight Against Breast Cancer

Something as simple as olive oil could actually make a difference when predisposed to or fighting against breast cancer.

To read the full article Olive Oil: Helping in the Fight Against Breast Cancer, click here.

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The Surprising Toll of Sleep Deprivation
How skimping on rest affects your brain, your hormones, and your heart.


How much sleep is enough? Is how sleepy you feel a good judge of whether or not you are getting enough sleep?

To read the full article The Surprising Toll of Sleep Deprivation, click here.

sunburn130x100.jpgGot Too Much Sun? How to Save Your Skin
Beauty Expert Offers Short-Term Solutions for Feeling Better After a Sunburn, and Longer-Term Answers to Fix Damaged Skin


The long holiday weekend isn't even over yet, but many people have already gotten way too much sun, and the inevitable resulting sunburn - even if they wore sunscreen.

To read the full article Got Too Much Sun? How to Save Your Skin , click here.


sunburn130x100.jpgSummer Safety, Come Rain or Shine
Tips to Stay Safe From Heat Stroke and Lightning Strikes


With the arrival of summer home cookouts, days at the pool, camping trips and other outdoor activities, the allure of summertime pleasures often comes attached to seasonal hazards in the form of heat-related illness and lightning strikes.

To read the full article Summer Safety, Come Rain or Shine, click here.

womensex130x100.jpg‘Female Viagra' rejected by FDA panel
Benefits of pill to boost women's libido didn't outweigh side effects


A "pink pill" to boost women's sex drive remains elusive after a decade of searching by some of the world's biggest drugmakers.

To read the full article ‘Female Viagra' rejected by FDA panel, click here.


teendrinking130x100.jpgParenting Style Linked to Heavy Drinking in Kids
Binge Drinking Less Likely in Teens With Strict, Supportive Parents, Study Says


Teens with lax parents are more likely to drink heavily than teens with strict but supportive parents, a new study finds.

To read the full article  Parenting Style Linked to Heavy Drinking in Kids, click here.


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The Surprising Toll of Sleep Deprivation
How skimping on rest affects your brain, your hormones, and your heart.


How much sleep is enough? Is how sleepy you feel a good judge of whether or not you are getting enough sleep?

To read the full article The Surprising Toll of Sleep Deprivation , click here.

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This Is Your Brain. Aging.
Science is reshaping what we know about getting older. (The news is better than you think.)


Over the years, Timothy Salthouse has tested more than 8,000 people in his lab at the University of Virginia, assessing their memories, problem-solving skills, and other mental functions to see how the brain fares with age.

To read the full article This Is Your Brain. Aging , click here.


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Low energy, backaches could indicate health problems

Low energy, backaches, AWOL periods. Sound familiar? You may need to see your doc, stat! “Harmless” symptoms like these can forecast scary health problems.

To read the full article 10 symptoms not to ignore, click here.


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Cheap Injection Could Stop Thousands Of People Dying Of Severe Bleeding From Accidents, Injuries


Results from an international trial involving over 20,000 participants in 40 countries suggest that if recently injured patients with serious bleeding were to be given an injection of a cheap, widely available drug

To read the full article Cheap Injection Could Stop Thousands Of People Dying Of Severe Bleeding From Accidents injuries, click here.
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Healthy Cholesterol May Lower Cancer Risk
HDL 'Good' Cholesterol Associated With Reduced Risk for Cancer


Maintaining a healthy cholesterol level may help protect you against cancer, according to a new study.

To read the full article Healthy Cholesterol May Lower Cancer Risk, click here.
genes130x100.jpgAmericans want to know the details of their genetic codes

With all the nonstop news we hear about genetic medicine—a gene discovered here! a new genetic test developed there!—it's easy to forget that our intro to this mesmerizing field of medicine happened only very recently.

To read the full article Americans want to know the details of their genetic codes, click here.


healthyfood130x100.jpgNew USDA Nutrition Guidelines Focus on Unhealthy Population
Guidelines Take Aim at Salt, Fat; Target Obese Population


The latest set of national dietary guidelines acknowledges that many Americans are unhealthy and emphasizes efforts to battle the obesity epidemic.

To read the full article New USDA Nutrition Guidelines Focus on Unhealthy Population, click here.

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Does Eating Brown Rice Lower Diabetes Risk?
Eaters of Brown Rice Have Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes, Study Finds

White or brown rice might be a matter of taste. But people who substitute brown rice for white rice for health reasons may be onto something, a new study from Harvard University implies.

To read the full article Does Eating Brown Rice Lower Diabetes Risk?, click here.

wrongdrug130x100.jpgLook-alike, sound-alike drugs trigger dangers
5 million errors a year tied to wrong medications; some cause injury, death


Whether the drug mistake was caused by a garbled telephone message, a typing error or a computer problem, Shelley Sanders isn’t sure.

To read the full article Look-alike, sound-alike drugs trigger dangers , click here.

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Look Better Naked -- By Tonight!
Women's Health Magazine Editor in Chief Shares Quick Tips to Help You Look Svelte in Hours


Do you feel great naked? If you don't, you're not alone.

To read the full article Look Better Naked -- By Tonight!, click here.

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Survey May Explain Steady Teen Pregnancy Rate
CDC Finds 6% Percent Jump in Use of "Rhythm Method" Since 2002; More Teens Also Say Unmarried Motherhood OK


A growing number of teen girls say they use the rhythm method for birth control, and more teens also think it's OK for an unmarried female to have a baby, according to a government survey released Wednesday.

To read the full article Survey May Explain Steady Teen Pregnancy Rate, click here.

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 American-Made Cigarettes May Be More Cancerous, CDC Finds
Popular U.S. Brands Have More Carcinogens Than Foreign Smokes


Smokers beware : "Made in the U.S.A" may mean a higher dose of a major carcinogen, according to new research from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

To read the full article American-Made Cigarettes May Be More Cancerous, CDC Finds , click here.

prematureejaculation130x100.jpgNew Topical Spray Promising as Premature Ejaculation Treatment
Men in Study Who Used Spray Lasted Longer Than Men Who Didn't


Premature ejaculation is the number one sexual problem that men deal with.

To read the full article New Topical Spray Promising as Premature Ejaculation tment, click here.
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The Pill Turns 50
But did it really change the world? Five myths about oral contraceptives.


Fifty years ago this spring, the federal Food and Drug Administration approved a medication that would have a profound impact on women's lives.

To read the full article The Pill Turns 50, click here.


healthreform130x83.JPGMost states sign up to offer new health coverage
At least 27 states and D.C. will run high-risk insurance pools for very ill


A majority of states have told the Obama administration they want to take part in providing new coverage to uninsured people with medical problems — an early benefit of the health care overhaul law.

To read the full article Most states sign up to offer new health coverage, click here.
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Canadians boast longer lives, better health, eh?
Universal care may be the difference between U.S., northern neighbor


Canadians live about three years longer and are healthier than Americans, and the lack of universal health care in the United States may be a factor, researchers say.

To read the full article Canadians boast longer lives, better health, eh?, click here.


postbirth-130x100.jpgWhere's the Best Place to be a Mom?
An International Survey Ranked the U.S. 28th in the World For Mothers


People often like to think their moms are the best, but is their country the best place to be for moms?

To read the full article Where's the Best Place to be a Mom?, click here.

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Health Questions Women Need to Ask Their Moms
Dr. Jennifer Ashton Discusses How to Talk About Health Histories


Most women know their mom's medical history can provide important clues to her own. But what exactly do you need to know?

To read the full article Health Questions Women Need to Ask Their Moms, click here.


saltsugar130x100.jpgSugar and Salt Are Becoming Your Enemies

We do love our chips, our cookies, and every restaurant table is set with a salt shaker and several forms of sugar, but the truth is that the use of both sugar and salt is constantly being discouraged by new research.

To read the full article Sugar and Salt Are Becoming Your Enemies, click here.


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Is Organic Food Marketing Hype?
Six experts, including a farmer and a food critic, square off.


Organic produce, and meat and dairy products, are a tiny—although growing—fraction of what Americans spend on food, on the order of 3 percent.

To read the full article Is Organic Food Marketing Hype?, click here.
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Fat Kids, Cruel World
Why the first lady's fight to end childhood obesity does damage to the children it's trying to help.


I didn't write, "I am 9 (almost ten) and I love unicorns," although that was true. Nor did I write, "I am 9 (almost ten) and I live in Florida with my dad and my dog Priscilla, who is all black with a big poofy tail," although that was likewise accurate.

To read the full article Fat Kids, Cruel World, click here.

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Predicting Kids' Success ... with Marshmallows
Studies Show Kids Who Can Force Themselves to Wait for Greater Rewards Tend to go on to Better Academic and Personal Lives


Testing footage shows children desperately trying to resist temptation. Their dilemma? Ring the bell, and get one marshmallow now. Or, wait, and get two marshmallows later.

To read the full article Fat Kids, Cruel World, click here.

lowsexdrive130x100.jpgMore Young Women, 18-30, Report Low Libido
Sexperts Say Women are Stressed; Birth Control and Antidepressants Are Also to Blame

Iris, a young woman from North Carolina, can't understand why she has no sexual desire -- she is only 30 and in love.

To read the full article More Young Women, 18-30, Report Low Libido, click here.


sexually-transmitted-diseases130x100.jpgSexually Transmitted Disease: The Next Superbug?

A sexually transmitted infection may be on its way to becoming untreatable after showing growing resistance to multiple antibiotic drugs.

To read the full article Sexually Transmitted Disease: The Next Superbug?, click here.

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When Divorce Isn’t the Only Choice
A Montana writer's husband said he was leaving, but she saw another way out.


Her husband's words hit Laura Munson "like a sucker punch." And yet, she says, she was able to duck. After two decades together, he came to her on a summer day and told her: "I don't love you anymore.

To read the full article When Divorce Isn’t the Only Choice , click here.

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1 in 4 will need health decisions made for them
Those who have living wills usually get treatment they wanted, study finds


A significant number of the elderly — more than one in four — will eventually need someone to make end-of-life decisions about their medical care, a new study suggests.

To read the full article 1 in 4 will need health decisions made for them, click here.

suicide130x100.jpgHow To Prevent Young Suicides

This academic year, a cluster of six suicides at Cornell University shocked the nation. Suicide is the third leading cause of death among people ages 10 to 24. Dr. Jon LaPook reports.

To read the full article How To Prevent Young Suicides, click here.

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Magnet Mayhem: Modifying Morality with Magnets?
Electromagnet Gives Moral Compass a Jolt, Study Finds


An electromagnetic jolt to your brain can temporarily impair your sense of morality.
The FDA has approved a brain stimulator for those suffering from depression.

To read the full article Magnet Mayhem: Modifying Morality with Magnets?, click here.


Vitamin-D130x100.jpgLow Vitamin D Levels Tied to Incontinence
Vitamin D Deficiency May Contribute to Pelvic Floor Disorders in Women


Not getting enough vitamin D may cause women problems in the bathroom as well as with their bones.

To read the full article  Low Vitamin D Levels Tied to Incontinence, click here.


sabatoge130x100.jpgSabotaging Success, but to What End?

“You could say I’ve been unlucky in love,” a young man told me during a recent consultation.

To read the full article Sabotaging Success, but to What End?, click here.


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Study: Infertility Increases a Man's Risk for Prostate Cancer

Infertile men have a higher risk of developing high grade prostate cancer, which is more likely to grow and spread quickly, according to a new study.   

To read the full article Study: Infertility Increases a Man's Risk for Prostate Cancer, click here.


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Gene Regulation Determines Individuality, Study

A team of US and German scientists has found that we differ from each more because of the way our genes are regulated, such as which are switched on and which are switched off, than because of the differences among the genes themselves

To read the full article Gene Regulation Determines Individuality, Study, click here.


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Mediterranean Diet May Increase Success of Infertility Treatments

The Mediterranean Diet seems to be the wunderkind in the weight loss world, ranked as one of the Top 10 most popular diets,, it has been studied extensively over the past several years and found to produce numerous health benefits.

To read the full article Mediterranean Diet May Increase Success of Infertility Treatments , click here.
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Risk of Death Persists After a Hip Fracture

Older men and women who break a hip are five to eight times more likely to die in the first three months after the fracture, a new study by Belgian researchers has found.

To read the full article Risk of Death Persists After a Hip Fracture, click here.

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Suffocation Danger To Young Babies In Sling Carriers: US Consumers Warned

US consumers are being warned about the dangers of carrying babies up to four months old in a sling carrier as there is a possible risk of them suffocating if carried incorrectly.

To read the full article Suffocation Danger To Young Babies In Sling Carriers: US Consumers Warned, click here.

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High Fiber Diet May Influence COPD Risk

Dietary fiber, also known as roughage, is probably best known for its ability to prevent or relieve constipation, but fiber can provide many other health benefits as well.

To read the full article High Fiber Diet May Influence COPD Risk, click here.

diabetes130x100.jpgBlood Pressure Drugs No Help for Diabetes
Studies: Statins, Fibrates to Lower Fats, Cholesterol and Blood Pressure Do Not Reduce Heart Attack Risk in Diabetics


Key results from a landmark federal study are in, and the results are disappointing for diabetics: Adding drugs to drive blood pressure and blood-fats lower than current targets did not prevent heart problems, and in some cases caused harmful side effects.

To read the full article Blood Pressure Drugs No Help for Diabetes, click here.


ed130x100.jpgErectile Dysfunction May Indicate Doubled Death Risk
Heart Patients With Ailment Had Twice the Heart Attacks, Deaths


A new study suggests that men with heart problems may have double the risk of death if they also suffer from erectile dysfunction.

To read the full article Erectile Dysfunction May Indicate Doubled Death Risk, click here.


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Heart disease tied to mom’s number of births
Giving birth to five or more children greatly increased risk, study finds

A woman's risk of heart disease and stroke in middle-age and beyond may be associated with the number of children she gives birth to, a large study of Swedish women hints.

To read the full article Heart disease tied to mom’s number of births, click here.
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Meat Might Be Behind Many Unidentified Allergic Reactions
Certain carb could be causing severe anaphylaxis, researchers warn.


A carbohydrate in meat called alpha-gal may be the unrecognized cause of recurring severe allergic reactions in some patients, a new study suggests.

To read the full article Meat Might Be Behind Many Unidentified Allergic Reactions, click here.
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Lactose Intolerance: Actual Prevalence and Levels of Severity Unknown

In ancient Greece, the physician Hippocrates first noted gastrointestinal upset in some people who consumed milk.

To read the full article Lactose Intolerance: Actual Prevalence and Levels of Severity Unknown, click here.

hightfatdiet130x130.jpgHigh-Fat Diet More Than Waistline Worry for Women Over 50

We know diets high in fat, like those that are prevalent in Western countries, are harmful and can lead to a variety of health problems such as diabetes, heart failure, and obesity.

To read the full article High-Fat Diet More Than Waistline Worry for Women Over 50, click here.


stroke130x100.jpgIn Preventing Stroke, Surgery Beats Stents
Surgery Appears Safer than Stenting for Preventing Stroke Caused by Narrow Neck Arteries


When the arteries that supply blood to the brain become narrowed by the build-up of the waxy substance called plaque, skyrocketing the risk for stroke, surgery is the best and safest way to treat the problem, according to European stroke researchers.

To read the full article In Preventing Stroke, Surgery Beats Stents, click here.

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Pain in the ear has many possible causes and may be accompanied by other symptoms.
Here are possible causes


Pain in the ear has many possible causes and may be accompanied by other symptoms.

To read the full article Pain in the ear, click here.

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High blood pressure a neglected disease in U.S.
Report: 1 in 3 adults affected but doctors failing to treat it aggressively


A critical new report declares high blood pressure in the U.S. to be a neglected disease — a term that usually describes mysterious tropical illnesses, not a well-known plague of rich countries.

To read the full article High blood pressure a neglected disease in U.S., click here.


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Health Tip: Avoid Triggers for Eczema
What may make the skin condition flare


The skin condition eczema, characterized by an itchy red rash, may be caused by a host of allergens or irritants.

To read the full article Health Tip: Avoid Triggers for Eczema, click here.


vitmainD-Cancer130x100.jpgIn Tests, Vitamin D Shrinks Breast Cancer Cells
Results Encouraging, But Don't Read Too Much Into Them, Says Dr. Richard Besser


Doctors have known that low levels of vitamin D are linked to certain kinds of cancers as well as to diabetes and asthma, but new research also shows that the vitamin can kill human cancer cells.

To read the full article In Tests, Vitamin D Shrinks Breast Cancer Cells, click here.


choaking130x100.jpgShould Hot Dogs Carry Warning Label for Kids?
Hot Dogs Are a Choking Hazard for Small Children, Experts Warn in New Pediatrics Report


In mere seconds, a seemingly innocuous piece of food can turn deadly. And Katherine Zuehlke, of Westerville, Ohio, knows firsthand there's nothing more frightening than realizing your child is choking.

To read the full article Should Hot Dogs Carry Warning Label for Kids? , click here.

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Men more evolved? Their Y chromosome is
Genes that make a man are evolving far faster than rest of human code


Women may think of men as primitive, but new research indicates that the Y chromosome — the thing that makes a man male — is evolving far faster than the rest of the human genetic code.

To read the full article Men more evolved? Their Y chromosome is , click here.


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Hypertension fuels a scarring that can cause Alzheimer's, research shows


If the cardiologist's warnings do not scare you, consider this: Controlling blood pressure just might be the best protection yet known against dementia.

To read the full article High blood pressure linked to dementia , click here.

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A simple change each day can drastically cut your heart disease risk

Did you know that more than 41 million women in America have heart disease? And that more women than men will die from it?

To read the full article 28 days to a healthier heart , click here.

Active ImageBody dysmorphic disorder patients see details, not whole face

Some people check their appearance in any mirror, window or computer screen they can find, but not out of vanity. It's because they hate the way they look so much.

To read the full article Body dysmorphic disorder patients see details not the whole face, click here.


Active ImageThe Miracle of Vitamin D: Sound Science, or Hype?

Imagine a treatment that could build bones, strengthen the immune system and lower the risks of illnesses like diabetes, heart and kidney disease, high blood pressure and cancer.

To read the full article The Miracle of Vitamin D: Sound Science, or Hype? , click here.

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Migraines Linked to Depression?

The study in the Netherlands involved 2,652 people who took part in the larger Erasmus Rucphen Family study. All of the participants were descendants of 22 couples who lived in Rucphen in the 1850s to 1900s.

To read the full article Migraines Linked to Depression?, click here.

blaming-others130x100.jpgPassing the Buck: Blaming Others Is Contagious
Finger pointing at others, especially at work, can cause cascade, study says


Blaming mistakes on others is socially contagious, according to a new study. Just watching someone pawn their failures off on another can make you do the same to protect your self-image.

To read the full article Passing the Buck: Blaming Others Is Contagious, click here.


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19 Bizarre Home Cures That Really Work

Of course there are some health staples you should never be without — bandages or OTC pain relievers come to mind. But you can treat or cure a surprising number of minor ailments with these unexpected household objects and foods.

To read the full article 19 Bizarre Home Cures That Really Work, click here.

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600,000 Cribs Recalled After Baby's Death
Drop sides on 20 models of Dorel Asia cribs can detach, creating deadly gap


The death of a 6-month-old child prompted the recall Tuesday of about 635,000 cribs sold by Kmart, Sears, Wal-Mart and other stores.

To read the full article 600,000 Cribs Recalled After Baby's Death, click here.


highheals130x100.jpgShould Little Girls Wear High Heels?
Parents Magazine Editor in Chief Discusses Health Concerns, Gives Advice on How to Discourage High Heel Envy


There is a growing trend of little girls wearing high heels. However, there are many health-related concerns that have parents trying to steer their kids away from these fashions.

To read the full article Should Little Girls Wear High Heels?, click here.

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Pomegranates Prevent Breast Cancer?

Researchers have linked fruits that contain anti-aromatase phytochemicals, such as pomegranates, to a reduced risk of hormone-dependent breast cancer.

To read the full story Pomegranates Prevent Breast Cancer?, click here.

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10 ways to boost your brain power

Around the time we hit 30, our brains begin a slow, steady downward trajectory, or so popular wisdom would have it. But cognitive decline is by no means an inescapable side effect of aging.

To read the full story 10 ways to boost your brain power , click here.

Active ImageEmpowering Teen Girls on Sex
Dr. Jennifer Ashton Sits Down with Them to Find Out What They Know About Sex, Puberty and Contraception


To celebrate the release of her book, "The Body Scoop for Girls: A Straight-Talk Guide to a Healthy, Beautiful You," CBS News medical correspondent Dr. Jennifer Ashton sat down with some typical teenagers from the New York area to give them the scoop on their health on everything from body image to contraception.

To read the full story Empowering Teen Girls on Sex, click here.

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 Study: Antidepressants, Placebos Near Equally Effective
Commonly Prescribed Antidepressants Had 'Negligible' Effect on Patients With Mild, Moderate, Even Severe Depression


A new analysis found that commonly prescribed antidepressants had little effect on people with cases of mild to severe depression compared to those treated with placebos.

To read the full story  Antidepressants, Placebos Near Equally Effective , click here.

Active ImageG-Spot Study: Erogenous of Erroneous Zone?
Sex Educators Say Study Dismissing G-Spot Is Flawed, Didn't Account for Positions, Partners


California saleswoman Tamara Bell has been married 26 years and she credits the longevity of her relationship, in part, to the contentious G-spot.

To read the full story G-Spot Study , click here.

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Two Cancer Codes Cracked

'We will think about cancers in a very different way's. Researchers have mapped the DNA mutations in skin and lung cancer — findings that one researcher says will change how cancer is viewed.


To read the full article Two Cancer Codes Cracked, click here.

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Why Women Wrinkle Around Mouth
Women More Likely Than Men to Get Wrinkles Around the Lips; Is Biology to Blame?


Biology may be the reason why women are more prone than men to developing wrinkles around the lips -- called perioral wrinkles-- and deeper ones, too, a new study says.

To read the full article Why Women Wrinkle Around Mouth, click here.

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A Device to De-Stress Your Workout

AFTER a night that included several beers and not enough sleep, Keith Gillis, a 31-year-old cyclist in Truro, Nova Scotia, set out on a 74-mile road ride with the caveat that he was feeling fatigued.

To read the full article A Device to De-Stress Your Workouts, click here.

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Study: Women Get More Wrinkles Than Men
Aesthetic Surgery Journal Finds Anatomical Differences in Male and Female Faces Make Women More Prone to Wrinkling


Mirror, mirror on the wall -- who has the most wrinkles of them all? According to a new study, men win the wrinkle war. Women wrinkle more easily.

To read the full article Women Get More Wrinkles Than Men , click here.


