August 2014


Norovirus  'Stomach flu' rips through the
   nation

   Stomach viruses tearing through communities from
   California to the Carolinas wrecked the December holidays
   for some, and they are getting the new year off to an
   uncomfortable start for others.

   The most likely culprits, experts say, are noroviruses, the most
   common cause of contagious gastroenteritis, better known as
   the "stomach flu." Cases occur every winter, but health officials
   say that in recent weeks they have seen two to three times as
 
 many cases as usual.

To read the rest of this article, click here.

For information on the flu, click here.

Active Image  How to get healthy in 4 hours a week 

   Can't turn off the TV? Make better use of time during
 
 commercials

   A Nielsen Media Research report from fall 2006 shows that
   the average   American spends four hours and 35 minutes
   watching television each day. Each week, television viewing
   adds up to more than 30 hours

Active Image  Psychological Approach Helps
  Back Pain

   Most people suffer from low back pain at some point
   in their lives, but people with long-lasting pain often
   get little relief from the most widely recommended treatments.

   Now a new research review shows that focusing on the mind
  
may be the best approach to treating the back for many people with chronic low back pain.

To read the full story, click here.

Editor's Commnetary:

We have long believed that the key to both wellness and illness lies within our mind and our thoughts. What we think empowers our body. When we think healthy thoughts we empower a healthy body and mind. When we think positive, constructive thoughts we can control pain including back pain.

For more information on the relationship of mind, body and healing, click here.

Active Image  Healthy cereals to get taste of chocolate

   In a New Year's twist, cereal giants are about to try luring adults with
   an ingredient more likely to show up on a kid's favorite food list
   chocolate.

   Next month, Quaker will roll out Life Chocolate Oat Crunch

Active Image  New moms at risk for range of mental
 
problems

  Major study finds issues go beyond postpartum depression

   New moms face increased risks for a variety of mental problems, not
   just postpartum depression, according to one of the largest studies of
   psychiatric illness after childbirth.

   New dads aren

Active Image  Herbal treatment little help for
  menopause

   A popular herbal treatment called black cohosh is practically
   ineffective at relieving hot flashes and night sweats in women
   going through menopause, a study found.

The findings were disappointing news for women seeking alternatives to estrogen-progestin hormone supplements, which have been linked to breast cancer and heart problems.

For the complete story, click here.

For more information on menopause, click here.

Active Image

  Chocolate can do good things for your
  heart, skin and brain

   Listen to the way people malign chocolate: Sinful! Decadent!
   To die for! There's even that popular restaurant dessert known
   as "Death by Chocolate." But is this any way to talk about a loved
one -- especially during the season of comfort and joy?

To read the complete story, click here.

Active Image  Kids' bodies trained to tolerate
  allergies

   Elizabeth White's first encounter with peanuts --
   a nibble of a peanut butter cracker at age 14 months --
   left the toddler gasping for breath. Within minutes, her
   airways were swelling shut.

  A mere fifth of a peanut was enough to trigger an allergic reaction.

So it was with trepidation that her parents enrolled Elizabeth, at 4 1/2, in a groundbreaking experiment: Could eating tiny amounts of the very foods that endanger them eventually train children's bodies to overcome severe food allergies?

To learn more about allergies, click here.

Active Image  Cracking the Code of Longevity

  Achieving a Long Life With a Sharp Mind May Have a Genetic
  Component, New Research Suggests

  Living for 100 years is an unlikely prospect for most of us.
  But for those lucky few who make it to the century mark, a
  crucial gene variation relating to cholesterol levels may play an
important part in their longevity.

To read the full story, clck here.