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From Genome to Hormones, Doctors Pick the Top Medical Advances of The Decade


The first decade of the 21st century brought a number of discoveries, mistakes and medical advances that influenced medicine from the patient's bedside to the medicine cabinet.

To read the full article The Top 10 Medical Advances of the Decade, click here.

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Antidepressants Change Personality

People who take anti-depressants may experience personality changes separate from the alleviation of their depressive symptoms.

To read the full article Antidepressants Change Personality , click here.

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Red wine or white? Which makes teeth a fright?
Health conscious (and vain) vino drinkers face cocktail conundrum


Monika Jones, 28, loves red wine. What she doesn’t love is the “monster mouth” it gives her. “I’ve found that red wine not only stains my teeth — it turns the inner part of my lips a dark magenta after just two glasses,” says Jones, a Seattle writer. “My friends call it ‘monster mouth.’”

To read the full article Red wine or white? Which makes teeth a fright?, click here.

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Does Dad Need A Nursing Home?
Dr. Jon LaPook Talks About The Tough Choice Of When To Send A Parent To A Nursing Home

One of the great blessings of my life is that my 91-year-old father, who I dearly love, lives in the apartment building next door. After 66 years of marriage, he's been living alone since my mother's death last March. He is still sharp as a tack, as he might say.

To read the full article Does Dad Need A Nursing Home?, click here.

Active ImageCDC Finds Uptick of salmonella Cases From Frogs, But Other Pets Can Infect, Too

Salmonella's back. Government officials announced this week that salmonella carried by your cute little green friends -- this time frogs -- have caused yet another outbreak in children. Aquatic pet frogs are under fire this week after 48 people in 25 states came down with salmonella serotype typhimurium, according to the U.S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

To read the full article Kiss a Frog and Get Salmonella?, click here.

Active ImageGeneral Mills' Pledge to Cut Sugar in Kids' Cereals Has Nutrition Experts Buzzing

The cereal giant General Mills has announced it will cut back the amount of sugar in 10 popular kids' cereals to single-digit grams of sugar per serving. As this move piqued the interest of nutritionists and other diet experts, the ABC News medical unit sent out a request for comment to some of the nation's top experts in the field.

To read the full article Experts Sound Off on Cereal, click here.

Active ImageTo PSA or Not to PSA, that is the Question

By Allen Lawrence, M.D.

In 2007, it is estimated that 218,890 men were diagnosed as having prostate cancer in the U.S. It is further estimated that 1out of every 6 men living in the U.S. will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during in his lifetime. In 2006, an estimated 27,350 men died from prostate cancer within the United States. The median age of death from prostate cancer from 2000 through 2004 was 80 years, and 71% of deaths occurred in men older than 75 years. African-American men have a substantially higher prostate cancer incidence rate than white men (217.5 vs. 134.5 cases per 100,000 men) and more than twice the prostate cancer mortality rate of white men (56.1 vs. 23.4 deaths per 100 000 men).

normalprostate-2.jpgStudies tell us that a substantial number of prostate cancer cases detected using current screening methods including PSA will never cause any symptoms during most of these patients’ lifetime. Modeling studies based on U.S. incidence data suggest that degree of prostate cancer is overdiagnosed in the ranging of between 29% and 44% of all prostate cancer cases detected by PSA screening. Because patients with this "pseudo-disease" receive no benefit from, and may be harmed by, prostate cancer screening and treatment, prostate cancer detection in this population constitutes an important potential burden.


PSA Testing, Yes or Now, The World is Waiting


Since the development of the PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) test the medical community has stressed that PSA testing was an important virtually mandatory on a yearly basis for men 50 to 70 years of age. For men over 70 years of age however, the criteria has not been as clear. In recent months with the release of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) update report on PSA, we may now have better answers for men 70 years of age or older.

normalprostate.jpgAfter review of many studies performed in the U.S. and abroad the USPSTF has updated their criteria published in August 2008 to more firmly suggest that while evidence is still unclear and inconclusive, evidence now appears to show that PSA testing in men over 75 years of age may lead to more harm than good. The issue is not so much the dangers of the test procedure itself, but rather the fact as one spokes person put it: “The PSA test is not a good test. We are not able to find quality evidence to find for or against the use of PSA testing for men 75 years of age or older.”

The issue is whether or not the PSA test is a good test and whether it can help the physician differentiate men who have prostate cancer and need treatment from those who have prostate cancer and do not need to be treated.

In the end, the question regarding PSA testing becomes, “Does PSA screening test lead to more benefit or more harm?” The USPSTF update report suggests that this is still unclear. An abnormal PSA inevitably leads to biopsy, biopsy, if positive for Prostate cancer, will inevitably lead to surgery or some other form of treatment. In most men over 75 years of age, the treatment of prostate cancer (whether actually is necessary or not) is associated with significant harm and for many of  men these harms and injuries will endure and cause problems for them for many years. All this may happen while treating a condition that most likely would never have caused them any significant ill effects during the remaining life time.

Abnormalprostate.jpgProstate cancer is the most common nonskin cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death among men in the United States. However, in men 75 years of age or older USPSTF suggests that “the absolute risk reduction associated with PSA screening was 0.71 deaths per 1000 men.”  This means that “1410 men would need to be screened and 48 cases of prostate cancer would need to be treated to prevent 1 death.” Stated differently, 47 of the 48 men treated because of an abnormal PAS would ultimately have to live with potential side effects and consequences from the treatment whether it us hormonal therapy, surgery, or radiation therapy. Complications from prostate treatment can and often do include impotency, erectile dysfunction, urinary incontinence, bowel dysfunction, chronic pain, and even death for a condition which if not treated most likely would have caused no problem to these men at all.

This does not also include the small harms such as pain and discomfort associated with prostate biopsy nor the psychological effects of false-positive test results which may affect hundreds of other men where cancer of the process is ultimately ruled out.

In men younger than age 75 years, the USPSTF claims that it still has found no significant evidence to determine whether treatment for prostate cancer after abnormal PSA screening improves health outcomes compared with treatment after clinical detection.

While the USPSTF concludes that for men younger than age 75 years, the benefits of screening for prostate cancer are uncertain and the balance of benefits and harms cannot be determined, for men 75 years or older, there is moderate certainty that the harms of PSA screening for prostate cancer outweigh the benefits.


Conclusion

In men younger than age 75 years, the USPSTF could not determine the degree of benefit from PSA screening for prostate cancer because of low certainty about the magnitude of benefits of screening and treatment.

Given the uncertainties and controversy surrounding prostate cancer screening in men younger than age 75 years, a clinician should not order the PSA test without first discussing with the patient the potential but uncertain benefits and the known harms of prostate cancer screening and treatment. Men should be informed of the gaps in the evidence and should be assisted in considering their personal preferences before deciding whether to be tested or not.

The USPSTF is now considering suggesting that men 75 years of age or older no longer be routinely screened with PSA testing. The risks, benefits and options should be routinely discussed with the patient and the decision left to the patient after understanding all of the facts involved in making this decision.

In each situation the patient should be instructed that current management strategies for localized prostate cancer can and do include watchful waiting (observation with palliative treatment for symptoms only), active surveillance (periodic monitoring with conversion to curative treatment for signs of disease progression), radical prostatectomy, external-beam radiation therapy, and brachytherapy (or radioactive seed implantation therapy) and rarely, hormonal suppression therapy.

Unless otherwise indicated in specific situations the USPSTF appears to be suggesting that “PSA screening as infrequently as every 4 years could yield as much of a benefit as annual screening.”

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Oral cancers in women rising, HPV sometimes a factor

Pat Folsom, 54, knows the importance of preventive medicine. As a health care worker, she goes for scheduled checkups.

To read the full story Oral cancers in women rising, HPV sometimes a factor, click here.

Active ImageMeasure for measure, a way to cut calories

The holiday season brings with it an overabundance of advice on how to avoid gaining weight in the face of all those festive meals, cocktail parties and plates of cookies brought in by co-workers.

To read the full story Measure for measure, a way to cut calories, click here.

stressaspirations130x100.jpgI'm dreaming of a right-size Christmas

The daydreams start about this time every year: I imagine a Thanksgiving feast followed by post-turkey touch football on the beach; my children beside a picture-perfect Christmas tree and glowing menorah, gleeful over their gifts and good fortune; a rollicking New Year's dinner party with friends; and generally lots of togetherness and good cheer.

To read the full story  I'm dreaming of a right-size Christmas, click here.

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Predicting Heart Disease Risk

Consumers are well aware of the dangers of oxidative stress, if the number of juices and teas advertised as containing antioxidants is any indication. But what is the best way to measure oxidative stress – and to fight it?

To read the full story Predicting Heart Disease Risk, click here.

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Bypassing the Blues


Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) patients who were screened for depression after surgery and then cared for by a nurse-led team of health care specialists via telephone reported improved quality of life and physical function compared to those who received their doctors' usual care.

To read the full story Bypassing the Blues, click here.


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Being thankful ... you’re not like mom and dad: Holidays can provide lessons about love amid quirky family dynamics

Thanksgiving  and Christmas brings the annual mix of happy anticipation and dread as we gather at the old homestead for a day of food, celebration and family politics.

To read the full article Being thankful ... you’re not like mom and dad, click here.

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Study: Cut Global Warming, Save Lives Slashing; Carbon Emissions Would Reduce Heart, Lung Diseases, New Studies Show

Cutting global warming pollution would not only make the planet healthier, it would make people healthier too, newly released studies say.

To read the full article Study: Cut Global Warming, Save Lives, click here.

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Can Food Lower Your Cholesterol?
Dr. Jennifer Ashton Tests Our Knowledge of Cholesterol and a Heart Healthy Diet


Almost 99 million adults in the United States have what is considered borderline or high cholesterol.  In time for Christmas, CBS's  Dr. Jennifer Ashton and Harry Smith talk about foods and cholesterol.

To read the full article Can Food Lower Your Cholesterol?, click here.

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Treating trauma victims may cause its own trauma

They listen to tales of life's worst moments, but they can't go home and tell their spouses about what they've heard. Sometimes no amount of schooling is enough to shield them from taking on some of their patients' suffering.

To read the full article Treating trauma victims may cause its own trauma , click here.

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A Dream Interpretation: Tuneups for the Brain

It’s snowing heavily, and everyone in the backyard is in a swimsuit, at some kind of party: Mom, Dad, the high school principal, there’s even an ex-girlfriend. And is that Elvis, over by the piñata?

To read the full article A Dream Interpretation: Tuneups for the Brain, click here.

suicides130x100.jpgSuicides in the downturn raise worries about recession’s real cost

Coroner John White is presiding over a sad tally in this northern Indiana county, tracking rising numbers of suicides he believes are linked to the lingering recession.

To read the full story Suicides in the downturn raise worries about recession’s real cost, click here.

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Do Teen Sports Increase Risk of Teen Drinking and Violence?
Young Men Who Participate in Team Sports May Be More Likely to Fight, Drink


Conventional wisdom has always been that team sports build character, cooperation, and leadership skills. But new research suggests that being on the school football team may also be hurting your teen, especially boys.

To read the full story Do Teen Sports Increase Risk of Teen Drinking and Violence?, click here.

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Diet Sodas May Be Hard on the Kidneys
Women Who Drink 2 or More Diet Sodas Daily Double Their Risk of Kidney Function Decline, Study Shows


Diet soda may help keep your calories in check, but drinking two or more diet sodas a day may double your risk of declining kidney function, a new study shows.

To read the full story Diet Sodas May Be Hard on the Kidneys , click here.

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Chew Away Hunger With Sugar-Free Gum

People who chewed sugarless gum in the morning reduced their calorie intake at lunch by 68 calories.

To read the full story Chew Away Hunger With Sugar-Free Gum , click here.

Active ImageWhy memory lane is such a mortifying stroll
Your brain is wired to keep mental souvenirs from times you'd rather forget


Researchers hope gaining a better understanding how the brain stores memory will eventually help scientists figure out how to block disturbing memories, such as those suffered by people with post-traumatic stress disorder.

To read the full story Why memory lane is such a mortifying stroll, click here.

Active ImagePatients Are Seeking 1st, 2nd Opinions on Internet, But Some Doctors Are Leary of Misinformation with Self-Diagnosis

With so much medical information online, many Americans are playing doctor, much to the dismay of "real" doctors.

But now, instead of shunning the Internet, some physicians are embracing it, CBS News correspondent John Blackstone reports.

To read the full story  "Webnosis" the Wave of the Future?, click here.

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From Sweat to Blushing: Top 6 Body Betrayals
Some People's Uncontrolled Physical Reactions Can Dominate their Lives and Careers


For 30 years Wendy Allot had no control over the color of her face. "I'm a big time blusher," said Allot, 46, of Kirkland, Wash. "I could turn so red that it almost became a purple hue. It was not attractive or adorable -- it was humiliating."

To read the full story From Sweat to Blushing: Top 6 Body Betrayals, click here.

Active ImageAre You Working with Dangerous Germs?
"The Early Show" Takes a Closer Look at Germs Lurking in Its Workplace


Correspondent Kelly Wallace looks at how germy, and potentially disease-ridden, the workplace can be.

To read the full article Are You Working with Dangerous Germs?, click here.

Active ImageEasing Back Pain

Excellent video by The Early Show’s host Harry Smith as he speaks with Dr. Norman Marcus about tips for preventing and easing back pain. A must see.

To read the full article Easing Back Pain , click here.
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Childhood Meds Lead to Behavior Disorders?


Young animals treated with commonly prescribed drugs to treat epilepsy, mood disorders and pain develop behavioral abnormalities in adulthood, according to researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC).

To read the full article Childhood Meds Lead to Behavior Disorders? , click here.
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Scientists seek clues to obesity in the womb
Research reinforces importance of losing weight before pregnancy

When Kathy Perusse had weight-loss surgery and shed 120 pounds, she may have done more than make her own life easier.

To read the full article Scientists seek clues to obesity in the womb, click here.

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Scary Breath Holding Spells Turns Kids Blue, Leaves Parents Alarmed
Children May Seek Attention by Holding Their Breath

Last Wednesday, 1-year-old Stephen Albert was playing under the wide arm of the couch in his family's Cheverly, Md., home. But as he moved to stand up, his head collided with the couch arm and he sat back down again, hard.

To read the full article Scary Breath Holding Spells Turns Kids Blue , click here.

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One-Third of Low Back Pain Patients Recover Completely Within a Year

Got a new case of low back pain? There's a good chance you'll recover completely within a year, a new study shows.

To read the full article Bouncing Back From Low Back Pain, click here.

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 When Stress Takes a Toll on Your Teeth

With economic pressures affecting millions of Americans, dentists may have noticed a drop in patients opting for a brighter smile, but they are seeing another phenomenon: a rise in the number of teeth grinders.

To read the full article When Stress Takes a Toll on Your Teeth, click here.

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10 Unexpectedly Risky Foods
Common Foods Besides Meat Pose Health Hazards


High-profile cases of illness due to contaminated beef, such as the 1993 Jack in the Box hamburger outbreaks that killed four children, may be one reason why meat is often framed as the primary culprit of food poisoning.

To read the full article 10 Unexpectedly Risky Foods, click here.

younggirlsbreastcancer130x100.jpg'Lightning Strikes' When Young Girls Get Breast Cancer
Breast Cance
r Takes a Special Toll on Girls

Taylor Thompson was planning to spend her summer vacation by the pool with friends. Instead, she spent a month becoming very familiar with her hospital in Little Rock, Ark.

To read the full article 'Lightning Strikes' When Young Girls Get Breast Cancer, click here.

Active ImageResearchers Claim Birth Control May Influence the People You Want to Date, for the Worse

Science tells us that humans have evolved over the years to make better decisions about whom to choose as a spouse, but a growing body of research suggests that women could undo all that evolution with a simple pill many are already taking.

To read the full article Is the Pill in Control of Your Romance?, click here.

Active ImageLove, pleasure, duty: Why women have sex

What makes a woman want to have sex? Is it physical attraction? Love? Loneliness? Jealousy? Boredom? Painful menstrual cramps?

To read the full story  Love, pleasure, duty: Why women have sex, click here.

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Estrogen May Improve Colon Cancer Survival


Younger women with advanced colon cancer live slightly longer than younger men with advanced disease, but the survival advantage disappears as women age and their estrogen levels drop.

To read the full story  Estrogen May Improve Colon Cancer Survival, click here.

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Some Simple Steps for the Stressed-Out


A middle-aged, working-class woman recently came to my medical office complaining that her back had "seized up."

To read the full story  Some Simple Steps for the Stressed-Out, click here.

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Study Finds Women Wear Shoes That Cause Pain

Some women love their shoes so much it hurts. That is the conclusion of a new study that looks at the link between shoe choices and chronic foot pain.

To read the full story  Women Wear Shoes That Cause Pain, click here.

Active Image Gene Linked to Glaucoma

An international team of researchers discovered gene variants for glaucoma in a black population. The finding could lead to treatment or a cure for this disease, which causes blindness in two million Americans each year.

To read the full story  Gene Linked to Glaucoma, click here.


Active ImageSome dogs and cats reaching 15 years or more, veterinarians say

When Denice Shaughnessy’s wirehaired dachshund Chanel died last month at the age of 21, she was heralded as the world’s oldest dog, according to Guinness World Records.

To read the full story  Life in dog years: Many pets living longer, click here.
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After a Diagnosis, Someone to Help Point the Way

When Kathleen Henry’s uncle was told he had bladder cancer in May, she knew she needed help.

To read the full article After a Diagnosis, Someone to Help Point the Way, click here.

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Oral Hygiene may Prevent Cancer


Brushing and flossing brings more than pearly whites and fresh breath. New research reveals proper oral hygiene may prevent head and neck cancer.

To read the full article Oral Hygiene may Prevent Cancer, click here.

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Study: Shrinking Brain Not a Normal Part of Aging

The belief that healthy older brains are substantially smaller than healthy younger brains may stem from studies that failed to screen out people whose undetected, slowly developing brain disease was killing off cells in key areas, according to new research.

To read the full article Study: Shrinking Brain Not a Normal Part of Aging , click here.

Active ImageGooey nutrition bars fuel energy — and cavities
Athletes and on-the-go snackers hearing bad news from the dentist


“I was devastated,” says the 49-year-old mother of five from Allendale, N.J. “I had three huge cavities and I haven’t had a cavity since I was a kid.”

To read the full article Gooey nutrition bars fuel energy — and cavities, click here.

Active ImageOne Dose, Not Two, May Do for Swine Flu Vaccine
Single Dose Vaccine Would Mean More to Go Around, Researchers Say


Infectious disease experts expressed relief in light of new research released Thursday suggesting that one dose of a new vaccine against the H1N1 swine flu may be enough to grant immunity for most people against the pandemic strain.

To read the full article One Dose, Not Two, May Do for Swine Flu Vaccine, click here.

white130x100.jpgHow to avoid the most common of cancers: Skin cancer

Stephanie White is a skin cancer expert. At 41, she's had all three types of the condition: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

To read the full story How to avoid the most common of cancers: Skin cancer , click here.


Active ImageFathers' depression 'harms young'

Children whose fathers have mental health disorders are likely to have psychiatric or behavioural disorders themselves, researchers warn.

To read the full story Fathers' depression 'harms young' , click here.

Active ImageHow to avoid the most common of cancers: Skin cancer

Stephanie White is a skin cancer expert. At 41, she's had all three types of the condition: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

To read the full story How to avoid the most common of cancers: Skin cancer , click here.
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H1N1
Swine Wide Spread
Flu -CDC: 'Virtually All the U.S. Has This Virus Circulating


Even though the new H1N1 swine flu is circulating in virtually all the U.S., CDC officials say there's encouraging news.

To read the full story H1N1 Swine Flu: No State Is Immune , click here.
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Epstein-Barr Virus Linked to MS
Study Shows Common Virus May Help Trigger Multiple


Infection with Epstein-Barr virus appears to raise the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), Boston researchers report.

To read the full story Epstein-Barr Virus Linked to MS , click here.
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'How Sex Works'
Why We Look, Smell, Taste, Feel, and Act the Way We Do


Have you ever wondered exactly what attracted you to your partner? Or why you act the way you do around the opposite sex?

To read the full story 'How Sex Works' , click here.
Active ImageExperts Issue Powerful Tanning Bed Warning
Journal Rates UV Light at Tanning Salon in Same Group of Cancer Risks as Tobacco and Asbestos


Paige Wood started going to tanning salons when she was 18 years old. Now at 27, she's fighting melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer.

To read the full article Experts Issue Powerful Tanning Bed Warning, click here.
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R
emarriage Doesn't Heal All Wounds

Divorce and widowhood are bad for your health, even after you remarry. The impact of chronic illness lingers after remarriage, research at the University of Chicago and Johns Hopkins University shows.

To read the full article Remarriage Doesn't Heal All Wounds, click here.
Active ImageExperts Issue Powerful Tanning Bed Warning
Journal Rates UV Light at Tanning Salon in Same Group of Cancer Risks as Tobacco and Asbestos


Paige Wood started going to tanning salons when she was 18 years old. Now at 27, she's fighting melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer.

To read the full article Experts Issue Powerful Tanning Bed Warning, click here.

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Can Good Bacteria Really Fight the Flu?
Probiotics May Fight Against Common Cold, Flu


Cold and flu sufferers, there may be a way to head off those irritating symptoms before they cause you to miss work or school.

To read the full article Can Good Bacteria Really Fight the Flu?, click here.
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Can Certain Foods 'Arouse' Your Brain?

Expert: Abnormal Brain Activity Linked to a 'Helpless' Overeating


Wendy Wessler, who is divorced and lives on New York's Long Island, lost 150 pounds after gastric bypass surgery, but the weight is creeping back. She says she just can't understand why she can't say no to food.

To read the full article Can Certain Foods 'Arouse' Your Brain?, click here.
Active ImageNo-Fat Meals and Other Diet Mistakes
Nutritionists Say Dieters Can Miss the Point, and Flavor, When Eating Healthy


Grocery stores offer a myriad of ways for shoppers to think they are buying healthful food -- low-fat dressing, vitamin-infused cereals, or the trendy sports drink.

To read the full article No-Fat Meals and Other Diet Mistakes, click here.


Active ImageTossing Out the Diet and Embracing the Fat

Five-foot-nine and 184 pounds, Kathryn Griffith, a retired teacher in Oakland, Calif., counted calories for decades, trying everything from the grapefruit diet to a regimen based on cabbage soup. She also did Weight Watchers — 27 times. “I knew it wouldn’t be successful, but I went back anyway,” she said.

To read the full article Tossing Out the Diet and Embracing the Fat, click here.
Active ImageHeavy Drinking Linked to Prostate Cancer

Although current research regarding the relationship between alcohol consumption and prostate cancer is still inconclusive, researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, led by Zhihong Gong Ph.D., found that men who reported regular heavy drinking -- more than four drinks a day on more than five days per week -- were twice as likely to be diagnosed with high-grade prostate cancer.

To read the full article Heavy Drinking Linked to Prostate Cancer, click here.

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Marriage thrives despite our evolving sex lives
Most women tie the knot by 40, statistics show — so why all the fretting?


It may have worked as a plotline for “Sex and the City,” but according to new  government figures, very few American women need fear being an “old maid.”

To read the full article Marriage thrives despite our evolving sex lives, click here.
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The Earliest Fetal Memory?
Dutch Doctors Say the Unborn may Have Memories by the 30th Week of Pregnancy


Like any prospective mom, as 21-year-old Angela Morton goes through her first pregnancy the family stories of her own baby years begin to emerge -- including her mother's trick of calming her with Aerosmith's 1988 song "Angel" anytime she was a fussing as an infant.

To read the full article The Earliest Fetal Memory?, click here.
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Top Five Crucial Medical Tests for Men
Find Out Which Exams Are a Must to Maintain Good Health


Many men aren't proactive when it comes to their personal health care needs. A Men's Health magazine and CNN survey found one-third of men would not go to the doctor, even if they were experiencing major health problems, such as severe chest pains or shortness of breath -- both of which are signs for heart disease.

To read the full article Top Five Crucial Medical Tests for Men, click here.

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A Prescription That Can Give You Paws


Caring goes both ways. People who take good care of their pets protect them -- and the whole household -- by preventing diseases from entering the home.

To read the full article A Prescription That Can Give You Paws, click here.


Active ImageJust how bad are your health vices?
What's forgivable, what's regrettable and how to get healthier


If you feel guilty about certain less-than-healthy habits — either from your past or present — you're in good company.

To read the full article Just how bad are your health vices? , click here.
Active ImageProposed Tylenol restrictions worry patients
FDA is considering reduced maximum dose, ban on Vicodin and Percocet


Proposed limits on Tylenol, a painkiller as common as pain itself, have left many consumers fearful, confused and wondering where to turn for relief.

To read the full article Proposed Tylenol restrictions worry patients, click here.

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Internet-Based Therapy Shows Promise for Insomnia
Can't sleep? Computer-based therapy shows promise for insomnia


Sleepless people sometimes use the Internet to get through the night. Now a small study shows promising results for insomniacs with nine weeks of Internet-based therapy.

To read the full article Internet-Based Therapy Shows Promise for Insomnia, click here.
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Foods Face Tougher Path From Farm to Table
Government Rules Aim to Prevent Salmonella in Eggs, E. Coli in Beef


The Harvest Lane Farm in Pennsylvania is the vanguard in the fight to keep salmonella out of eggs.

To read the full article Foods Face Tougher Path From Farm to Table, click here.


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5 Ways to Master Your Emotions

A sound body deserves a sound mind. But if you're feeling blue, seeing red or seeking refuge from the proverbial skies of gray, you can't enjoy the optimal health you work so hard to achieve.

To read the full article 5 Ways to Master Your Emotions, click here.

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Study: Some Doctors Don't Talk About Abnormal Results


The old saying 'no news is good news' might not necessarily be true when it comes to your doctor. 

To read the full article Study: Some Doctors Don't Talk About Abnormal Results, click here.
Active ImageCholesterol-Lowering Therapy Shows Big Gains

The percentage of patients who lowered their elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) "bad" cholesterol to within target levels has nearly doubled in the last decade, according to a recent survey.

To read the full article Cholesterol-Lowering Therapy Shows Big Gains, click here.
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Active Social Life May Slow Signs of Aging

Less frequent participation in social activity among older adults is associated with a more rapid rate of motor function decline, according to a recent report.

To read the full article Active Social Life May Slow Signs of Aging, click here.
Active ImageTeens who move a lot have twice suicide risk
Moving 3 or more times can contribute to feelings of isolation, study says


Parents may be so distracted by the details of a move that they don't notice what a big impact.

To read the full article Teens who move a lot have twice suicide risk, click here.
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Dads Play Bigger Role in Fetus Development

Fathers may contribute more to the conception and development of a fetus than previously thought.

To read the full article Dads Play Bigger Role in Fetus Development, click here.


Active ImageStudy Links Depression to Alzheimer's Disease

Research shows that the popular Alzheimer's drug Donepezil may delay the progression to Alzheimer's disease in depressed people with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI).

To read the full article Study Links Depression to Alzheimer's Disease, click
Active ImageBlame Your Gray Hair on Stress

Those pesky gray hairs that tend to crop up with age really are signs of stress.

To read the full article Blame Your Gray Hair on Stress , click here.
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Red Yeast Rice Helps Reduce Cholesterol
Over-the-Counter Supplement Is an Alternative to Statin Drugs


Red yeast rice -- it's been a staple of some Asian countries for more than 1,000 years. As food coloring, it gives Peking Duck its signature red glow. And as herbal medicine, it lowers cholesterol levels.

To read the full article Red Yeast Rice Helps Reduce Cholesterol, click here.

 

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Zicam Zinc Nasal Sprays May Damage Sense of Smell, FDA Says
Federal Health Officials Warn Manufacturer to Cease Marketing, Seek FDA Approval


When 45-year-old Mary Ann Brandon of Tyler, Texas, felt a cold coming on two years ago, she reached for a treatment she had never tried before -- Zicam nasal spray.

To read the full article Zicam Zinc Nasal Sprays May Damage Sense of Smell, FDA Says, click here.


Active ImageGroup Therapy for Depression

Group therapy may be the best medicine for adolescent children of depressed adults.

To read the full story Group Therapy for Depression, click here.
Active ImageHealthy Living Still Eludes Americans
Study Shows Recommendations on Diet and Exercise Aren't Getting Through


Americans know what they need to do to ward off cardiovascular disease and live longer, but despite health recommendations, most still aren't making smart lifestyle choices, new research indicates.

To read the full article Healthy Living Still Eludes Americans, click here.
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Risks of Refusing Childhood Vaccines


Unvaccinated children are 23 times more likely to get whooping cough compared to fully immunized children, according to a new study.

To read the full article Risks of Refusing Childhood Vaccines, click here.

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Menopause May Cause Learning Troubles

The transition to menopause affects more than just your body; it may actually temporarily cause learning troubles for some women, according to the largest study of its kind.

To read the full article Menopause May Cause Learning Troubles, click here.


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Lung cancer deaths linked to hormone pills

Findings suggest that smokers should stop taking estrogen-progestin

There's more troubling news about hormone therapy for menopause symptoms: Lung cancer seems more likely to prove fatal in women who are taking estrogen-progestin pills, a study suggests.

To read the full article Lung cancer deaths linked to hormone pills, click here.
Active ImageGet To A Healthy Weight Before Pregnancy
Study: Babies Born To Overweight Mothers Have Greater Risk Of Premature Birth


Eating for two? New guidelines are setting how much weight women should gain during pregnancy - surprisingly little if they're already overweight.

To read the full article Get To A Healthy Weight Before Pregnancy, click here.
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Drug Combos Linked To Breast Cancer Risk
Study: Risk Increases If Breast Cancer Survivors Use Certain Antidepressants With Tamoxifen


Breast cancer survivors risk having their disease come back if they use certain antidepressants while also taking the cancer prevention drug tamoxifen, worrisome new research shows.

To read the full article Drug Combos Linked To Breast Cancer Risk, click here.
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No Benefit From Surgery for Metastatic Colon Cancer
Chemotherapy Alone May Be Best for Most Patients, Research Suggests


Surgeons who plan to operate to remove the original tumors from patients with metastatic colon cancer might do well to put down their scalpels and rely on chemotherapy instead, according to a new study.

To read the full article No Benefit From Surgery for Metastatic Colon Cancer, click here.
Active ImageCT Lung Cancer Screening Leaves a Trail of False Positives
One in Three Scans May Incorrectly Indicate Cancer's Presence, New Study Says


A high-tech scanning technique that doctors hoped to use for fast, reliable lung cancer screening has turned out to do its job too well.

To read the full article CT Lung Cancer Screening Leaves a Trail of False Positives, click here.
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Prostate cancer yet another worry for women
Male patients move on after cancer treatment, while wives keep agonizing


Women worry about a lot — their children, relationships, jobs, health, hair and so on. But new research out of Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York has found that some women are worrying about something rather unexpected: prostate cancer.

To read the full story Prostate cancer yet another worry for women, click here.
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Cancer causes: Popular myths about the causes of cancer

Misconceptions about cancer causes can lead to unnecessary worry about your health. Find out whether there's any truth to these common myths about the causes of cancer.

To read the full article Cancer causes: Popular myths about the causes of cancer, click here.

Active ImageThe Autopsy, a Search for Reassurance

My sister had barely taken her last breath when a nurse appeared in the doorway of her room in the intensive care unit and asked if our family wanted an autopsy.

To read the full article The Autopsy, a Search for Reassurance, click here.

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New Tool Predicts Alzheimer's?


A new tool may be able to predict whether you or a loved one are at risk for Alzheimer's disease.

To read the full article New Tool Predicts Alzheimer's?, click here.
Active ImageParents' Rights, Judges' Rules

In the battle between families and the courts over medical treatment for kids, who has the last word?

Last week, Daniel Hauser sat quietly in a Minneapolis courtroom while adults debated how to combat the Hodgkin's lymphoma that has invaded his body. Doctors wanted the 13-year-old boy to undergo chemotherapy and radiation. His parents were resisting: their religion advocated natural and homeopathic methods.

To read the full article Parents' Rights, Judges' Rules, click here.

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A
nother Face Of Alcoholism
High-Functioning Alcoholics Live Seemingly Successful Lives While Drinking Heavily


The face of the alcoholism may not always be what you think. Twenty percent of people who have the disease, according to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, are actually educated, seemingly successful people.

To read the full article Another Face Of Alcoholism , click here.
Active ImageStudy Shows Some Supplements May Affect the Impact of Exercise on Insulin Sensitivity

Taking antioxidant supplements -- specifically, vitamin C and vitamin E pills -- may dull one of the benefits of exercise, new research shows.

To read the full story Do Antioxidants Curb an Exercise Benefit?, click here.

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Fighting Flab with Probiotics

That’s the take home message from Finnish researchers who studied the use of probiotics – also known as “good” bacteria -- in 256 pregnant women.

To read the full story Fighting Flab with Probiotics, click here.
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Alzheimer’s Breakthrough?

MIT researchers who were previously able to reverse the signs of Alzheimer’s disease in mice have now identified the specific gene involved in the process.

To read the full story Alzheimer’s Breakthrough?, click here.
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Whatever Your Complaint About UV Protectors, We've Got You Covered

Despite elegant new formulations and innovative packaging that makes sunscreen application a snap, too much skin is still going uncovered.

To read the full story Sunscreens You'll Love to Wear, click here.

Active ImageHealthier Alternatives to Salty Meals at Your Favorite Chain Restaurants

Salt: It's the not-so-secret ingredient in tasty treats like chicken fingers, onion rings and tomato juice.

To read the full story Are You Eating Too Much Salt?, click here.

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Hydroxycut Diet Aids Recalled After Warning


Federal drug regulators warned consumers Friday to stop using the popular Hydroxycut line of weight-loss products, citing reports of a death due to liver failure and other instances of serious health problems.

To read the full story Hydroxycut Diet Aids Recalled After Warning , click here.


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Kidney Disease Linked to Cancer


Men with even moderate kidney disease may be at increased risk for certain cancers, including those of the lungs and urinary track.

To read the full story Kidney Disease Linked to Cancer, click here.

Active ImagePork is safe to eat, health officials say
Message comes a day after virus found in pigs on a farm in Canada


Pork, ham and sausages are safe to eat, the World Health Organization said Sunday.

To read the full story Pork is safe to eat, health officials say, click here.

Active ImageEXCERPT: 'How Sex Works'
Why We Look, Smell, Taste, Feel, and Act the Way We Do


Have you ever wondered exactly what attracted you to your partner? Or why you act the way you do around the opposite sex?

To read the full story EXCERPT: 'How Sex Works', click here.


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Mexico Plans to Lift Swine Flu Shutdown
Nationwide Shutdown on Schools, Businesses Appears Set to End; Some Fears Persist


Mexican officials announced today they would allow most nonessential businesses to reopen Wednesday, after it ordered them closed Friday after the deadly outbreak of the swine flu virus.

To read the full story Mexico Plans to Lift Swine Flu Shutdown, click here.
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Diabetes? Some beat it, but are they cured?


JoAnne Zoller Wagner's diagnosis as prediabetic wasn't enough to compel her to change her habits and lose 30 pounds.

To read the full article Diabetes? Some beat it, but are they cured?, click here.


Active ImagePsoriasis link to health problems

Women with psoriasis have an increased risk of developing diabetes and high blood pressure, a study suggests.

To read the full article Psoriasis link to health problems, click here.
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What Are Friends for? A Longer Life

In the quest for better health, many people turn to doctors, self-help books or herbal supplements. But they overlook a powerful weapon that could help them fight illness and depression, speed recovery, slow aging and prolong life: their friends.

To read the full article What Are Friends for? A Longer Life, click here.

Active ImageMusic for the Heart

The sweet sound of music may benefit heart patients who undergo treatment for their disease.

To read the full article Music for the Heart, click here.

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Dieters’ best intentions hijacked by their brains
Yummy snacks trigger vicious cycle of cravings, former FDA chief warns


Not apples or carrots. The scientist who once led the government's attack on addictive cigarettes can't wander through part of San Francisco without craving a local shop's chocolate-covered pretzels. Stop at one cookie? Rarely.

To read the full article Dieters’ best intentions hijacked by their brains, click here.
Active ImageAre They Freshness Deadlines Or Guidelines? Expert's Answers May Surprise You
On average, a family of four throws out more than 120 pounds of food each month. But plenty of perishables have a shelf life long beyond their "sell-by" dates. So, just how strictly should you adhere to expiration dates?

To read the full article The Truth Behind "Sell-By" Dates On Foods, click here.
Heart-Health Foods

Over the years you have probably heard lots of input on which foods are good for your heart and which are not. A recent investigation has looked at the information from nearly 200 studies  involving millions of people. The results of this investigation produced a recently published article touting a much shorter list of foods you should be including in your diet. The list appears to much shorter than we would have imagined or has been previously suggested.

This new “short” list of heart-healthy foods contains no surprises highly recommended are vegetables, nuts and foods that would normally be considered part of the Mediterranean diet. These are the “good" heart foods. On the "bad" lis, once again are no significant surprises as we see high on this list starchy carbs like white bread and the trans fats found in many cookies and fried foods such as fried chicken and French fries.

There are however still some "questionable" foods such as meat (beef and pork particularly), and well as eggs and milk.

With few changes positive or negative and still many unanswered questions about a number of specific foods there is still confusion around what we should and should not eat.

The study did however, clearly demonstrate that smoking is neither good for the heart nor for your  lungs. Within this investigation multiple studies when certain food or specific diets showed a strong link with better heart health, they put these food or diet at the top of the list.

In the end this study reaffirmed the benefits of a Mediterranean diet, a diet which is rich in vegetables, nuts, whole grains, fish and olive oil when compared to a Western diet, heavy on processed meats, red meat, refined grains and high-fat dairy.

Their conclusion was that we should look at eating differently if we are not already using a Mediterranean style diet. It was also suggested that what you chose to eat is really about the totality of your usual eating pattern, don’t worry if you eat a hot dog on opening day of baseball season, just eat healthy and heart-healthy foods the rest of the time.

The specific study referenced here was supported by the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada and the Canadian Institutes of Health.


For more information on the Mediterranean Diet and other Heart-Healthy Diets,
click here.

Active ImageKids Can Make a Beautiful Marriage Ugly
Study: Marital Satisfaction Takes a Dive When Baby Arrives


The birth of children has an immediate negative impact on even blissfully happy couples, raising stress and reducing satisfaction levels of husbands and wives, new research says.

To read the full article Kids Can Make a Beautiful Marriage Ugly, click here.


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More Kids with Bad Teeth?

More and more children are being admitted to the hospital for tooth decay and other dental conditions, according to a new study.

To read the full article More Kids with Bad Teeth?, click here.


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Heart-Healthy Foods

Over the years you have probably heard lots of input on which foods are good for your heart and which are not. A recent investigation has looked at the information from nearly 200 studies  involving millions of people. The results of this investigation produced a recently published article touting a much shorter list of foods you should be including in your diet. The list appears to much shorter than we would have imagined or has been previously suggested.

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Feds Waking Up To Nightmare Of Bedbugs
EPA Hosts Summit To Address Nationwide Outbreak Of Tiny Reddish-Brown Insects

The federal government is waking up to what has become a growing nightmare in many parts of the country - a bed bug outbreak.

To read the full article Feds Waking Up To Nightmare Of Bedbugs, click here.

Active ImageStudy: Link Between Diabetes And Dementia
CBS Evening News: Letting Blood Sugar Get Too Low May Damage The Brain


A study was released Tuesday that has important information for older diabetics, reports CBS News medical correspondent Dr. Jon LaPook. More than 23.5 million Americans have diabetes, and half of them are over 60. Researchers have discovered a link between that disease and dementia.


To read the full article Link Between Diabetes And Dementia, click here.


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Broccoli Sprouts Ward Off Stomach Cancer


People who carry the H. pylori bacteria in their guts are at higher risk for stomach cancer. Eating as little as 2.5 oz of broccoli a day can prevent stomach cancer.

To read the full article Broccoli Sprouts Ward Off Stomach Cancer, click here.

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Blood sugar can be anyone's problem
High-normal levels are often overlooked, but can harm your health


The average American consumes more than a pound of refined sugar a week. It sounds unbelievable until you realize that sugar goes by more than 50 names and is an ingredient in virtually all processed foods, from your morning doughnut to the ketchup on your burger.

To read the full article Blood sugar can be anyone's problem, click here.


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Programs offer free, cheaper prescription meds
1 in 5 in U.S. skips drugs or split pills to save money, but help is available


Jaimy Gerler was frantic this past winter when the doctor prescribed yet another costly medicine for her toddler daughter, whose allergies had landed her in the hospital the winter before.

To read the full article Programs offer free, cheaper prescription meds, click here.

Active ImageEarly Alzheimer's Increases Driving Hazard
Study: More Mistakes Made Behind The Wheel Among Those With Early Signs Of Disease


Scientists are creating tests to show when it's time for people with early Alzheimer's disease to stop driving.

To read the full article Early Alzheimer's Increases Driving Hazard, click here.

Active ImageRestless Legs Syndrome Linked to Obesity, Fat Waistlines
Overweight Americans Face Double the Risk of Getting the Neurological Disorder


A new study suggests that people who have big bellies are more likely to develop restless legs syndrome (RLS), a condition that makes sleep or rest nearly impossible.

To read the full article Restless Legs Syndrome Linked to Obesity, Fat Waistlines, click here.

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Overuse of CT Scans Risky Business


CT scans are great at helping doctors determine what’s wrong. But too many of these scans might be promoting illness rather than helping to diagnose it.

To read the full article Overuse of CT Scans Risky Business, click here.
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Five-in-one Heart Health Pill Deemed Safe


A five-in-one pill that may cut a person's risk of cardiovascular disease by 50 to 60 percent was well-tolerated by participants in the first study to evaluate the pill in humans.

To read the full article Five-in-one Heart Health Pill Deemed Safe, click here.


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Understanding Skin Cancer


A case of mistaken identity may ultimately end up benefiting people with the most deadly form of skin cancer.

To read the full article Understanding Skin Cancer, click here.


Active ImageFor those who swear by antioxidant-rich food and drink, two new studies show those health benefits can wane if the products are stored for too long a time.

To read the full article Antioxidant-rich foods lose impact if packed too long, click here.

Active ImageBuy in bulk, find a CSA, plant a garden and know when to go organic

It took a vicious case of Lyme disease to convince Keith Schorsch to change his diet — and his family's. The 44-year-old Seattle resident credits his recovery to nutritional improvements, and ever since then he has insisted on organic, unprocessed, and low-sugar everything.

To read the full article Eat better — for less money, click here.

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STDs May Change Stance on Circumcision
Study Affirms Circumcision Benefits -- Leaving Insurance, Doctors and Patients at Odds


Some doctors are calling for a slight change in America's thinking about circumcision after the latest -- and largest -- study in a series of investigations in Africa showed that circumcision may significantly reduce the risk of contracting herpes and HPV.

To read the full article STDs May Change Stance on Circumcision, click here.
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Vertigo Linked to Osteoporosis


People with osteoporosis are much more likely to experience vertigo, an inner ear disorder that causes dizziness. This suggests a problem with calcium metabolism in vertigo sufferers, according to a new study.

To read the full article Vertigo Linked to Osteoporosis, click here.

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Diabetics, Older Patients Benefit From Heart Bypass


It may be a more invasive surgery, but new research shows heart bypass surgery leads to longer lives than angioplasty for specific groups of patients.

To read the full article Older Patients Benefit From Heart Bypass, click here.

Active ImageHealth Insurance Industry Offers To Phase Out Controversial Practice If All Americans Are Required To Get Coverage

The health insurance industry offered Tuesday for the first time to curb its controversial practice of charging higher premiums to people with a history of medical problems.

To read the full article Insurers May Nix Charging Sick People More, click here.

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Research: Diabetes Ups Alzheimer’s Risk
Damage May Start When Body Loses Ability To Regulate Blood Sugar


Diabetes can hurt the heart, the eyes and the kidneys. New research indicates a more ominous link: That diabetes increases the risk of getting Alzheimer's disease and may speed dementia once it strikes.

To read the full article Research: Diabetes Ups Alzheimer’s Risk, click here.

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Can Peanut Allergy Be Cured By Peanuts?
Some Kids Now Allergy-Free Thanks To Tiny Amounts Of The Very Food That Endangered Them


Scientists have the first evidence that life-threatening peanut allergies may be cured one day.

A few kids now are allergy-free thanks to a scary treatment - tiny amounts of the very food that endangered them.

To read the full article Can Peanut Allergy Be Cured By Peanuts, click here.

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Finding Religion at the End of Life: Patients of Faith Seek Lifesaving Care
Study Shows Religion Often Guides Final Decisions


Having entered hospice care, Ruth Holt, 81, said her faith will not motivate her to seek more aggressive treatment for her terminal colon cancer.

To read the full article Finding Religion at the End of Life: Patients of Faith Seek Lifesaving Care, click here.


Active ImageSome Odd, Others Bizarre - These Items Are Not Just for Foodies Anymore

In the industry they're known as exotic or specialty produce, but consumers might think of these fruits and vegetables as unusual, uncommon or simply strange.

To read the full article 13 Weird Fruits and Vegetables: Exotic Produce, click here.

Active ImageUS births break baby boom record, topping 4.3 million; 40 pct of babies born out-of-wedlock

Remember the baby boom? No, not the one after World War II. More babies were born in the United States in 2007 than any other year in the nation's history — and a wedding band made increasingly little difference in the matter.

To read the full article US Births Break Record; 40 Pct out-of-Wedlock, click here.

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How Does My Risk For Heart Disease Change As I Get Older?

Our risk of heart disease increases every day as we age. The older you are, the higher your risk.

To read the full article How Does My Risk For Heart Disease Change As I Get Older?, click here.

Active ImageCheck the Neck for Heart Risk
New Study Shows Neck Width May Reveal If You're a Heart Attack Candidate


When a doctor determines your risk for heart disease, he or she might look at your weight, cholesterol level and blood pressure. But soon, they may also look at your neck.

To read the full article Check the Neck for Heart Risk, click here.


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Less Salt Will Cut Heart Disease Rate
Study Shows Small Cutback in Salt Intake Will Reduce Heart Disease Cases


You'd better start reading the sodium amounts on food packages.

To read the full story Less Salt Will Cut Heart Disease Rate , click here.

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Red or White: Could one Prevent Breast Cancer?


No matter if it is Merlot or Chardonnay, neither wine is going to decrease the risk for breast cancer. This is the conclusion of a new study that evaluates the effect of red versus white wine on breast cancer risk.

To read the full story Red or White: Could one Prevent Breast Cancer?, click here.
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Love Handles put Squeeze on Lungs


There’s yet another reason to eliminate love handles. A new study links abdominal obesity to decreased lung function. Excess weight around the waist is already associated with diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease and other health problems collectively known as “metabolic syndrome.”

To read the full story Love Handles put Squeeze on Lungs, click here.
Active ImageAre Prostate Cancer Tests Worth the Trauma?
Common Prostate Cancer Test Means Unneeded Treatment, Study Says; Some Docs Disagree


New research is adding fuel to a fiery debate over who should be  be screened for prostate cancer.

To read the full story Are Prostate Cancer Tests Worth the Trauma?, click here.

Active ImageHow to Know When You're a Booze Hound
'Rethinking Drinking' Uses Interactive Tools to Warn Users of Their Alcohol Habits


Whether you're a college student prone to binge-drinking or a professional who regularly drinks a glass of wine with dinner, specialists are encouraging drinkers of all kinds to pause and consider whether their imbibing could be a precursor to alcoholism.

To read the full story Do You Drink Too Much? How to Know When You're a Booze Hound, click here.

Active ImageMore Men Are Urged to Take Drug Against Prostate Cancer

Millions of middle-aged American men who get tested regularly for prostate cancer but show no signs of the illness might benefit from taking a drug that substantially lowers their risk of getting the disease, according to new guidelines issued by two leading medical groups that treat prostate cancer.

To read the full story More Men Are Urged to Take Drug Against Prostate Cancer, click here.

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Small Changes Can Decrease Risk of Stroke

Making simple changes to your lifestyle could dramatically decrease your risk of having a stroke.

To read the full story Small Changes Can Decrease Risk of Stroke, click here.

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Vitamin D and Fighting Cold & Flu?

A dose of vitamin D every day could be the trick to fight the common cold and cases of the flu.

To read the full story Vitamin D Fights Cold & Flu?, click here.

Active ImageDoctor-tested tips to help you breathe easier, sneeze less and sleep better

Allergies are the result of an immune system run amok. They develop when your immune system overreacts to a normally harmless substance such as pollen, cat dander or dust.

To read the full story 10 ways to minimize the misery of allergies, click here.

Active ImageHealth Guidelines Ignored Before Pregnancy

Study Shows Many Women Don't Follow Guidelines On Diet And Nutrition

Few women follow lifestyle and nutritional guidelines before becoming pregnant, even when pregnancy is contemplated to some degree, a new study shows.

To read the full story Health Guidelines Ignored Before Pregnancy, click here.

Active ImageSurvey Shows Smokers Would Quit To Protect Critters From Secondhand Smoke

Smokers are motivated to quit the habit to protect their pets from secondhand smoke, a new survey shows.

To read the full story Risk To Pets Motivates Smokers to Quit, click here.

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Drink for Your Heart but Abstain for Cancer?

Large Study Shows Drinking a Few Times a Week Can Increase Your Risk for Some Cancers

To read the full story Drink for Your Heart but Abstain for Cancer?, click here.

Active ImageBe Religious About What Really Matters; Take Shortcuts With the Rest. Check Out Our Guide to Being a Sensible Slacker

It's not your imagination: Our bodies simply become higher maintenance after 40. Indulgences of food or drink are quicker to take revenge. Muscles require more maintenance.

To read the full article Health Rules You Can Rewrite After 40, click here.
Active ImageThe Truth Behind 13 of Your Body's Physical Quirks -- and Easy Moves That Leave You Feeling Your Best

To read the full article The Odd Body Explained , click here.

Active ImageBe Religious About What Really Matters; Take Shortcuts With the Rest. Check Out Our Guide to Being a Sensible Slacker

It's not your imagination: Our bodies simply become higher maintenance after 40. Indulgences of food or drink are quicker to take revenge. Muscles require more maintenance.

To read the full article Health Rules You Can Rewrite After 40, click here.

Active ImageHow Teens Make Decisions

A new study provides some explanation as to why young teens might practice poor judgment when it comes drugs and having sex.  

To read the full story How Teens Make Decisions, click here.

Active ImageFeeling frazzled? 8 ways to decrease stress
Meditation, music can help lower body's fight-or-flight response


Poor cortisol: It means well but just doesn't know when to quit. Produced by your adrenal glands, this "stress hormone" helps regulate blood pressure and the immune system during a sudden crisis, whether a physical attack or an emotional setback.

To read the full story Feeling frazzled? 8 ways to decrease stress, click here.

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Eating Heart-Healthy In Restaurants
Peter Moore of Men's Health Magazine Tells How, On The Early Show


Eating out doesn't have to mean consuming foods that contribute to heart disease.

On The Early Show Tuesday, Men's Health magazine Editor Peter Moore discussed healthy options in three different types of cuisines, Italian, Mexican, and Chinese, and talked about menu "warning" words that can hint at unhealthy choices, and menu "friends" that could point to the opposite.

To read the full article Eating Heart-Healthy In Restaurants, click here.


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Oh, behave! Embarrassing body quirks, solved
Banish bewildering skin tags, dry mouth, spider veins or flatulence


You do right by your body, and in return you expect it to behave — but as the years go by, it can start to rebel and embarrass you on a regular basis. From excess gas to skin tags, these minor physical betrayals don't threaten your health, but they can present major challenges to your self-esteem and body image and make you feel older than you are.

To read the full story Oh, behave! Embarrassing body quirks, solved, click here.

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Tips on Prevention and Information on New Treatments


About 30 million people in the United States are believed to suffer from migraine headaches, with women three times more likely than men to experience them.

To read the full story Migraines 101: Symptoms, Triggers, Treatment, click here.

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Valentine's Day still rich in romance, sex

The sluggish economy might make sweethearts a little stingier when buying Valentine's Day gifts, but it hasn't slowed down their sex lives.

To read the full story Valentine's Day still rich in romance, sex, click here.

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There is nothing like the suggestion of a cancer riskto freak out a parent, especially one of the hypereducated, ecoconscious ilk. So you can imagine the reaction when a recent USA Today investigation of air quality around the nation’s schools singled out those in the smugly green hamlet of Berkeley, Calif., as being among the worst in the country.

To read the full story The Toxic Paradox, click here.

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Statins Fall Short in Breast Cancer Prevention

They've been hailed as miracle drugs for the heart, but statins aren't getting rave reviews when it comes to cancer prevention.

To read the full story Statins Fall Short in Breast Cancer Prevention, click here.

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Marijuana may raise testicular cancer risk
Study: Long-term pot smokers face highest chance of developing disease


Marijuana use may increase the risk of developing testicular cancer, in particular a more aggressive form of the disease, according to a U.S. study published on Monday.

To read the full story Marijuana may raise testicular cancer risk, click here.

Active ImageCBS Evening News Exclusive: Vaccine-Safety Group Study Shows Higher Instance Of Medical Side-Effects Than Another Vaccine

There are new concerns about Gardasil, the vaccine that prevents a virus that caused cervical cancer. It's approved for girls as young as nine. And five million have received it since it was approved two years ago. The FDA and its maker insist it's safe. But CBS News investigative correspondent Sharyl Attkisson has exclusive information on some very serious side effects.

To read the full story New Worries About Gardasil Safety, click here.

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A territorial cat or dog can make a new relationship messy

Every morning, Jill Kessler whispered sweet nothings to her rottweiler, Tor. “I love you; you’re my sweetest boy,” she’d coo to him. One morning, she heard a voice from the other room: “I love you, too, honey,” her husband, Steve, called to her.

To read the full story When your pet hates your partner, click here.

Active ImageDrugmakers Spent Millions Marketing Pills, Some Experts Doubt Validity Of Illness

Two drugmakers spent hundreds of millions of dollars last year to raise awareness of a murky illness, helping boost sales of pills recently approved as treatments and drowning out unresolved questions - including whether it's a real disease at all.

To read the full story Fibromyalgia: Disease Or Marketing Ploy?, click here.

Active ImageIf these nutrition powerhouses are not on your plate, it's time to taste them.

Many Americans have an adventurous spirit, but perhaps not always when it comes to food. Learn which foods are good for your mind and body.

People tend to eat what they know how to prepare, and they may be reluctant to invest in a new food if they're not sure if it tastes good, said Joanne Ikeda, a nutritionist emeritus at the University of California at Berkeley.

To read the full story The 10 Healthiest Foods You've Never Tried, click here.

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 Are the Wrong Kids Getting Vitamins?
Children Who Could Possibly Benefit From Vitamins Aren't The Ones Taking Them


As scientific debate continues over the importance of vitamin supplements, a new study suggests that the children receiving them stand to benefit the least.

To read the full article Are the Wrong Kids Getting Vitamins? , click here.

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Red wine and resveratrol: Good for your heart?

Red wine and something in red wine called resveratrol might be heart healthy. Learn the facts, and hype, regarding red wine and its impact on your heart.

To read the full story Red wine and resveratrol: Good for your heart?, click here.

Active ImageDoes diabetes make the mind go to pieces?

Sweet sugar. That's the Greek translation of the word glucose, the substance our bodies make to use for energy. Glucose and the glucose-regulating hormone insulin have long been studied by scientists looking for a cure for diabetes. Now the substances are increasingly coming under the study of brain scientists because it appears they might just be golden keys to brain health as we age.

To read the full story Does diabetes make the mind go to pieces?, click here.

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Senate Likely to Pass Bill on Kids' Health Insurance
SCHIP Could Cover 11 Million Children


The Senate is expected to approve a bill today that provides health insurance to about 11 million low-income children, paving the way for President Obama to claim an early legislative victory and collect a quick down payment on his campaign pledge to guarantee care to every American child.

To read the full story Senate Likely to Pass Bill on Kids' Health Insurance, click here.

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 Home Repair Raises Lead Levels in Kids
Study Shows Renovations in Older Homes Can Be Source of Lead in Children's Blood


Repair, renovation, and painting of older homes can raise lead in the blood of children living in such environments to dangerous levels, the CDC says.

To read the full story Home Repair Raises Lead Levels in Kids, click here.

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Concussion Damage Follows for Decades

For the 50,000 to 300,000 athletes who sustain concussions in the United States each year, a new study brings bad news about their future mental health. In the first study to look at long-term effects of sports-related concussions, findings show former athletes who sustained concussions more than 30 years ago still suffer problems with memory, attention span and movement.

To read the full story Concussion Damage Follows for Decades, click here.

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More evidence ties preemie birth to autism
Study: Whatever causes developmental disorder may force early delivery


A U.S. study looking at children born more than three months prematurely provided fresh evidence on Thursday linking pre-term birth and autism.

To read the full story More evidence ties preemie birth to autism, click here.

Active ImageCommon Chemicals Linked to Infertility
New Study Reveals Possible Link; Experts Say Findings Still Too Preliminary


In the current issue of Human Reproduction, researchers suggest that chemicals called perfluorinated compounds, or PFCs for short, might be linked to delays in getting pregnant. But study authors and experts in the field caution that the findings are preliminary and mainly highlight an area that needs more research.

To read the full story Common Chemicals Linked to Infertility, click here.

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US abortion debate altered by Obama presidency

The advent of the Obama administration is rousing enthusiasm among abortion-rights supporters and deep anxiety among opponents as both sides mark Thursday's anniversary of Roe v. Wade.

To read the full story  US abortion debate altered by Obama presidency, click here.

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More Americans Skipping Necessary Prescriptions, Survey Finds

One in seven Americans under age 65 went without prescribed medicines in 2007 as drug costs spiraled upward in the United States, a nonprofit research group said on Thursday.

To read the full article More Americans Skipping Necessary Prescriptions, click here.

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Some people may simply be hard-wired to overeat, brain scans show

Weight gain is not always just a matter of lacking willpower, but has more to do with how your brain reacts to what it sees, according to a new study by neuroscientists.

To read the full article Mmm, the food looks good, so I eat it, click here.

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Freaky Fitness: What Working Out Can Do to You
Weird Things Exercise Can Do to Your Body, From Black Toes to Orgasms


When it comes to exercise, you get out what you put in. So, when you devote a lot of work, you expect fabulous results. But, sometimes, the results of a workout are far from what was expected.

To read the full article Freaky Fitness: What Working Out Can Do to You, click here.


Active ImageBetter Air Quality Partly Behind Americans' Longer Life Spans, Study Says

Steps to curb air pollution in the United States are paying off, helping to dramatically increase average life spans, a new study says.


To read the full article Life Expectancy Up, Thanks To Cleaner Air, click here.

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Breast cancer gene-free baby born

The first baby in the UK tested before conception for a genetic form of breast cancer has been born. 

To read the full article Breast cancer gene-free baby born , click here.

Active ImageScientists are investigating if installing a home water softener can relieve children's eczema symptoms.

To read the full article Water softener eczema relief hope, click here.


Active ImagePoor eating habits set in early: study

Parents seem to overestimate the eating habits of their children, say researchers who compared what mothers said to height and weight measurements.

To read the full article Poor eating habits set in early: study , click here.

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When It's Cold Outside, Be Careful Inside With Heaters

Don't let colder temperatures put you at a greater risk of a home heating accident, such as a fire or carbon monoxide poisoning.

To read the full article When It's Cold Outside, Be Careful Inside With Heaters , click here.

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One reason racism may continue to exist is because many people think say one thing and do another, a new study finds.

To read the full article Why Does Racism Persist? , click here.

Active ImageAfter Further Review, Vytorin Gets FDA OK
Regulatory Agency Says Patients Should Not Stop Taking Vytorin Or Other Cholesterol Drugs


The Food and Drug Administration said Thursday patients should not stop taking Vytorin or other cholesterol-lowering drugs, based on its just-completed review of a controversial study that hammered Vytorin sales.

To read the full article After Further Review, Vytorin Gets FDA OK , click here.

Active ImageExperts Say Anti-Dementia Drugs Are Dangerous, Overused

Anti-psychotic drugs commonly used to treat Alzheimer's disease may double a patient's chance of dying within a few years, suggests a new study that adds to concerns already known about such medications.

To read the full article Alzheimer's Drugs Double Death Risk , click here.


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But Those Who Make Pledges Are Less Likely To Use Condoms Or Other Birth Control When They Do Have Sex

Teenagers who take virginity pledges are no less sexually active than other teens, according to a new study.

To read the full story Virginity Pledges Don't Stop Teen Sex, click here.

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Think these 8 foods are healthy? Wrong!
Skip the diet soda and potato chips and have seltzer and popcorn instead


Even if you haven't bought full-fat mayo or sugary soda since blue eye shadow was in style (the first time), you may be getting duped into less-than-stellar food choices at the supermarket. The culprit? The "health halo."

To read the full story Think these 8 foods are healthy? Wrong!, click here.

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From Cleaners to Alarms, How to Start the New Year Off on the Right Foot

As 2009 approaches, many people may be scrambling to make sure that all annual around-the-house undertakings are complete. But there may be a few simple tasks, such as replacing the batteries of a smoke detector or throwing out old food, that get swept under the carpet in the excitement of the final days.

To read the full story 10 Smart Ideas for a Healthy Home , click here.

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People who don’t get much sleep are more likely than those who do to develop calcium deposits in their coronary arteries, possibly raising their risk for heart disease, a new study has found.

To read the full story A Mysterious Link Between Sleeplessness and Heart Disease , click here.

Active ImageExperts Tell Which Germ Concerns Are Legit

As you take steps to avoid the germs and viruses that proliferate as winter progresses, you've no doubt received a good share of advice on how to avoid catching whatever's going around.

To read the full story 10 Germ Myths Under the Microscope, click here.

Active ImageIt's no secret that cold and flu season peaks in winter. And if you're looking for ways to stay well, one priority, say experts, is simple: Follow a wholesome diet, just as you should any time of year. But that can be a tall order during the busy holiday season, when hectic social schedules and family commitments often interfere with regular meals.

To read the full article Good nutrition is always in season, click here.

Active ImageLooking for a simple way to prevent diabetes? Turn off the TV and put on your walking shoes.

To read the full article Turn off the TV to Prevent Diabetes, click here.

Active ImageNonhormonal chemotherapy treatment regimens, including anthracycline-based regimens and taxanes have been shown to improve overall survival in women with metastatic or recurrent inoperable breast cancer over the last 35 years.

To read the full article Breast Cancer Treatment Comparison, click here.

Active ImageSexual Thoughts, Orgasms Are Among the "Unusual Triggers of Sneezing," Doctors Report

Sure, you sneeze when you've got a cold. But some sneezes may happen just by thinking about sex or having an orgasm, British doctors report.

To read the full article Think Sex, Sneeze More? , click here.

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Learn the Latest Treatments and Anxiety Coping Mechanisms

A new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that combining cognitive behavioral therapy and an anti-anxiety medication proved more effective than either treatment alone.

To read the full article As Seen On TV: Anxiety Treatments , click here.

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Pallid parsnips and other colorless veggies may be overlooked but pack plenty of nutrition

Vibrantly colored vegetables often overshadow the paler varieties, which many people view as nutritional lightweights.

To read the full article Winter whites, click here.

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A little wine may boost heart-healthy omega-3s, A daily glass could affect how the body metabolizes fatty acids, study finds

A glass or two of wine per day may increase the amount of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids in a person's blood, a new study suggests.

To read the full article A little wine may boost heart-healthy omega-3s, click here.

Active ImageSurgery in the super old: Success at what price?
Advocates say age alone shouldn't exclude; critics worry about rising costs


At 102, Thelma Vette likes to whiz around her Littleton, Colo., retirement center in an electric wheelchair, bright red and outfitted with a joystick.

To read the full article Surgery in the super old: Success at what price?, click here.

Active ImageNew data: High-fructose corn syrup no worse than sugar

In 2004, three researchers published a paper in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggesting the rise in obesity might be linked to the rise in consumption of high-fructose corn syrup. The paper led to a wave of research and a chorus of popular concern over the cheap, ubiquitous liquid sweetener.

To read the full article High-fructose corn syrup no worse than sugar, click here.

Active ImageStudy Shows Lack Of Brain-Fueling Carbs Could Lead To Poorer Memory

Eliminating carbohydrates from your diet may help you lose weight, but it could leave you fuzzy headed and forgetful, a new study suggests.

To read the full article No-Carb Diets May Impair Memory, click here.

Active ImageStudy Shows Limitations Of Colonoscopies
Procedure's Effectiveness May Depend On Where In The Colon The Cancer Starts, New Research Finds


Colonoscopies have long been considered the gold standard for colorectal cancer screening - 90 percent effective in detecting the second leading cancer killer of men and women in this country.

To read the full article Study Shows Limitations Of Colonoscopies, click here.

Procedure's Effectiveness May Depend On Where In The Colon The Cancer Starts, New Research Finds

Colonoscopies have long been considered the gold standard for colorectal cancer screening - 90 percent effective in detecting the second leading cancer killer of men and women in this country.


To read the full article Study Shows Limitations Of Colonoscopies, click here.

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"Hooking-Up" Becoming More Common Than Traditional Dating, But What Does That Mean?

According to some studies, 75 percent of all college students have "hooked up," though that might not mean what you think it means. Still, whatever happened to good old fashioned dating?

To read the full article The Demise Of Dating, click here.

Active ImageIt's time to ditch that alarm clock, eat for energy and take a walk

In a perfect world, we would never need alarm clocks. Not only would we effortlessly conk out the moment our heads hit the pillow, our eyes would spontaneously open at the same time every day, and we would spring enthusiastically from our beds as chirping bluebirds alighted on our fingertips.

To read the full article A wake-up call for the sleep deprived, click here.

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CBS Evening News: As More Patients Turn To The Internet For A Second Opinion, How Do You Know What's Bogus?

When 45-year-old Melissa Offenhartz was diagnosed with breast cancer last May, she went straight to her computer, CBS News medical correspondent Dr. Jon LaPook reports.

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Controversial Report Says Up To 22 Percent Of Cases May Disappear Without Treatment

A significant portion of invasive breast cancers may regress on their own without treatment, a new study that is bound to provoke controversy suggests.

Active ImageIt's time to ditch that alarm clock, eat for energy and take a walk

In a perfect world, we would never need alarm clocks. Not only would we effortlessly conk out the moment our heads hit the pillow, our eyes would spontaneously open at the same time every day, and we would spring enthusiastically from our beds as chirping bluebirds alighted on our fingertips.

To read the full article A wake-up call for the sleep deprived, click here.


Active ImageNeurotic People Are More Stressed From Facing Uncertainty Than Facing Negative Feedback

Another day, another 400-point market sell-off or dismal jobs report or tax-payer-funded corporate bailout.

It goes without saying that we are living in uncertain times, and how you react to this uncertainty may say a lot about your mental health.

To read the full article Uncertainty Is Powerful Stress Producer , click here.

Active ImageHeart tests offered to many patients with chest pain are of little value in predicting future heart disease, say researchers.

Instead of electrocardiagram (ECG) tests, doctors should spend more time quizzing patients about their symptoms and examining them, they said.

To read the full article Heart test 'cannot predict risk', click here.

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On the Rise in Young People, These Tiny Stones Can Cause Excruciating Pain

Scott Nellis is barely old enough to get a driver's license but the 16-year-old from Lake City, Minn., has already had something most grown-ups have not -- three episodes of kidney stones.

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Study: New Test Flags Gluten Protein Gliadin in Food, Works Faster Than Current Method

Scientists have developed a new test that could speed up identification of gluten, a trigger for people with celiac disease.

Gluten-free foods are already on the market. But gluten can lurk in products that people might not expect. People with celiac disease have to avoid gluten completely, and gluten testing isn't required of U.S. foods.

To read the full article Celiac Disease: Faster Gluten Test, click here.

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Makers touting health benefits, but experts call ad campaign 'troubling'

Sure he takes some ribbing from his brothers. But that doesn't stop Chicago marketing executive Jonathan Schmit from slugging down Pink Lemonade Metamucil twice a day.

"I'm a triathlete. I take all kinds of supplements, so it would be silly not to do this for that part of my health," said Schmit, 36. "I'm like, 'Come on guys. This is a way to get fiber in your diet.' "

To read the full article Laxatives break out of their regular role, click here.

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Concerns about the size of genital organs are often unwarranted.

Most humans are concerned about the size of objects. For many, big is beautiful up to a point after which, it may become ugly. For others, small is beautiful again up to a point after which, it becomes unacceptable. Only a few of us have no views on size.

To read the full article Does size matter?, click here.

Active ImageStudy finds obese kids have arteries like 45-year-olds'

The arteries of many obese children and teenagers are as thick and stiff as those of 45-year-olds, a sign that such children could have severe cardiovascular disease at a much younger age than their parents unless their condition is reversed, researchers said Tuesday.

To read the full article Study finds obese kids have arteries like 45-year-olds, click here.

Active ImageStudy Suggests Many Physicians Prescribe Drugs for Patient Peace of Mind Alone

When you visit the doctor's office with a cold or other minor illness, you may be leaving with a prescription that does more for your peace of mind, than it is going to do for your actual ailment.
Active ImageExperts Explain How to Avoid Influenza

With flu season less than a month away, it isn't too soon to take steps to protect yourself from influenza. Catching the flu can be a setback as it can knock you out of commission for a couple of weeks. Simply watching out for co-workers who have it probably won't be enough, as they can contract the flu and pass it along well before they suffer any outward symptoms.

Active ImageCeramic dishes, art supplies and gardens may contain dangerous doses

While exposure to lead may sound like a somewhat old-fashioned health threat, it is not, in fact it may be more dangerous and more of a problem today than ever before. This may be thanks to sources of lead poisoning that  you might never have expected, such as ceramic dishes, art supplies, and even vegetables grown in city gardens. While the average blood lead levels are way down, new research shows that even low amounts can be harmful, says Ellen Silbergeld, PhD, a professor of environmental health sciences at Johns Hopkins University.

Active ImageShowing Your Heart Some Love!

You probably already know that smoking, being overweight and inactivity can damage your coronary vessels with arteriosclerosis, and that these can also lead to diseases such diabetes and high blood pressure. You probably also know that diabetes and high blood pressure are linked to other dangerous problems. What you may not know is exactly what you can do to protect your heart...


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Should You Tan to Avoid Vitamin D Deficiency?

A number of recent books and studies have touted the benefits of vitamin D and the perils of not getting enough vitamin D, some books and article some encourage lying in the sun and taking vitamin supplements in order to prevent depression. However, many dermatologists that laying out in the sun isn't necessary, they tell their patients that most Americans get all the vitamin D they need just by going outside in the course of their daily duties or activities, and that beyond this it s easy to get adequate levels of the vitamin through nutrients in food. One New York dermatologist tells his patients. "Sunlight helps us produce vitamin D, but the amount of sunlight you need is so low that you could walk outside for probably five minutes and have enough."









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Show your heart some love!

You probably already know that smoking, being overweight and inactivity can damage your coronary vessels with arteriosclerosis, and that these can also lead to diseases such diabetes and high blood pressure. You probably also know that diabetes and high blood pressure are linked to other dangerous problems. What you may not know is exactly what you can do to protect your heart...

Active ImageKeep Your Colon Happy for Better Health

"The colon is not just an organ, it's an entire ecosystem," says Mark Liponis, M.D., author of UltraLongevity: The Seven Step Program for a Younger, Healthier You. “It is infinitesimally folded to produce food-absorbing surface area, the stretched-out gut would resemble a tissue paper large enough to blanket a tennis court. Trillions of bacteria (or "flora") slosh around — some playing nicer than others — and all playing a key role in your digestion, elimination and immunity.”
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Do High-Protein Weight Loss Diets Work?

Are high-protein weight loss diets dangerous?

High-protein diets weight loss diets with carbohydrate restriction are a popular way to lose and control weight. Recently, several clinical studies have looked this approach measuring the human measurements and metabolic effects of this type of diet. The studies focused on the affect of high-protein diets on energy expenditure and how well these high-protein diets controlled hunger. They also looked at how these diets affect weight loss, body composition, cardiovascular (heart) risk, and blood sugar levels, and whether there were any potential damaging consequences to eating a high-protein diet.

Active ImageSense of Smell Important in Animal Mate Selection... but for Humans?

Scientists are still wrestling with the rules of attraction, but the nose, rather than the heart, may be the place to start looking for an answer, suggests one new study.

Active ImageDespite Huge Supply, Too Few Kids & Adults Get Flu Vaccine

More Americans are getting flu shots -- but still far too few, the CDC reports.

Statistics tell us that only one in five babies aged 6 to 23 months are getting both of the flu shots they will need for full protection against getting the severest varieties of flu. Generally, young children are most highly vulnerable to serious complications of the flu and these children should be immunized to protect them for infection with the flu. Immunization against the flu can protecting them, their life and well-being from exposure and complications of the flu.
Active ImagePlasma Vitamin C Level, Fruit and Vegetable Consumption, and the Risk of New-Onset Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Recent research suggests that a greater consumption of fruit and vegetables may decrease your risk of diabetes mellitus. Blood-plasma vitamin C level is a good biomarker of fruit and vegetable intake, but, to our knowledge, no prior studies have examined its association with diabetes risk. This study was designed to determine whether fruit and vegetable intake and plasma vitamin C level are associated with an higher or lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
Active ImageIncorporating Omega-3 in the Food Chain - Why, Where and How?

It has long been recognized that a high fat dietary intake is not conducive to good health. Recently, the fat quality of the diet (sometimes referred to as the fatty acid profile) of your daily meals has also come into question. Over recent years the recommended daily fat intake recommendations have declined in line with its role as proportion of total food energy as calories and in relation to its overall value in our health. Although these recommendations have created significant changes in the types of fats consumed and a fall in the total intake of saturated fats towards the more healthy recommended level, there appears still room for improvement. The proportion of energy derived from saturated fats is still too high in most Western diets.

Active Image5 Rules for Saving Money and Improving Health When Food Shopping

It is no surprise that we are paying more these days at both the gas pump and also at the grocery store. Whether we blame it on rising oil prices, disappointing crop yields, global warming, or a weak dollar the prices are going up and the quality of our food has not improving very much.

The most important question for us however, is what does this means when we are shopping for food. While we may want to save money, we don’t want to be sacrificing nutrition. The rest of this article will deal with a few tips and strategies on saving money on your grocery bill while still maintaining your ability to eat healthfully.

Active ImageWomen More Often Surprised About Sex and Aging

A recent survey suggested that women are more likely to experience age-related sexual symptoms than men and that women are more likely to be surprised by these symptoms.

In June of 2008 Harris Interactive conducted an online survey of some 705 adults, half of which were men and the other half were women. The participants were all between ages 50 and 70. The study was funded by Duramed Pharmaceuticals manufacturer of several birth control and estrogen regalement products.
Active ImageVitamin D and the Risk for Hip Fractures

Osteoporosis is a major problem today. There are many questions regarding what the best treatment for the prevention of osteoporosis and specifically prevention of hip fractures really is.

One approach to prevention of osteoporosis and hip fracture is the use of vitamin D. The question then is does it work and if so, how do you monitor it and know that it has reached the optimal treatment level?  Several studies suggest that vitamin D is definitely helpful in preventing osteoporosis and hip fractures and that the best way to monitor it is to evaluate the serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels and maintain them at an optimal therapeutic level.


If you want healthier and stronger muscles, then you need more than a good workout program.

There is an important connection between muscle mass, strength and good health. Robert Wolfe, the Director of  Translational Research in Aging and Longevity Center at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville says, “As we age, we tend to lose muscle, especially if we are not using it. These losses eventually affect quality of life, our balance, strength and ability to recover from an illness or accident.”

In our society we tend to think  muscles of muscles as things that make us look good if they are big. We rarely thing of the hundreds of ways that our muscles are important to us. In fact they do many things to make our life work for us.  They help us move and they help us digest our food, our heart is also a muscle which not only keeps us alive by pumping blood and oxygen to our body but also pumps nutrients throughout our body. Nancy Rodriguez, a Registered Dietitian and Director of Sports Nutrition Programs at the University of Connecticut in Storrs says,  “Our heart, brain, skin and other organs are in a constant state of remodeling with tissue being built and broken down. Muscles offer a significant supply of amino acids to ensure these vital parts stay strong.” Without blood circulating to our organs our body would start breaking down and become unusable within hours. Healing could not occur, injures could not be repaired and we could not only not move but our heart would stop pumping, and we would stop breathing.

Active and healthy muscles significantly reduce our risk of developing diabetes and osteoporosis, and the more muscle mass we have, the more calories your body can burn.

In order to keep our muscles strong and healthy we need to eat the right kind of foods. We need to eat foods that not only support our muscles in being healthy but also promote them in being healthy. In the next paragraphs we will five groups of foods that are well known for their ability to promote healthier and stronger muscles.

Fish

In this group we are specifically looking for fish that are rich in omega-3 fats, this group includes salmon, tuna, halibut, rainbow trout, and canned sardines. These specific fish are also lean and contain all of the essential amino acids our body needs to make muscles and provide the building materials for creating and repairing other tissues.

Muscles are built based on the amount of protein (amino acids) we consume. Americans typically get more than enough protein to feed their muscles, yet many older adults may not. It has been estimated that one in every three people over the age of 60 lose a significant amount of muscle, this is partly because they don’t get enough protein to prevent the breakdown of their muscle tissues and partly because they stop using their muscles. These two factors can significantly affect their ability to function, to walk, maintain balance, to bend and lift and hence they stiffen up and become sedimentary often ending up having to use a cane to walk, or end in a wheelchair or bed ridden. According to a number of studies the omega-3 fats found in fish may help slow the breakdown of muscle mass in older people. It’s generally recommended that eating at least 2-3 meals of fish high in omega-3 fats per week will help protect muscle degeneration as well as protect your heart.

Sweet potatoes

Sweet potatoes are a terrific source of potassium and antioxidants both of which are helpful, even essential for building muscle mass.

“Anyone who is exercising and working their muscles will be creating free radicals,” says Tara Gidus, a sports dietitian and spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. “Antioxidants can help disarm free radicals and help repair muscle tissue as it breaks down and rebuilds.”

Potassium-rich foods such as sweet potatoes can also help counteract the effects of eating too many acid-producing foods, such as meats, dairy products, and highly-processed items and this is essential as acid-producing foods can speed up the loss of muscle mass.

There are a number of other foods which are high in potassium and antioxidants and can help prevent loss of  muscle mass, these include most lettuces and peppers, also kiwi, melon and oranges. Ideally, you should eat 5-9 servings of vegetables and produce a day with at least3 servings of potassium-rich foods each day.

Low-fat yogurt

Low-fat yogurt is an excellent source of protein, potassium, calcium and vitamin D. All of these nutrients can work together to keep your muscles functioning properly.

Studies suggest that Vitamin D binds to receptors in muscle which then promote growth and strength. Too little vitamin D is linked with muscle weakness.

It can help to select a yogurt brands that are fortified with vitamin D. These can give you as much as  twenty-five percent of your daily requirement of vitamin D in just one serving. If you eat 6-8 ounces of fortified yogurt as day it will help keep your muscles healthy and working more effectively.

Quinoa

Quinoa (keen-wah) is an ancient grain from South America. It is full of good carbohydrates, your body’s preferred source of energy, as well as high-quality protein, potassium and iron.

Carbs are critical to help you pack on muscle. Too few carbs means the proteins in your body will be used for energy, instead of creating new tissue.

While eating protein-rich foods is important for gaining muscle, don’t load up at the expense of wholesome carbohydrates. Quinoa contain all the essential amino acids your body needs for building muscle proteins and other tissues.

Quinoa is also a good source of potassium and contains several minerals including iron, which, is necessary for helping you stay strong.

By enjoying a half-cup of quinoa for breakfast with dried fruits and nuts stirred in, as a side dish mixed with beans and other vegetables, or by adding the mild, light flavor of quinoa to soups, casseroles or salads, you will be doing your self a great favor. Quinoa may also be found in some ready-to-eat cereals and prepared breads, but avoid processed flour products even if they have some quinoa added as processed flours are generally devoid of nutrients and usually high unnecessary calories.

Pumpkin seeds

Pumpkin seeds are loaded with magnesium, manganese, iron and copper.

These minerals work together to build muscle and other essential organ tissues. They are often needed as part of enzymes that streamline bodily functions and support communication between cells. They help maximize muscle mass. Magnesium helps build protein for muscle function. It also helps relax muscles after they’ve contracted. Manganese is needed to form protein and is a component of several enzymes that act as antioxidants which help repair damaged muscle tissue. Iron is good for building endurance.

One ounce of pumpkin seeds (a small handful) contains nearly half the manganese you need in a day.

Summary:

The prevention of  muscle degeneration and the ability to build and repair muscles requires the nutrients we have discussed above. But eating all of these foods and nutrients are not enough if you are a couch potato and do not use your muscles. It helps to exercise a minimum of 15 minutes three times a week or more and to use your muscles as often as is possible. Drinking plenty of water also helps. Doing all of these can slow down muscle wasting, and promote strengthening and enlivening of your muscles. This can keep you from requiring a cane for balance and weakness and ending up in a wheelchair or bed ridden.
Active ImageAngioplasty patients twice as likely to need another procedure, study finds

For heart patients with clogged arteries, the choice between bypass surgery or an angioplasty may come down to one question: How many procedures would you like to have?

To read the full article Bypass May Be Better than Stents Long-term, click here.


Active ImageThese common diseases are often overlooked by doctors

Your doctor has given you the lowdown on how to protect yourself against breast, colon, and lung cancer: Get yearly mammograms (check) and regular colonoscopies (check), and don't smoke (double check).

To read the full article Protect Against Dangers of 3 Quiet Cancers, click here.

Active ImageBut FDA says patients should not stop taking the cholesterol-lowering drug

U.S. government drug safety regulators said Thursday they are investigating whether the cholesterol-lowering drug Vytorin can increase patients' risk of developing cancer.

To read the full article U.S. Probes Possible Vytorin Link to Cancer, click here.
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New Book Called "Why Men Die First" Explains How Men Can Close The Longevity Gap


Listen up, guys. It may be time to drop the bravado and consider these sobering statistics: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is three times higher among men who are clinically depressed. Male suicides outnumber female suicides in every age group.

To read the full article Why Men Die Sooner , click here.

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Dr. Mallika Marshall On What To Keep Around — Just In Case

What if someone in your family suddenly became ill in the middle of the night, and you can't find an open drugstore?

To read the full article Medicine Cabinet Must-Haves, click here.



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Advances in Incurable Cancer Treatment Make Life Worth Living


Jason Connelly has metastatic melanoma. Ellen Rigby has stage-four breast cancer. And Terry Barter has multiple myeloma. Not long ago each of these noncurable cancers would have meant a death sentence. But advances in treatment are not only keeping each patient alive, they are allowing the three to live full lives.

To read the full article Persons of the Week: Cancer Survivors, click here.


Active ImageExperts Tell Where Cold and Flu Viruses and Other Germs Lurk

Many surfaces and objects you come in contact with every day are covered in germs -- but then again, so are you.

"Ninety percent of you is composed of germ cells," said Philip Tierno, director of clinical microbiology and immunology at NYU and author of "The Secret Life of Germs."

To read the full article 10 Germy Surfaces You Touch Every Day, click here.

Active ImageFDA posts its first online list of drugs under investigation for safety problems

The government on Friday began posting a list of prescription drugs under investigation for potential safety problems in an effort to better inform doctors and patients.

To read the full article FDA Posts List of Potential Problem Drugs, click here.

Active ImageEating Disorder Stems From Too Much of a Good Thing

It's no surprise that a lot of Americans watch what they eat. Counting calories, nutrients and fat grams is practically a national pastime.

But what happens when people go over the line, and the pursuit of healthy eating actually becomes unhealthy?

To read the full article Orthorexia: Obsessing Over Health Food, click here.

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Passive Smoking and Breast Cancer in Never Smokers


Background Active smoking has little or no effect on women's risk of developing breast cancer, but it has been suggested that passive exposure to tobacco smoke may increase this risk among women who have never smoked.

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Red Meat Consumption during Adolescence among Premenopausal Women and Risk of Breast Cancer


Adolescence may be a period of increased susceptibility to breast cancer due to regular division of undifferentiated cells that occurs between puberty and first birth. Red meat consumption during early adult life has been associated with breast cancer, but intake during adolescence has not been examined prospectively. We aimed to assess the relationship between red meat intake during adolescence and premenopausal breast cancer.

Active ImageIncorporating Omega-3 in the Food Chain - Why, Where and How?

It has been recognized for decades that high fat intakes are not conducive to good health and, more recently, that the fatty acid profile of the diet (sometimes referred to as fat quality) is also important. Fat intake as a proportion of total food energy has declined over recent years in line with recommendations. Although there have been changes in the types of fats consumed and a fall in the total intake of saturated fats towards the recommended level, there is still room for improvement. The proportion of energy derived from saturated fats is still too high in most Western diets.
Active ImageUntil she was 11 months old, Aleanie Remy-Marquez could have starred in an advertisement for breast milk. She took to nursing easily, was breast-fed exclusively for six or seven months, and ate little else even after that.

To read the full article Vitamin D Deficiency May Lurk in Babies, click here.
Active ImageVitamin D is important not only for preventing steroid-induced osteoporosis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) but also for reducing RA disease activity and risk of falls.

To read the full article Experts Urge More Attention to Vitamin D in Rheumatoid Arthritis, click here.
Active ImageAlzheimer's disease is a brain disorder that affects a person's ability to carry out daily activities. This disorder is becoming an increasing problem in the United States as the population ages.

To read the full article At-Home Test for Alzheimer’s Disease, click here.
Active ImagePractical eccentric and concentric exercises to heal the pain

Lateral epicondylitis, commonly referred to as tennis elbow, affects 1% to 3% of the population.1 It is thought to be an overuse injury, originating in the wrist extensor muscles, rather than an inflammatory problem. It is brought on by occupational activities and sports that involve a repetitive wrist motion or a power grip.

To read the full article Tennis elbow no more, click here.
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A Population-based Study of Prevalence of Complementary Methods Use by Cancer Survivors


A report from the American Cancer Society's studies of Complementary Methods in cancer survivors by Ted Gansler, MD, Chiewkwei Kaw, Corinne Crammer, Tenbroeck Smith, for Health Promotions, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgiav

Active ImageUse it or lose it: Yes, it's true

Urology clinics have a saying: "Erections make erections." In other words, sex is not unlike sports. If you want to be a good tennis player, play lots of tennis; if you want to be a good lover, make lots of love.

To read the full article Use it or lose it: Yes, it's true, click here.


Active ImageMedical marijuana: What does science say?

Depending on whom you ask, marijuana is a dangerous drug that should be kept illegal alongside heroin and PCP, or it's a miracle herb with a trove of medical benefits that the government is seeking to deny the public -- or something in between: a plant with medical uses and drawbacks, worth exploring.

To read the full article Medical marijuana: What does science say?, click here.

 

Active ImageTrace amounts of bisphenol A won't harm adults or infants, review finds

Despite ongoing safety concerns from parents, consumer groups and politicians, a chemical used in baby bottles, canned food and other items is not dangerous, federal regulators said Friday.

To read the full article FDA: Chemical found in plastic bottles is safe, click here.

Active ImageHow to banish dullness, age spots, fine lines and wrinkles

Think birthdays are all that shout your age to the world? Unfortunately, your skin can make you look older than you are.

To read the full article Keep your skin looking forever young, click here.


Here is another recent article on the same subject preserving your skin. What you need to know to save your skin, clcik here.


Active ImageProper Exercise And Diet Are Among Key Factors In Stroke Prevention

A new study shows that five healthy lifestyle factors help cut the risk of the most common type of stroke by 80%.

The study, reported in the journal Circulation, tracked 43,685 men and 71,243 women. The average age at the start of the study was 54 for men and 50 for women.

To read the full article 5 Lifestyle Habits That Cut Stroke Risk, click here.

Active ImageHey Big Spender, It Isn't You - And It's Not The Bargain Maven Or Penny Pincher, Either

Your shopping style may be a window on your happiness -- and what you spend on may matter more than how much you shell out.

It turns out that the happiest shoppers aren't those who bag the biggest bargains, or those who spend whatever it takes to get the best items out there, or people whose wallets are gathering dust while they pinch their pennies.

To read the full article Which Shoppers Are Happiest?, click here.


Active ImageStudies: 4 Commonly Used Moisturizing Creams Promote Tumors In UV-Exposed Mice

Our commonly used moisturizers promoted skin cancers in mouse studies.

Mice are not men. But the unexpected finding suggests that these -- and perhaps other products -- may not be as safe as they're thought to be.

To read the full article Moisturizers Linked To Skin Cancer?, click here.

Active ImageStudy Shows Older Runners Have Fewer Disabilities Than Non-Runners

Regular running slows the effects of aging, according to a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine that tracked 500 older runners for more than 20 years.

To read the full story Running Slows the Effects of Aging, click here.

Active ImageInvestigators have begun two large studies of stretching, asking about its effectiveness in much the way scientists might ask about a new drug or medical device. They’re actively recruiting thousands of volunteers to participate, in the United States and elsewhere, and randomly assigning participants to use the method, or not. That is the only way, researchers say, to detect the subtle effects that most treatments and exercise interventions might be expected to evoke.

To read the full story Is Stretching All It’s Cracked Up to Be?, click here.

Active ImageTuna and Bean Salad

They lurk in every pantry: cans of beans bought long ago for a forgotten meal, now dusty and unloved on a back shelf.

To read the full story Recipes for Health, click here.

Active ImageExpert: Good Time To Take Step Back, Check Your Skin For Damage From Sun

It's the middle of summer, and perhaps you haven't been careful about avoiding the sun so far this season.

We all have to walk outside in the sunshine, some of us play sports outside, and others just lie in the sun at the beach.

To read the full story Mid-Summer Skin Cancer Alert, click here.

Active ImageBisphenol, Which Can Disrupt Hormonal System, Is Used In Plastic Bottles And Formula Cans

Responding to growing consumer anxiety, California lawmakers are considering enacting what could be the first statewide restrictions on a chemical found in plastic baby bottles and infant formula cans.

To read the full story Calif. Weighs Chemical Ban In Baby Items , click here.

Active ImageStudy Shows Lack of Energy Could Signal Health Problems Beyond Just Normal Aging Process

A study done by researchers at Columbia University urges physicians to take complaints of exhaustion among the elderly seriously.

There were 2,130 people in the study, which took place from 1989 to 1995. The average age was 74, and 20% of the participants were older than 80. The majority were women.


To read the full story Fatigue Among Elders Tied to Other Ills , click here.

Active ImageBrown Recluse Spider Makes Venomous Presence Known
Reports of Poisonous Spider Bite on the Rise, Experts Say


A 4-inch scar stretches across 6-year-old Barron Bowling's face, a road map to the venom that seeped through his cheek when he was bitten by a brown recluse spider last September.

To read the full story Brown Recluse Spider Makes Venomous Presence Known, click here.

Active ImageMemo based on early, unpublished data; other studies show no danger

The head of a prominent cancer research institute issued an unprecedented warning to his faculty and staff Wednesday: Limit cell phone use because of the possible risk of cancer.

To read the full story Cancer center director warns of cell phone risks, click here.

Active ImageProstate cancer therapy tied to cognitive decline

Study: Men on hormone therapy had trouble concentrating, multi-tasking

Up to 69 percent of men who receive hormone deprivation therapy for prostate cancer will experience some degree of cognitive impairment, such as in the ability to concentrate, a review of published data suggests.

To read the full story Prostate cancer therapy tied to cognitive decline, click here.

Active ImageRegimen is just as effective as statins, new research suggests

A regimen of supplements and lifestyle coaching is just as effective as statin medication for reducing levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or "bad" cholesterol, and more effective in helping people lose weight, new research shows.

To read the full story Red yeast rice, fish oil fight high cholesterol, click here.

Active Image 10 Healthy Aging Tips From Centenarians

 Relationships, An Active Mind, Humor Make The List In Centenarian Poll

Staying close to family and friends, keeping your mind active, and having a sense of humor are keys to healthy aging, centenarians say in a new poll.

To read the full story 10 Healthy Aging Tips From Centenarians, click here.

Active ImageExperimental Alzheimer's Drug Shows Early Promise

Experimental drug halts Alzheimer's progression in midstage study; 'fantastic' one expert says

For the first time, an experimental drug shows promise for halting the progression of Alzheimer's disease by taking a very new approach: breaking up the protein tangles that clog victims' brains.

To read the full story Experimental Alzheimer's Drug Shows Early Promise, click here.

Active Image'Red Flags': 10 Symptoms You Shouldn't Ignore
For Some Symptoms, Best Bet Is to See Doctor Immediately


"Time is brain." The phrase is repeated like a mantra in the halls and classrooms of medical schools and hospitals throughout the country. The reminder to young trainees is that time is of the essence; the faster a diagnosis is made and treatment initiated, the less damage will have occurred.

To read the full story 'Red Flags': 10 Symptoms You Shouldn't Ignore, click here.

Lowering Fats in Your Diet



There are at least four great reasons to eat less fat:

  1. It can assist you in losing weight or maintaining your present weight because you will be eating fewer unnecessary calories.
  2. It can help reduce your risk of heart disease by reducing saturated fat. This will help lower blood cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of atherosclerosis and heart attack or stroke..
  3. It can help you reduce your risk of cancer.
  4. Eating fewer high-fat foods means more room for fruits, vegetables, grains, and beans which means overall better health and well-being.



Reducing Fat In Your Diet

 

Here are a few suggestions to help get you started in reducing fat from your diet. These same suggestion can also help you to keep fat out of your diet in the future. Try one or two of these suggestions immediately and as you are successful increase until you have all of them covered.

  1. Eat smaller portions of lean meat, fish, and poultry.
  2. Cut off all visible fat before cooking.
  3. Use low-fat cooking methods: baking, poaching, broiling, BBQ, or use a George Foreman Grill.
  4. Remove skin from poultry.
  5. Eat less processed meats and when you do eat processed meats, purchase only low-fat luncheon meats, such as sliced turkey or chicken breast, lean ham, lean sliced beef.
  6. Use reduced-fat or nonfat salad dressings or use no dressing at all.
  7. If you must use a salad dressing consider using Balsamic vinegar, lemon alone, salt and pepper or salad seasoning. If you must use an oil-based dressing, use olive or canola oil only.   
  8. Use a little lemon juice, dried herbs, thinly sliced green onions, or a little salsa as a non-fat topping for vegetables or salads.
  9. Use non-fat or lower fat spreads, such as jelly or jam, fruit spread, apple butter, non-fat or reduced-calorie mayonnaise, non-fat margarine, or mustard.
  10. Use high-fat foods as little as possible, choose more low-fat and non-fat foods.
  11. Top your baked potatoes with plain non-fat or low-fat yogurt, non-fat or reduced-fat sour cream, non-fat or low-fat cottage cheese, non-fat margarine, non-fat hard cheese, salsa or vinegar or eat it dry.
  12. When absolutely necessary, use only small amounts of high-fat toppings, for example, use only 1 tsp butter or mayonnaise, or 1 tbsp sour cream, or 1 tbsp regular salad dressing.
  13. Switch to 1 percent or skim milk and other non-fat or lower fat dairy products (low-fat or non-fat yogurt, non-fat or reduced-fat sour cream).
  14. Cut back on cheese as much as possible. If you must have cheese then use only small amounts (1 oz or less) on sandwiches and in cooking or use lower fat and fat-free cheeses (part-skim mozzarella, 1 percent cottage cheese, or non-fat hard cheese).
  15. Try small amounts of these low-fat treats: fig bars, vanilla wafers, ginger snaps, angel food cake, jelly beans, gum drops, hard candy, puddings made with low-fat (1 percent) skim milk, non-fat frozen yogurt with a fruit topping, or fruit popsicles. Try pretzels or popcorn without butter or oil for an unsweetened treat.
  16. Better still eat more fruits and vegetables, they are healthy and can lower your risk of heart disease and stroke.
  17. Eliminate french fries and other fried foods as much as possible. If you have to have them limit them only to special occasions and have small servings.
  18. Save high-fat desserts (ice cream, pastries) for special occasions; have small amounts; share a serving with a friend.

 

 
Which are the leanest cuts of meat available to lower fat in my diet? 

 

What Is Celiac Disease? 

 

Celiac disease is an allergy disease affecting the digestive system. It causes damage to the elements of small intestine and interferes with absorption of nutrients from food. People with celiac disease cannot tolerate a protein called gluten. Gluten is mainly found in foods especially in wheat, rye and barley. Gluten however, may also be found in some products we use every day and even some medicines.

When people with celiac disease eat foods or use products containing gluten, their immune system responds by damaging the small intestine. Tiny, finger-like protrusions lining the small intestine called villi are damaged or destroyed. Villi normally allow the predigested nutrients from food to be absorbed from the intestine into the bloodstream. Without healthy villi, a person can become malnourished regardless of the quantity or the quality of the food they eat.

Because our own body's own immune system causes damage to our villi celiac disease is considered an autoimmune disorder. It is also classified as a disease of malabsorption because of the injury to the villi nutrients are not absorbed. Celiac disease is also known by a few other names: celiac sprue, nontropical sprue, and gluten-sensitive enteropathy. These are descriptive names which have been given to this condition over the years. Currently the favored name is simply Celiac disease.

Since Celiac disease is a genetic disease, it often passes from one member of a in family to another. Celiac disease may lie dormant until it is triggered or activated by having surgery, pregnancy, childbirth, viral infection, or severe emotional stress. It occurs more frequently in women but also occurs in men. It can occur as early 6 to 24 months of age after the introduction of weaning foods however, the majority of people who become symptomatic will do so during late childhood or adulthood.  One in every100 whites of Northern European ancestry are at risk, Yet only 10% of these people will during their life be diagnoses with celiac disease. This suggests that most people with Celiac disease either remain undiagnosed or are asymptomatic.


Symptoms of Celiac disease may include one or more of the following symptoms:

•    Recurrent problem with excessive gas
•    Recurring abdominal bloating and pain
•    Chronic diarrhea
•    Pale, foul-smelling, or fatty stool
•    Weight loss / weight gain
•    Fatigue
•    Unexplained anemia (a low count of red blood cells causing fatigue)
•    Bone or joint pain
•    Osteoporosis, osteopenia
•    Behavioral changes
•    Tingling numbness in the legs (from nerve damage)
•    Muscle cramps
•    Seizures
•    Missed menstrual periods (often because of excessive weight loss)
•    Infertility, recurrent miscarriage
•    Delayed growth
•    Failure to thrive in infants
•    Pale sores inside the mouth, called aphthous ulcers
•    Tooth discoloration or loss of enamel
•    Itchy skin rash called dermatitis herpetiformis


Does Everyone Have These Symptoms?


No! Many persons with celiac disease may have no symptoms. People without symptoms are still at risk for the complications of Celiac disease, including malnutrition. The longer a person goes undiagnosed and untreated, the greater the chance of developing malnutrition and other complications. The body is just not getting enough nutrients. Malnutrition is a serious problem for children because they need adequate nutrition to develop properly. Anemia, delayed growth, and weight loss may be indications of malnutrition.


Celiac Symptoms May Vary From Person To Person?


Celiac disease clearly seems to affect people differently. Some people develop symptoms as children, others as adults. Some people with Celiac disease may have no symptoms at all or may be unaware of their symptoms. In many people the undamaged part of their small intestine may keep them will, while other may not be able to absorb enough nutrients to prevent symptoms.

The length of time a person is breast-fed, the age a person started eating gluten-containing foods, and the amount of gluten containing foods one eats are three factors that are thought to play an important role in when and how sever Celiac symptoms may be when they do appear. The longer a person was breast-fed, the later the symptoms of Celiac disease will likely appear and the less severe their symptoms.


How Is Celiac Disease Diagnosed?

Recognizing Celiac disease can be difficult because some of its symptoms are similar to those of other diseases. In fact, sometimes Celiac disease is confused with irritable bowel syndrome, iron-deficiency anemia caused by menstrual blood loss, Crohn's disease, diverticulitis, intestinal infections, and chronic fatigue syndrome. As a result, celiac disease is commonly under diagnosed or misdiagnosed.

In order to make the diagnosis, if symptoms suggest it, certain autoantibodies are tested. Antibodies are protective proteins produced by the immune system in response to substances that the body perceives to be threatening. Autoantibodies are proteins that react against the body's own molecules or tissues. Abnormal levels of Immunoglobulin A (IgA), anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTGA) or IgA anti-endomysium antibodies (AEA) can help your doctor rule in or rule out Celiac disease. A referral to a GI specialist may be helpful.


What Is the Treatment?

The only treatment for Celiac disease is to follow a gluten-free diet. For most people, following this diet will stop symptoms, heal existing intestinal damage, and prevent further damage. Improvements begin within days of starting the diet. The small intestine is usually completely healed in 3 to 6 months in children and younger adults and within 2 years for older adults. Completely healed means a person now has villi that can absorb nutrients from food into the bloodstream.

In order to stay well, people with Celiac disease must avoid gluten for the rest of their lives. Eating any gluten, no matter how small an amount, can damage the small intestine. The damage will occur in anyone with the disease, including people without noticeable symptoms. Some people will not improve and may even get worse in spite of watching what they eat. In such situations a specialist should be consulted.

To learn more about a Gluten Free Diet, click here. 

 

Active ImageRestaurants Offering Gluten-Free Options

When Barbara Bonavoglia, 65, learned about four and a half years ago that she and her daughter, Lisa Mackie, 33, had celiac disease, she realized they would never eat regular pasta again. It was not an easy adjustment for Ms. Bonavoglia, who grew up on her family’s Italian-American fare.

To read the full article Restaurants Offering Gluten-Free Options , click here.

Active ImageHow to Treat the 5 Most Common Headaches

Health.com shares a cheat sheet to identifying and treating your pain

It's critical to identify which type of headache you suffer from so that the correct treatment can be prescribed. In one 2004 study, 80 percent of patients with a recent history of self-described or doctor-diagnosed sinus headache — but none of the signs of sinus infection — actually met the criteria for migraine. And two-thirds of those patients expressed dissatisfaction with the medications they were using to treat their headaches. Health.com has a cheat sheet to help you put a name to your pain and how to treat it.

To read the full article How to Treat the 5 Most Common Headaches, click here.

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The Healthiest Time to Toss it

From pills and pillows to mattresses and shampoo, here's a reality check on when to replace 14 common household items.

To read the full article The Healthiest Time to Toss it , click here.



Active ImageStroke Risk Higher In Women Who Sleep More Than 9 Hours Or Less Than 6 Hours Per Night

Getting too much sleep may be a more serious sign of stroke risk among older women than not getting enough sleep, according to a new study.

To read the full article Older Women's Stroke Risk Linked To Sleep, click here.

Active ImageStudy Shows Removal Of Ovaries During Hysterectomy Is Risky, Often Unnecessary

There is not enough evidence to justify the routine removal of the ovaries during hysterectomy - a common practice that may convey as many risks as benefits for premenopausal women, a new analysis suggests.

To read the full article Weighing Risks Of Removing Ovaries, click here.

Active ImageDr. Mallika Marshall Offers Tips Beyond The Obvious "Eat Less And Exercise More"

Eating less and exercising more - but still having trouble shedding those excess pounds?

To read the full article Surprising Secrets Of Slimming Down, click here.

Active ImageThere are statin alternatives -- but check with a doctor first

Few things annoy a doctor as much as a patient making a decision to stop a medication without consulting the physician. That's just what happened, repeatedly, to Dr. David Becker, cardiologist at the University of Pennsylvania Health System. "I saw dozens of people in my practice. I'd run the cholesterol panels, and I'd say, 'Good job. You're staying on the Lipitor or Zocor,' " he says. But it turns out their good results weren't because of the cholesterol-lowering statins he had prescribed.

To read the full article There are statin alternatives -- but check with a doctor first, click here.

Active ImageLowering cholesterol in kids starts with diet, exercise


But according to guidelines recently released by the American Academy of Pediatrics, statins may be needed to prevent harmful plaque buildup.

At first blush, the new guidelines on cholesterol control in children were shocking. Statins, one of the most frequently prescribed drugs for adults worldwide, could be prescribed for some children as young as 8, according to recommendations released last week by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

To read the full article Lowering cholesterol in kids starts with diet, exercise, click here.

Active ImageStudy: As Gas Prices Go up, Auto Deaths Drop

Researchers say today's high gas prices could cut auto deaths by a third as driving decreases
lifesaver for teens.

High gas prices could turn out to be a some drivers. The authors of a new study say gas prices are causing driving declines that could result in a third fewer auto deaths annually, with the most dramatic drop likely to be among teen drivers.

To read the full article As Gas Prices Go up, Auto Deaths Drop, click here.

Active ImageFDA, Pfizer Told of Chantix Safety Concerns a Year Ago

A physician and top smoking cessation researcher says U.S. regulators and a drugmaker brushed aside his concerns a year ago about possibly dangerous side effects from longer-term use of the stop-smoking drug Chantix.

To read the full article Chantix Safety Concerns, click here.

Active ImageLosing an Old Friend: Goodbye to Ciprofloxacin?

New Warning on Popular Antibiotic Affecting Patient Decisions

As you may have read, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Thursday that it will require manufacturers of fluoroquinolone antibiotics — the group that includes ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, among others — to add a black box warning on the product label cautioning doctors and patients about the risk of tendon rupture with these agents.

To read the full article Goodbye to Ciprofloxacin? , click here.

 

Active ImageAre you gonna eat that? How to curb food waste

We throw away about 14 percent of the grub we buy, studies suggest. Amidst growing concerns about rising food prices and global warming, many Americans are taking a closer look at what they do — and don’t — eat.

To read the full article Are you gonna eat that? How to curb food waste, click here.

Active ImageMoney May Give People The Incentive To Work Harder, But Their Personal Relationships May Suffer

Money may make the world go round, as the song goes, by encouraging the type of hard work and resourcefulness that leads to economic success. But money might also put a strain on personal relationships, a new study shows.


To read the full article Study: Money Affects Human Interaction, click here.

Active ImageWhat I Wish I’d Done Differently

Looking back on the last few years of my mother’s life, with 20/20 hindsight and the belated knowledge that came from four years of reporting about aging for The New York Times, my single biggest mistake was not finding a doctor with expertise in geriatrics to quarterback her care and attend to the quality of her life, not merely its length.

To read the full article What I Wish I’d Done Differently, click here.

Active ImageYou are What Your Mom Eats

What you eat during pregnancy may determine if your child stays disease-free, recent research suggests.

To read the full article You are What Your Mom Eats, click here.

Active ImageKids playing outside in summer sure can work up quite an appetite.

And what better way to satisfy it between meals than with snacks that are not only healthy, but that you and they can enjoy creating -- and having -- together?!

To read the full article Healthy, Fun Summer Snacks For Kids, click here.

Active ImageStudy Fuels Debate Over The Best Vaccination Strategy

Teenage girls who are sexually active and those who are not eventually all have the same risk for infection with the human papilloma virus (HPV), new research suggests.

To read the full article Early Sex Doesn't Predict HPV Infection, click here.

Active ImageTiny grins light up reward centers that lead to quality care, study says

Any mother who's ever felt a jolt of joy at her baby’s first grin knows how intoxicating that can be.

Now, scientists at the Baylor College of Medicine say there’s more to the baby buzz than just a rush of happy feelings. Turns out that seeing your own child smile actually activates the pleasure receptors in the brain typically associated with food, sex  — and drug addiction.

To read the full article Baby's first smiles give mom's brain a buzz, click here.
Active ImageMore Than Three in Four Patients Don't Understand What They're Told in the ER

More than three in four emergency room patients do not fully understand the instructions that doctors give them after their visits, new research suggests.

To read the full article ER Patients Don't Understand Doc's Orders, click here.

Active ImageMen's Fertility Plummets in Late 30s, Early 40s

A new study shows that a man's fertility starts to fall in his mid 30s, providing more evidence that like women, men, too, have a kind of biological clock that can play a big role in a women's chances of getting pregnant.

To read the full article Biological Clocks Tick for Men Too, click here.

Active ImageArteries are blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients from your heart to the rest of your body. Healthy arteries are flexible, strong and elastic. Over time, however, too much pressure in your arteries can make the walls thick and stiff — sometimes restricting blood flow to your organs and tissues. This process is called arteriosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries.

To read the full story Arteriosclerosis and Atherosclerosis, click here.
Active ImageStudy Shows Portable Device Can Zap Migraine

A lightweight, handheld device helps migraine sufferers zap away pain, sometimes within two hours, according to a new study.

Called a transcranial magnetic stimulation device (TMS), it transmits magnetic pulses that interrupt the "hyper-excitability" of neurons in the brain, which some experts believe is to blame for launching the migraine.

To read the full story Magnetic Pulses May 'Zap' Migraine Pain, click here.
Active ImageMore and more doctors believe that health insurance companies are taking medical decisions out of their hands by dictating the medications a doctor can prescribe to patients.

To read the full story Doctors complain about increasing reliance on generics, click here.
Active ImageFor older adults, motivation to stay active comes in many forms

Age is no excuse for inactivity — and neither are heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, bad knees or strokes, say folks over age 65 who responded to my recent column (Your Health, June 16) on lack of exercise among most older adults.


To read the full story For older adults, motivation to stay active comes in many forms, click here.
Active ImageAt 5 months old, Marty Lesner isn't quite ready for aerobics.

But his mom has led him through a daily workout since he was 2 weeks old.


To read the full story For strong babies, make playtime 'tummy time', click here.
Active ImageDr. Mallika Marshall Looks At Fast-Growing Health Problem In U.S. And Abroad

The incidence of asthma is on the rise, both in the United States and elsewhere - and at an alarming rate.

More than 20 million adults and children have it, federal statistics show.

To read the full story Spotting And Treating Asthma, click here.

Active ImageWake up and smell the coffee – it could reduce the stress that comes from not getting enough sleep.

New research shows you don’t have to drink coffee to feel its effects – just smelling it can jump-start genes in the brain. When they experimented on lab rats, an international group of scientists found inhaling the aroma of coffee changes the activity of genes in the brain in a way that helps reduce the stress of sleep deprivation.

To read the full article Coffee Aroma Reduces Stress, click here.
Active ImageA woman’s diet during pregnancy could have an impact on when her child goes through puberty.
 
A new report from New Zealand finds a high fat diet during pregnancy and while a woman is nursing may cause early puberty in her children. That could lead to obesity when they get older.

To read the full article Woman’s Diet Linked to Child’s Puberty, click here.
Active ImageEmergency Contraception: If Women Don't Ask, Doctors Don't Tell

Despite widespread misinformation about emergency contraception
Active ImageStudy Shows Family Relationships Bring Greater Happiness Than High Income

Money might buy happiness for some, but for most people having strong family ties is a much bigger predictor of contentment than income, a new study shows.

When researchers analyzed data tracking married people over a decade, they found that while income did contribute to happiness up to a point, the quality of family relationships was much more important.

To read the full article For Happiness, Seek Family, Not Fortune, click here.

Active ImageNew Report Suggests Sunshine Vitamin May Have Significant Cancer Benefits

When Joanna Fuchs was diagnosed with colon cancer last year, a blood test revealed she was severely deficient in vitamin D. "I was obviously very concerned and very worried," Fuchs said.

To read the full article Vitamin D May Help Patients Survive Cancer, click here.

Active Image10 Surprising -- and Easy -- Ways to Trim Costs on Everything From Your Yearly Physical to Specialized Surgery

After a car accident left Michelle Katz, a Washington, D.C., nursing student, with persistent back pain and numbness in 1998, she consulted a neurosurgeon, who told her she'd need an operation to repair her slipped disk. Katz, then 26, didn't have health insurance, so she did the only thing she could think of: She negotiated.

To read the full article Save Thousands On Your Health Care, click here.

Active ImageNew Research Points to Biological Reason Why Girls Like Bad Boys

Ricky Menezes, a 22-year-old from Marlborough, Mass., says he knows he will hook up with "about 20 girls" in the next month. How does he know this, you ask? Ricky knows this because he's what we call a "bad boy" -- the type of guy who knows exactly how to act, what to say and how to manipulate women into giving him what he wants.

To read the full article Why Nice Guys Finish Last, click here.

Active ImageStudy: Hypoglycemia raises diabetics' heart risk

A recent event of hypoglycemia, or extremely low blood sugar, in type 2 diabetics was a major predictor of heart attack, stroke and death, a just-finished study by the Department of Veterans Affairs found.

To read the full story Study: Hypoglycemia raises diabetics' heart risk, click here.

Active ImageCan Some Do More Harm Than Good? How Much Is Too Much To Take?

 It seems as if there's a vitamin or supplement on the market to protect against every ill.

Some people swear by them, feeling supplements make them stronger and keep them healthier.

To read the full story Doubts Cast On Vitamin Supplements, click here.

Active ImageA Medical Miracle Saves Baby's Life From Life-Threatening Tumor

At four weeks old, Macie McCartney has already had two birthdays.

That's remarkable, considering there was a time her parents feared she'd never see even one, CBS News correspondent Kelly Cobiella reports.

To read the full story The Girl Who Was "Born" Twice, click here.



Active ImageFrom Hiccups To An Overactive Bladder, Experts Offer Advice For Managing Your Body's

As anyone who's ever had an embarrassing personal moment can tell you - sometimes your body just has a mind of its own.

From expelling gas, a case of the hiccups, an overactive bladder, and a belch you just can't swallow, to ill-timed yawns, cotton mouth, excessive sweating ... well, you get it. Any and all can easily occur just at the times when you want to look (and feel) your best.

To read the full story How To Handle Embarrassing Body Problems, click here.

Active ImageSteps You Can Take to Limit Brittle Bones

I don't think there is anything more feared among the elderly than becoming totally dependent on others for help and perhaps being sent to a nursing home because they aren't able to care for themselves.

To read the full story Healthy Dose: The Fear of Osteoporosis, click here.

Active ImageRed Yeast Rice Extract May Hold Heart Benefits; Not All Doctors Enthused

When 61-year-old Mark Aloe learned that he had high cholesterol and a family history of heart disease nearly 20 years ago, he immediately set out on the standard course of ,  for heart patients with high cholesterol: He began taking a prescription statin.

To read the full story Chinese Supplement May Cut Heart Risk, click here.

Active ImageCome down with some kind of aesthetic malaise — a dark patch or a receding hairline — and invariably someone will profess to have the magic cure. So it is with stretch marks, the road map of pregnancy, the telltale signs carved into about 90 percent of pregnant women’s abdomens, derrieres, breasts and thighs. Market research firms like the NPD Group, Information Resources and Mintel don’t track the size of the skin-care market for pregnant women.
Active ImageNSAIDs and Alzheimer’s: They All Reduce the Risk

Many doctors believe ibuprofen is better than other NSAID pain relievers at reducing a person’s risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease. But a new study challenges that assumption.

To read the full article NSAIDs and Alzheimer’s: They All Reduce the Risk, click here.
Active ImageCompounds In Cocoa Could Help Ward Off Heart Complications, Study Shows

A cup of hot cocoa may seem like a no-no for people with diabetes, but the beverage may actually serve up a healthy dose of prevention and ward off heart disease, the leading cause of diabetes-related death.

To read the full article Cocoa For Diabetes?, click here.

Active ImageSports Medicine Expert Looks At Biking, Running, Tennis, And Camp

Summer is the ideal time to have plenty of outdoor fun -- but you need to be smart about recreational sports to avoid injury.

There are, says Columbia University orthopedic surgeon and sports injury specialist Dr. Christopher Ahmad, right and wrong ways to go about things when biking, running, playing tennis, and at summer camp. There are, he says, easy ways to prevent serious problems.

To read the full article Have Summer Fun Without Getting Hurt, click here.

Active ImageJust Because the Label Says It's Good for You Doesn't Mean It Is. How to Read Beyond the Marketing Hype

Take a moment and consider this logic: 1. Fat-free foods are healthy. 2. Skittles are fat-free. 3. Therefore, Skittles are healthy. Make sense? Of course not. But it's exactly the type of reasoning that food manufacturers want you to use.

To read the full article You Call That Health Food?, click here.

Active ImagePsychologist Says You Can Train Your Brain to Stop Experiencing Nightmares

Everyone has nightmares -- everyone, that is, except Ross Levin. "I actually have very few nightmares," he said.

Maybe that's because Levin is a psychologist who spends most of his time studying terrifying dreams. He says he's figured out what seems to be a shockingly simple method for fighting chronic nightmares, the kind that haunt Rachel Smalls.

To read the full article Learning to Fight Chronic Nightmares, click here.

Active ImageMarisol Quiroz watched in alarm as her overweight son ballooned 50 pounds in a year. She had taken him to doctors and nutritionists who told her to make him stop eating so much but never told her how.

To read the full article The Search for Solutions, click here.


Active ImageFor years, smokers have been exhorted to take the initiative and quit: use a nicotine patch, chew nicotine gum, take a prescription medication that can help, call a help line, just say no. But a new study finds that stopping is seldom an individual decision.

To read the full article Study Finds Big Social Factor in Quitting Smoking, click here.

Active ImageTime is of the essence -- at least for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). According to a new study, the sooner someone with COPD starts getting rehabilitation, the more they
Active ImageHerpes zoster, commonly known as shingles, occurs when varicella zoster, the virus that causes chickenpox, affects the spinal nerves and causes nerve pain. The condition is expensive to treat and risk factors include depression, suppressed immunity, older age and other illnesses. Recently, genetic risk factors have also been suggested for shingles.

To read the full article Shingles: In Your Blood?, click here.

Active ImageMany Patients Find Hope in Clinical Trials Offering Experimental Treatments

Three weeks ago, 38-year-old Allan Shallenberger from Los Angeles received the same grim diagnosis as Sen. Ted Kennedy: he had the same type of brain tumor that cannot be surgically removed.

"Put up the fight of your life, and if it doesn't work out, hey, well at least you put up the fight," Shallenberger said, describing his predicament.

To read the full article Terminal Cancer Patients Can Still Put Up a Fight, click here. 
Active ImageStudy: Oral sex not commonplace among those who avoid intercourse

Contrary to widespread belief, teenagers do not appear to commonly engage in oral sex as a way to preserve their virginity, according to the first study to examine the question nationally.

The analysis of a federal survey of more than 2,200 males and females aged 15 to 19, released yesterday, found that more than half reported having had oral sex. But those who described themselves as virgins were far less likely to say they had tried it than those who had had intercourse.

To read the full story A debunking on teens and 'technical virginity', click here.

Active ImageIn diabetics, impotence may double cardiac risks, new studies say

Men with diabetes already know that erectile dysfunction can be a distressing side effect of the illness, adding insult to injury for about 80 percent of those who have the disease.

But sexual symptoms may also signal problems that go beyond impaired intimacy, according to new research that shows diabetic men who struggle with impotence face twice the risk for potentially deadly heart problems.  

To read the full story Erectile dysfunction warns of worse problems, click here.

Active ImageExclusive: Scientists, Lawmakers Raise Red Flags About Fire-Retardant Compound In Everyday

For decades, Americans have depended on special chemicals to protect them from fire. But now, there are serious questions about the safety of those chemicals. Two states have already banned them, and six more are considering it. CBS News correspondent Wyatt Andrews has this exclusive report. Be sure to tune in to tonight's CBS Evening News for part 2 of this investigation.

To read the full story Is Fire Retardant A Harmful Toxin?, click here.


Active ImageStudy Shows Many Students Celebrate Dangerously By Binge Drinking On Their 21st Birthday

How did you celebrate turning age 21? A study shows that most students at one Midwestern university drank, with some celebrating with a risky ritual of consuming 21 drinks.

Researchers at the University of Missouri found that when they asked 2,518 students at an unnamed university in the Midwest how they celebrated turning 21, most of them celebrated with alcohol.

To read the full story Risky Ritual: 21 Drinks At Age 21, click here.

Active ImageWithout TV ads, restless legs may take a hike
Generic drugs could lead to less hype over
Active ImageVaginal yeast infections: Are home remedies effective?

A number of natural products purport to prevent or cure vaginal yeast infections
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CDC recommends shingles vaccine for age 60 and up


U.S. health officials on Thursday recommended that people 60 and older get Merck & Co Inc's vaccine Zostavax to protect against shingles, a viral infection that causes a painful, blistering rash.

The risk of getting shingles -- caused by the same varicella-zoster virus responsible for the common childhood illness chicken pox -- rises with age starting at around age 50, and is highest among the elderly.

To read the full story Shingles vaccine for age 60 and up, click here.

Active Image A small molecule may have a big role in making the body clock tick, say Cambridge University researchers. Studies in mice have shown cAMP - a common signalling molecule - is involved in keeping the body clock "rhythms" going.

To read the full story Body clock reset clue discovered, click here.

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Blood pressure, cholesterol drugs are most widely used, new study shows


For the first time, it appears that more than half of all insured Americans are taking prescription medicines regularly for chronic health problems, a study shows.

The most widely used drugs are those to lower high blood pressure and cholesterol
Active ImageGeneric drugs could lead to less hype over
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Adults Can Plug In Their Scores For Several Exercises To See How They Rank Nationally


If you didn't get a Presidential Physical Fitness Award in school, the government is giving you another chance to prove you're in shape.

An adult fitness test is being introduced Wednesday by the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. It will incorporate several of the exercises that millions of students undertake each year as they aim for a certificate signed by the president.

To read the full story A Presidential Fitness Test For Grown-Ups, click here.

Active ImageStudy: Teenage Girls Often Subjected To Unwanted Romantic Advances, Academic Sexism

Despite strides in gender equality most teenage girls continue to experience sexual harassment at home, school, and on the playing field.

A new study shows that 90 percent of girls report experiencing sexual harassment at least once and more than half have experienced academic sexism regarding their ability in male-dominated fields such as science and math.

To read the full story Sexual Harassment A Hurdle For Teen Girls, click here.


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Despite Apprehension, Family Embraces Test That Predicts Colon Cancer Risk


Gretchen Robertson felt like a ticking time bomb. Her father had colon cancer, and her grandmother died from it -- at just 45. So Gretchen got screened at 38 - and it's a good thing she did.


To read the full story The Mixed Blessing Of Genetic Testing, click here.

Active ImageBuild a better salad with tasty, interesting add-ins

While the quintessential pairing of ripe tomatoes and lettuce is certainly enjoyable, a good salad can be so much more. Adding fruits, nuts, and other well-chosen ingredients offers a welcome change. More importantly, incorporating a few more nutritious ingredients is an easy way to serve a more healthful dish.

To read the full story Build a better salad with tasty, interesting add-ins, click here.


Active ImageCoffee and health: What does the research say?

Coffee has a long history of being blamed for many ills
Active ImageSuicide victims who were abused as children have clear genetic changes in their brains, Canadian researchers reported on Tuesday in a finding they said shows neglect can cause biological effects.

The findings offer potential ways to find people at high risk of suicide, and perhaps to treat them and prevent future suicides.


To read the full story Abuse changes brains of suicide victims, click here.

Active ImageSoy Milk Formulas Won't Hurt, but Don't Always Help
Pediatrician Group Weighs in on Merits of Cow, Soy Formulas for Babies

To soy or not to soy? Parents often have to make the choice when it comes to feeding formula to their babies.

But in a clinical report based on a review of available information just released, experts have delivered the definitive word on feeding infants soy protein-based formulas versus cow milk formulas: Why use soy at all?

To read the full story Soy Milk Formulas Won't Hurt, but Don't Always Help, click here.

Active ImageIntrauterine devices are not only among the most effective contraceptives, but they also can help protect women from a cancer of the uterus called endometrial cancer, researchers reported on Tuesday.

To read the full story IUDs seen to reduce cancer risk, click here.


Active ImageU.S. Faces Largest Measles Outbreak in Seven Years as Kids Head to Camp

They're getting ready to pack their bags and head to camp. But as kids prepare to share close quarters, there's something parents should know: The United States is facing its largest measles outbreak in seven years -- and measles spreads fast.

To read the full article How to Spot the Measles, click here.

Active ImageEvery day, 70 million people in the United States suffer from digestive problems like heartburn, acid reflux, indigestion, constipation and diarrhea. Many turn to prescription drugs to control the acid in their stomachs, but some doctors say acid isn
Active ImageResearchers envision a day when workouts are tailored for men vs. women

At the summer Olympics in Beijing, world records likely will be broken, inevitably leading to much speculation about the limits on athletic achievement. Just how much farther can the human body go without steroids or other performance-enhancing substances? And will women ever be able to perform at the level of men
Active ImageNumber Has Doubled In Past Seven Years; Five Times Higher For Diabetic Teens

The number of pregnant women with pre-existing diabetes has more than doubled in seven years, a California study found, a troubling trend that means health risks for both mothers and newborns.

And the number of diabetic teenagers giving birth grew fivefold during the same period, according to the study, the largest of its kind.

To read the full story Study: Pregnant Women With Diabetes Rising, click here.



Active ImageResearchers: Brain Exercises That Improve Working Memory Also Increase Intelligence

An intense game of Concentration or other demanding memory task might kick your intelligence up a notch or two, and the more you engage your brain this way, the smarter you might become.

Researchers reporting in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences say that brain exercises designed to improve working memory also increase scores in fluid intelligence. Fluid intelligence is the ability to reason and solve new problems. It does not rely on memory and is often thought of as having a strong hereditary component. Such intelligence is considered one of the most important factors in learning and is linked to academic and professional success, according to researchers.

To read the full story Boost Your Memory, Become Smarter?, click here.

Active ImageReckless Homicide Charges Filed After 11-Year-Old With Untreated Disease Dies

The parents of an 11-year-old Wisconsin girl who prayed instead of seeking medical help for the diabetic child are facing homicide charges in connection with her death.

Dale and Leilani Neumann were charged with second-degree reckless homicide, Save
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Marathon County District Attorney Jill Falstad announced at a press conference today. If convicted, the couple could be sentenced to up to 25 years in prison.

To read the full story Parents Who Prayed While Child Died Charged, click here.

Active ImageImmunization Rates Falling, CDC Study Finds
Toddlers May Be Missing Crucial Vaccines, CDC Says

Fewer children in the United States are getting the immunizations they need, putting themselves and others at much greater risk of contracting and spreading vaccine-preventable diseases, new research from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests.

To read the full story Immunization Rates Falling, CDC Study Finds, click here.

Active ImageWomen with positive findings need repeat tests to assess risk, experts say

With apologies to Mark Twain, reports of the death of the Pap smear are premature.

Yes, new research suggests a test for the HPV virus that causes cervical cancer may replace the old-fashioned Pap one day as that cancer's primary screening tool. But even enthusiasts say it will take years of additional research to make such a big switch.

To read the full story Pap plus HPV tests can bring confusing results, click here.

Active ImageBenefits of early detection seen even after age 80, new study finds

Women aged 80 and older who have regular mammograms significantly reduce their chances of being diagnosed with late-stage breast cancer, according to a new study. Yet only about 20 percent of women in this age group get mammograms regularly.

To read the full story Women are never too old for a mammogram, click here.


Active ImageGovt. recommended plan lowered heart attack rate 24 percent, study says

A large study offers the strongest evidence yet that a diet the government recommends for lowering blood pressure can save people from heart attack and stroke.

Researchers followed more than 88,000 healthy women for almost 25 years. They examined their food choices and looked at how many had heart attacks and strokes. Those who fared best had eating habits similar to those recommended by the government to stop high blood pressure.

To read the full story Diet helps prevent cardiac trouble in women, click here.

Active ImageNew Study Shows That Act of Choosing Leads to Mental Fatigue, Decreased Productivity

Do you find yourself in a brain fog after choosing which flavor to put in your morning latte? Don't blame it on being sleepy. A new study shows that while mulling over a few options may weigh heavily on your mind, finally choosing one may just plain wear you out.

To read the full story Too Many Choices Exhaust The Brain, click here.


Active ImageBrain Imaging Studies Show Fair Treatment Activates Portion of Brain Linked to Happiness

There's no escaping the fact that life isn't always fair, but that usually doesn't make unfair treatment any easier to accept. Now new brain imaging studies may help explain why.

The research shows that being on the receiving end of fair treatment is inherently rewarding, activating the portion of the brain associated with happiness.

To read the full story Treated Unfairly? Here's Why You're Sore, click here.


Active ImageMid-life high cholesterol raises Alzheimer's risk

High cholesterol levels in your 40s may raise the chance of developing Alzheimer's disease decades later, according to a study underscoring the importance of health factors in middle age on risk for the brain ailment.

The study involving 9,752 people in northern California found that those with high cholesterol levels between ages 40 and 45 were about 50 percent more likely than those with low cholesterol levels to later develop Alzheimer's disease.

To read the full story Mid-life high cholesterol raises Alzheimer's risk, click here.


Active ImageHardly a week goes by without news of antioxidants' health-promoting benefits. Experts believe these nutritional substances may help prevent heart disease, fight certain cancers, ward off dementia, and even slow certain aging processes.

There are thousands of antioxidants found in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, legumes, meats, poultry, and fish. Even foods once not known for being especially healthful, such as chocolate, coffee, and red wine, are now recognized as potent delivery systems for beneficial antioxidants.

To read the full story The DNA of antioxidants, click here.

Active ImageDespite objections from the indoor tanning industry, dermatologists present more evidence that there's no such thing as a healthy tan.


At this year's Oscars actress Anne Hathaway stood out not just because of her gorgeous red Marchesa gown but because of the creamy pale skin she wore under it. If her decision to appear sans tan was an attempt to send a signal that tanning is losing its glamorous glow, her timing couldn't be better, dermatologists say.

To read the full story Fake Bake Debate, click here.

Active ImageKaro syrup for constipation: Is it safe for babies?

Is it safe to give my baby corn (Karo) syrup for constipation?

Giving infants corn (Karo) syrup for constipation is no longer recommended.

It is true that corn syrup draws more fluid into the intestine, which makes stool less hard. But in excess, corn syrup can cause diarrhea in infants, resulting in water and electrolyte losses.


To read the full story Karo syrup for constipation: Is it safe for babies?, click here.

Active ImageBisephenol A, Used In Many Shatter-Proof Containers, Liked To Hormone Issues, Tumors

A chemical used to make baby bottles and other shatterproof plastic containers could be linked to a range of hormonal problems, a preliminary government report has found.

The report was greeted by some environmental groups as confirmation of their warnings, while chemical makers latched on to the report's preliminary nature and its authors' warning against drawing overly worrisome conclusions.

To read the full story Chemical In Plastic Bottles May Be Toxic, click here.


Active ImageThey Can Make All The Difference During Emergencies; Dr. Emily Senay Treats Conventional Wisdom

Almost everyone has been faced with a medical emergency.

And the first aid measures you take at the scene -- even before you call 911 or head to the emergency room -- could make all the difference.

On The Early Show Wednesday, medical correspondent Dr. Emily Senay looked at common first aid mistakes. Her do's and don'ts may surprise you.

To read the full story Common First-Aid Mistakes, click here.

Active ImageBreathing Problems During Sleep May Cause Fatigue That Masquerades as Depression

When Lissa Schulz, a 34-year-old mother of two living in Austin, Tex., was diagnosed with depression six years ago, she never suspected that something that she was doing in her sleep could be the root of her problem.

To read the full article Depressed? You May Be Snoring, click here. 
Active ImageUNTIL nine years ago, Dr. Neal Grossman didn
Active ImageStudy With Mice Suggests Antioxidant May Stop Breast Cancer Growth

An antioxidant in green tea may be a powerful weapon against breast cancer. A new study shows the green tea antioxidant EGCG (epigallocatechin-3-gallate) significantly slowed breast cancer growth in female mice.

To read the full article Green Tea Ingredient Slows Breast Cancer, click here.

Active ImageDr. Jon LaPook And Dr. Lori Warren Respond To Most Frequent Queries From Viewers

n the CBS Evening News Thursday, CBS News medical correspondent Dr. Jon LaPook had a report featuring Dr. Lori Warren, a gynecologic surgeon. She believes strongly in a new way to do hysterectomies. Dr. Warren says laparoscopic hysterectomies dramatically reduce the invasiveness and pain involved, as well as the length and difficulty of recovery -- yet most doctors still use the standard method of performing the procedure.

To read the full article Hysterectomies: Your Questions Answered, click here.

Active ImageThe Pill Is Back; IUDs Safer

Birth control options are growing for women 40 and older - a group that once viewed its choices as pretty much limited to tube-tying surgery and condoms.

For them, the pill is back. So is the IUD. The reason is that both are safer. There's even a nonsurgical method of tube-tying.

To read the full article Birth Control Options After 40, click here.

Active ImageFrom Ear Candling To Colon Cleansing, Here Are 5 Home Remedies To Avoid

Some home remedies like cornstarch and water on a bee sting work just fine, but other do-it-yourself health techniques can spell trouble. For instance, do you really think you should be cleansing your colon from the comfort of your home? Or removing wax from your ear by holding a lit candle inches from your head?

To read the full article 5 Home Remedy No-No's, click here.


Active ImageNearly a third were 1 week old or younger, first U.S. study reveal

About 1 in 50 U.S. infants is a victim of nonfatal child abuse or neglect in a year, according to the first national study of the problem in that age group.

The study focused on children younger than 1 year, and found nearly a third were one week old or younger when the abuse or neglect occurred.

To read the full article 1 in 50 infants suffers abuse, CDC finds, click here.

Active ImagePeople Who Lower or Keep Anxiety Levels Steady Up to 60% Less Likely to Have a Heart Attack or Die

Here's another reason to learn relaxation techniques. Researchers have found that lowering or keeping anxiety levels in check dramatically cuts the risk of heart attack or death in people with heart disease.

In a study of more than 500 heart patients, those who reduced or kept their anxiety levels steady were about 50% to 60% less likely to have a heart attack or die compared with those who experienced an increase in anxiety levels.

To read the full story, Lower Your Stress, Spare Your Heart, click here.

Active ImageStudy Shows Stress on Anniversary of a Parent's Death Can Raise Risk of Sudden Death

 If the anniversary of the loss of a loved one is approaching, try to prepare for the grief you will experience. That's the advice of doctors who found that the psychological stress associated with that date may raise your own risk of dying suddenly.

"The anniversary of the death of a close family member, especially a mother or father, is an important trigger of sudden death, especially in males," says researcher Ivan Mendoza, MD, of the Central University of Venezuela in Caracas.

To read the full story, Sudden Death Linked to Grieving, click here.

Active ImageFew of us embrace the signs of aging skin--those fine lines and creases that creep up after 30. Eating a healthy diet, getting enough sleep and using a moisturizing sunscreen will help preserve complexions, but they won't make a 50-year-old look 35. And for those who want a dramatic age reversal, there are plenty of medical solutions
Active ImageStudy Showing Vytorin Does Not Improve Heart Disease Prompts Return To Older Statin Drugs

Leading doctors urged a return to older, tried-and-true treatments for high cholesterol after hearing full results Sunday of a failed trial of Vytorin.

Millions of Americans already take the drug or one of its components, Zetia. But doctors were stunned to learn that Vytorin failed to improve heart disease even though it worked as intended to reduce three key risk factors.

To read the full story, Doctors Rethink New Cholesterol Treatments, click here.

Active ImageNot all fish is safe to eat raw, chefs caution

As Japanese sushi conquers restaurants and homes around the world, industry experts are fighting the side-effects of the raw fish boom: fake sushi bars, over-confident amateurs, poisoned consumers.

Once a rare and exotic treat, seaweed rolls and bites of raw tuna on vinegared rice are now familiar to most food fans. So familiar, in fact, that many hobby cooks in Europe and the United States like to make them in their own kitchens.

To read the full story, Experts warn about sushi risks, click here.

Active ImageDon't even think about putting your purse on the kitchen counter

Location, location, location: Store owners aren't the only ones concerned with finding the perfect spot in which to situate their stuff. Researchers in a wide variety of fields know that how you organize your environment
Active ImageDecision expected by summer on vaccine that helps prevent cervical cancer

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration will consider whether to expand use of a vaccine intended to prevent cervical cancer to women aged 27 to 45, the vaccine maker said Wednesday.

Gardasil, made by Merck & Co., currently is approved for use in girls and women aged 9 through 26 to block four types of human papilloma virus, which can cause cervical cancer and genital warts.

To read the full story FDA to consider HPV shot for women up to 45, click here.

Active ImageStudy: Constant chest compressions triple survival in out-of-hospital cases

A new approach to cardiac resuscitation designed to maintain nearly constant chest compressions triples the rate of survival of "out-of-hospital" cardiac arrest, study findings suggest.

To read the full story New approach to CPR may save more lives, click here.

Active ImageA stressed one can be worse than being single, new study suggests

A happy marriage is good for your blood pressure, but a stressed one can be worse than being single, a preliminary study suggests.

That second finding is a surprise because prior studies have shown that married people tend to be healthier than singles, said researcher Julianne Holt-Lunstad.

To read the full story Good marriage equals good blood pressure, click here.

Active ImageResearch Shows That Men Are Likely To Eat More Meat, While Women Eat More Vegetables

If men are from Mars and women are from Venus, then Mars is a land where the refrigerators are stocked with meat and frozen pizza and Venus has a bounty of yogurt, fruits and vegetables, a new study suggests.

The study of eating habits of adults - called the most extensive of its kind - was a telephone survey of 14,000 Americans. It confirmed conventional wisdom that most men eat more meat than women, and women eat more fruits and vegetables.

To read the full story Men And Women Have Different Eating Styles, click here.

Active ImageTurning the Tables May Not Be Best Solution, Experts Say

On Tuesday, one day after being sworn into office, New York Gov. David Paterson and his wife Michelle appeared before the press to defuse the issue of their past infidelity to one another.

"I betrayed a commitment to my wife several years ago, and I do not feel I've betrayed my commitment to the citizens of New York state," Paterson said during the press conference. "I haven't broken any laws, I don't think I've violated my oath of office, and I saw this as a private matter."

To read the full story Does 'Revenge Cheating' Work?, click here.

Active ImageDoctors are overprescribing antibiotics for common sinus infections and related conditions, possibly in the false belief they may help in cases where symptoms are protracted, researchers reported on Friday.

Bacteria can cause rhinosinusitis -- an inflammation of the sinuses -- but a virus such as the common cold is often a more likely culprit so antibiotics seldom work, the researchers reported in the journal Lancet.

To read the full article Antibiotics overprescribed for common viruses: study, click here.

Active ImageBreast cancer patients who are overweight have more aggressive disease and are likely to die sooner, U.S. researchers reported on Friday.

A dangerous type of breast cancer, known as inflammatory breast cancer, was seen in 45 percent of obese patients, compared with 30 percent of overweight patients and 15 percent of patients of healthy weight.

To read the full article Overweight women have worse breast cancer: study, click here.

Sample ImageIt
Active ImageStudy Shows Youngsters Use Inhalants As "Gateway" To Other Illicit Drugs

A newly released federal government report points to an alarming trend - that preteens and young teens who use drugs chose inhalants as a "gateway" drug to other illicit drugs.

The findings released at the National Inhalant Prevention Coalition's latest news conference reveal that among young drug users, 12- and 13-year-olds sniff common household chemicals to get high, often before moving on to marijuana or abusing pain pills.

To read the full article Tweens Favor Inhalants To Get High, click here.

Active ImageUp 12% Among Gay/Bisexual Men; 7th-Straight Year Of Increases After Being Nearly Eliminated

A raging epidemic of sexually transmitted diseases in gay/bisexual men drove U.S. syphilis rates up 12 percent in 2007 - the seventh-consecutive year of syphilis increases.

Meanwhile, a CDC study found that tests for another common STD -gonorrhea - miss one in three infections among men who have sex with men.

To read the full article Syphilis Skyrockets In U.S., click here.


Active ImageStrong Smells, Loud Noises Also Cited As Headache Triggers

It isn't clear whether frequent headache sufferers can predict the weather, but most believe weather changes trigger their headache pain.

In a survey conducted by the National Headache Foundation (NHF), three out of four people who had frequent headaches reported weather or barometric pressure changes as triggers.

To read the full article Sufferers Say Weather Behind Headaches, click here.

Active ImageBetter Mood May Be as Close as Your Next Workout

It's about that time of year when the sight of wool makes your skin crawl
Active ImageHow you respond to eating cues can affect how much you weigh

Most people probably think they stop eating when they're full. They don't realize that feeling satisfied comes from a combination of signals, including how good the food tastes or how quickly certain hormones get released into the body. It may also depend on where they live.

To read the full article Stop when you're full? You must be French, click here.


Active ImageSoldiers coming home with permanent hearing damage and ringing in ears

Large numbers of soldiers and Marines caught in roadside bombings and firefights in Iraq and Afghanistan are coming home with permanent hearing loss and ringing in their ears, prompting the military to redouble its efforts to protect the troops from noise.

Hearing damage is the No. 1 disability in the war on terror, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs, and some experts say the true toll could take decades to become clear. Nearly 70,000 of the more than 1.3 million troops who have served in the two war zones are collecting disability for tinnitus, a potentially debilitating ringing in the ears, and more than 58,000 are on disability for hearing loss, the VA said.

To read the full article Hearing loss is silent epidemic in U.S. troops, click here.

Active ImageCDC Survey Finds 5.8M Older Adults Reported Falls In 3 Months; 1.8M Hurt Themselves

When Shirley Keegan started falling, life as she knew it took a tumble, CBS News medical correspondent Dr. Jon LaPook reports.

"Its very frightening," she said. "You don't know you are gonna fall, very unexpected and as you are going down you are saying 'oh no,' you know, and in your mind your saying 'oh no.'"

A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention survey released today found that over a three-month period, 1.8 million adults hurt themselves from falling.

To read the full article Millions Of Older Adults Get Hurt Falling, click here.


Editorial:

If you are concerned about falling and injuring your self? If you have episodes of dizziness (vertigo),  any loss of function due to back or lower extremity pain, you should
Active ImageExpert Offers Tips On How To Keep Your Back Pain-Free

Back pain is among the most common medical problems. Millions of Americans deal with it daily.
But structural issues with bones, muscles, and more are only part of the back-pain equation.

Chiropractor Todd Sinett, author of "The Truth about Back Pain," explained the roles of other factors, nutrition and emotion, and offered tips for keeping backs pain-free, on The Early Show's Saturday Edition.

To read the full article Putting Back Pain Behind You, click here.

Active ImagePsychologist Says More Men Help With Housework and Those That Do May Get More Sex

American men still don't pull their weight when it comes to housework and child care, but collectively they're not the slackers they used to be. The average dad has gradually been getting better about picking himself up off the sofa and pitching in, according to a new report in which a psychologist suggests the payoff for doing more chores could be more sex.

To read the full article Men Who Do Housework May Get More Sex, click here.

Active ImageStudent Josh Sommer Is Determined to Rid the World -- and Himself -- of Cancer

In 2005, Josh Sommer, then 18, had just started college life at Duke University when he found out he was dying.

"It was just utter shock," Sommer said. "I guess the best way I could describe it is the same feeling I felt after 9/11. Just total helplessness, hopelessness, not knowing what I should do next. I have a tumor in my head and not only that, it's in a difficult location within the center of my head."

To read the full article Racing to Find the Cure for His Own Cancer, click here.

Active ImageLow-intensity aerobic exercise can increase energy levels and decrease fatigue, finds a new study.

Researchers at the University of Georgia found that when a group of sedentary people were exposed to low-intensity aerobic exercise for 20 minutes three times a week for six weeks, their fatigue levels dropped by 65 per cent and their energy levels rose by 20 per cent.

To read the full article Low-intensity exercise can boost energy, curb fatigue, click here.

Active ImageManorexia. Orthorexia. Diabulimia. Binge Eating Disorder. All are dangerous variations on the eating disorders anorexia and bulimia, and have become buzzwords that are popping up on Web sites and blogs, on television and in newspaper articles. As celebrity magazines chronicle the glamorous and the suffering, therapists and a growing number of researchers are trying to treat and understand the conditions.

To read the full article Starving Themselves, Cocktail in Hand, click here.

Active ImageThose took a more active role had higher blood pressure, study says

People who take a proactive role in their healthcare may be better-informed, but that may not necessarily translate into better health, results of a study hint.

In the study of 189 adults with high blood pressure, researchers found that those who wanted a greater say in their healthcare tended to have higher blood pressure and cholesterol than patients who let their doctors have most of the control.

To read the full article
Active Image11 states waive fees for worst mistakes, but most will charge you or insurer

When Kevin Baccam of Urbandale, Iowa, went in for hernia surgery in August 2005, he expected to come home with a scar on the right side of his groin.

But the 33-year-old school district controller actually wound up with two scars in the delicate region
Active ImageDr. Emily Senay Reports On The FDA's Investigation Of The Drug Heparin

Every day thousands of Americans rely on the blood thinner Heparin to survive. Now that drug is under suspicion for 21 deaths and hundreds of allergic reactions. Baxter International, a major manufacturer of the drug, has stopped selling almost all forms of Heparin.

To read the full article Blood-Thinning Drug Under Suspicion, click here.

Active ImageDoctors blame rise in belly fat for spike, despite blood pressure medications

Strokes have tripled in recent years among middle-aged women in the U.S., an alarming trend doctors blame on the obesity epidemic.

Nearly 2 percent of women ages 35 to 54 reported suffering a stroke in the most recent federal health survey, from 1999 to 2004. Only about half a percent did in the previous survey, from 1988 to 1994.

To read the full article Strokes among middle-aged women triple, click here.


Active ImageDoctors Turning To New Painkillers That Don't Cause Addiction

For many Americans, drug abuse is a painful fact of life. And pain is often the cause. By one estimate, more than 33 million Americans have abused prescription pain killers. For the second part of the series, Easing the Pain, CBS News medical correspondent Dr. Jon LaPook examines new prescription pain killers that are designed to prevent abuse.

To read the full article Relieving Pain With Abuse-Proof Drugs, click here.

Active ImageMedical Mystery: Persistent Sexual Arousal Syndrome
Private Moments Turn Public When PSAS Renders a Woman's Body Out of Her Control

If you thought "Grey's Anatomy" writers invented Persistent Sexual Arousal Syndrome (PSAS), think again. PSAS, identified and named just six years ago, remains a mysterious condition that thousands of women wish they didn't have. They are constantly on the edge of orgasm regardless of time, place or circumstance. And while this situation might sound desirable, funny or just plain weird it is actually akin to being a prisoner: a nightmarish reality where a woman's body acts independently of her own desires.

To read the full article Medical Mystery: Persistent Sexual Arousal Syndrome, click here.

Active ImageFew meet recommendations for fruit, vegetables, fiber

A one-year follow-up study of patients with heart disease found that few are meeting recommendations for fruit, vegetable and fiber intake, and they were eating a "disturbing" amount of trans fat, Dr. Yunsheng Ma and colleagues from the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester found.

They surveyed 555 people about their eating habits one year after they had been diagnosed with heart disease using coronary angiography. All had suffered some type of cardiac event, such as heart attack, abnormal heart rhythm, or chest pain.

To read the full article Heart patients rarely change eating habits, click here.

Active ImageStudy Shows Younger Siblings Shortchanged On Attention

 Firstborn children spend about 3,000 more hours of quality time with their parents during childhood than the next-oldest child, new research suggests.

The study found that in two-child households, the elder children typically got between 20 and 30 minutes more quality time with each parent each day between the ages of 4 and 13.

To read the full article Firstborns Get More Quality Parent Time, click here.

Active ImageUS Cancer Deaths Up by 5,400 in 2005; Death Rate Continues to Fall Among Total Population

U.S. cancer deaths rose by more than 5,000 in 2005, a somewhat disappointing reversal of a two-year downward trend, the American Cancer Society said in a report issued Wednesday.

The group counted 559,312 people who died from cancer.

To read the full article US Cancer Deaths Rose by 5,400 in 2005, click here.

Active ImageA longer interval between the age a woman first begins to menstruate and her age when she first gives birth is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, the results of a study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology suggests.

To read the full article Breast cancer risk linked with fertility timing, click here.
 

 
Active ImageIT can happen for no reason, it seems, taking you completely by surprise. And it can be excruciating. Suddenly, a muscle contracts violently, as if it had been prodded with a jolt of electricity. And it remains balled in a tight knot as painful second after painful second drags on.

To read the full article A Long-Running Mystery, the Common Cramp, click here.

Active ImageTobacco smoke is known as a primary cause of periodontal disease, also known as gum disease. Now a new study finds regular use of cannabis (marijuana) is also associated with an increase of gum disease.

Researchers in New Zealand conducted a study looking at marijuana and gum disease. They included more than 900 participants who were born in 1972 or 1973. The participants were asked if they smoked marijuana at ages 18, 21, 26 and 32. The answers included never, some and often. Some was considered to be one to 40 times total during those four years, and often meant more than 41 times.

To read the full article Smoking Pot Causes Gum Disease, click here.


Active ImageMen who share the load (of laundry and otherwise) inspire lust

I had a party not too long ago where a funny thing happened. One of the guests
Active ImageSwedish Study Finds That Fast Food Can Stress the Liver

"Welcome to Fast Foods! How can we destroy your internal organs?"

It's not very catchy, but fast food restaurants may as well update their greetings, considering the negative effects their food can have on our health, our hearts and, now, our livers.

To read the full article Fast Food: The Fast Track to Organ Damage, click here.



Active ImageCDC Issues First-Ever Death Count From 'Choking Game'; Warns Parents to Watch for Signs


At least 82 youths have died from the so-called "choking game," according to the first government count of fatalities from the tragic fad.

In the game, children use dog leashes or bungee cords wrapped around their necks or other means to temporarily cut blood flow to their head. The goal is a dreamlike, floating-in-space feeling when blood rushes back into the brain.

To read the full article CDC: Death Count 82 for 'Choking Game', click here.

Active ImageNew Research May Pave Way for New Alcoholism Treatment Therapies

A drug known to inhibit the stress response in the brain may also be a potential weapon against alcohol addiction.

So suggests a small study on recovering alcoholics published Tuesday in the journal Science.

To read the full article Stress-Related Drug May Cut Alcoholics' Cravings, click here.

Active ImageSix Common Myths You Should Know To Protect Your Heart

Dr. Tim Johnson exposed heart disease myths on "Good Morning America" today.

February is National Heart Month, a time to raise awareness about heart disease, which remains the leading cause of death for American men and women. Ask yourself if you're taking care of your heart, and do not be fooled by these common myths.

To read the full article Heart Disease Myths Busted, click here.

Active ImageHerbal Options May Help Some Women Control Pain From Period

In the blinding, searing, white-hot moment of the first major cramp of the month
Active ImageMore women opt to have both breasts removed

When Cheryl Lawrence got a diagnosis of breast cancer, her surgeon told her she could save her breast. But Lawrence decided to have it removed anyway. And then she decided to have the healthy one removed, too.

"I didn't want to ever have to deal with this again," said Lawrence, 40, of Olympia, Wash. "I just didn't want to have to worry about it. For me, it was a matter of peace of mind."

To read the full article Choosing radical cancer surgery, click here.


Active ImageLifestyle Expert Sissy Biggers Offers Food For Thought To Chew On -- And Recipe

Who doesn't love comfort food, especially in the dead of winter?

We all have a few whose smells and textures evoke a cozy, safe, nesting feel. When we walk in a room and smell a meatloaf cooking or apple pie in the oven, they bring back childhood memories.

To read the full article Comfort Foods We Crave -- And Why, click here.



Active ImageNapping May Give The Brain A Chance To Reinforce New Memories, Sleep Experts Say

Take a daytime nap, and you might wake up with a sharper memory. That's what happened in a new napping study that involved 33 undergraduate students.

First, the students took three different tests of their short-term memory.

In one test, they had to learn and remember pairs of unrelated words, such as "alligator" and "cigar." In another test, they had to navigate and remember a maze shown on a computer screen. And in the last test, the students had to copy a complex drawing onto a sheet of paper, and then
sketch the drawing from memory.

To read the full article Daytime Nap May Boost Memory, click here.

Active ImageBreathing Problems During Sleep More Common in Older People, Study Shows

As people age, their breathing during sleep may become more irregular, a new study shows.

That news comes from a study of 163 healthy, non-obese adults who spent a night at a sleep lab, with their every breath monitored as they slept.

The researchers tracked the number of times each person's breathing was disrupted during sleep. Those disruptions included not breathing for at least 10 seconds or slowdowns in breathing.

To read the full article Sleep Disruptions May Arise With Age, click here.

Active ImageClean or Boiled Water as Good at Cleaning Wounds as Saline
Water may be a good alternative to saline when it comes to cleaning wounds.

A Cochrane Review finds using drinkable tap water to clean wounds does not increase infection rates. But there is no evidence that it reduces infection rates or increases healing compared to simply leaving the wound alone.

It is part of standard medical care to clean wounds caused by injuries but there is a debate about the best way to do it. Research shows using antiseptic with chemicals may slow wound healing. Many people recommend saline (salt solution) instead, but some worry this will wash away growth promoters and infection-fighting white blood cells. Sterile saline can be expensive and is not always available.

To read the full article Clean or Boiled Water as Good at Cleaning Wounds as Saline, click here.

Active ImageA common drug may help prevent bone fractures in postmenopausal women. A Cochrane Review shows women who take 10 milligrams a day of the bisphosphate drug alendronate (Fosamax) can help prevent the loss of bone mass and reduce the risk of fractures. This applies to women who have started to lose bone mass but have no fractures (primary prevention) as well as those who have lost a lot of bone mass and/or have had fractures (secondary prevention).

To read the full article Prevent Bone Fractures After Menopause, click here.

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Active ImageEmotional Stress Of Watching Championship Sporting Events Can Increase Heart Troubles

Study: Watching Sports May Up Heart Woes
Emotional Stress Of Watching Championship Sporting Events Can Increase Heart Troubles

To read the full article Study: Watching Sports May Up Heart Woes, click here.

A Little Girl with a Big Appetite and an Even Bigger Temper
While Dealing With Terrible Tantrums, Family of Obese 5-Year-Old Seeks Help

Since the story of Kayla Galo -- a 4-year-old who at 105 pounds is twice the average weight for a child her age -- was first posted on ABCNews.com on January 31, it has had enormous response from readers. You can read those comments by clicking on the "Comments" link on the right side of this page. You can also see much more about this story tonight on "Nightline" at 11:35 p.m. ET.

To read the full article A Little Girl with a Big Appetite and an Even Bigger Temper, click here.
   
 
Active ImageKeith Orr thought he would surprise his doctor when he came for a checkup. His doctor had told him to have a weight-loss operation to reduce the amount of food his stomach could hold, worried because Mr. Orr, at 6 feet 2 inches, weighed 278 pounds. He also had a blood sugar level so high he was on the verge of diabetes and a strong family history of early death from heart attacks. And Mr. Orr, who is 44, had already had a heart attack in 1998 when he was 35.

To read the full article Lessons of Heart Disease, Learned and Ignored, click here.


Active ImageStudy Shows More Women Under 45 Dying of Heart Disease, While Rate for Men Is Leveling Off

For decades, heart disease death rates have been falling. But a new study shows a troubling turn more women under 45 are dying of heart disease due to clogged arteries, and the death rate for men that age has leveled off.

Heart experts aren't sure what went wrong, but they think increasing rates of obesity and other risk factors are to blame.

To read the full article Heart Disease Kills More Women Under 45, click here.

Active ImageYounger adults better at recalling details of real and made-up events

While most children can easily imagine themselves as astronauts, athletes or superheroes, make-believe might not be so easy for the kids' grandparents.

Researchers have long known that recalling memories of personal events is harder for older adults than younger ones. Recent brain imaging studies have shown that people use the same mechanisms in the brain to imagine as they do to remember, suggesting that older adults may have as much trouble imagining as they do remembering.

To read the full article Memory loss linked to loss of imagination, click here.

Sample ImageResearchers: Pregnant Women Who Drink 2 Or More Cups Of Coffee A Day Double Their Risk

Making coffee together is a fun ritual for mom Jennifer Johnson and 10-month old James. "I have to have it to wake up in the morning," Johnson says.

But Johnson cut out caffeine during her pregnancy with James - concerned it may have contributed to a previous miscarriage, report CBS News correspondent Thalia Assuras.

To read the full article Study Links Caffeine To Miscarriage Risk, click here.

Sample ImageImmigrants' Traditional Medicines a Common Cause of Lead Poisoning in Children

Maria didn't mean to poison her children. Quite the opposite. Worried about her daughters' lack of appetite, the young Houston mother was merely following her grandmother's advice when she gave the two girls and a niece a dose of "greta" a Mexican folk medicine used to treat children's stomach ailments.

To read the full article Folk Medicines Contain Lead, click here.

Active ImageMajor Headache? Many Migraine Culprits Are Preventable, Pain Experts Say

"All things in moderation" is a wise motto for all of us, but especially for those who suffer from painful migraines.

These skull-crushing headaches can be debilitating and last for days, confining a person to a soft bed in a darkened room.

To read the full article Major Headache? Seven Common Migraine Triggers, click here.


Active Image A new study has linked vitamin D and a reduction of chronic pain, lending to voices calling for increased fortification or supplementation of the nutrient in diets.

The study, presented at the American Society of Anesthesiologists 2007 Annual Meeting in San Francisco, found that one in four patients who suffer from chronic pain also have inadequate blood levels of vitamin D. As such, the researchers put forth that the vitamin D deficiency possibly contributed to the patients' ongoing pain.

To read the full article Vitamin D deficiency linked to greater pain, click here.

Active ImagePhysical Education and Active Play Help Teens Maintain Normal Weight as Adults

Adolescents who participate in physical education at school are more likely to maintain a