August 2014


seniorpain114x170.jpgHere’s an excuse to stay in bed this weekend with zero guilt: Logging extra hours of sleep can reduce pain sensitivity and increase daytime alertness, according to a new study soon to be published in the journal SLEEP.

To read the full story 9 Natural Pain Relievers, click here.
LegCramps150x170.jpgIt’s happened to practically everyone: A sudden, painful cramp in your leg or foot startles you awake in the middle of the night. Studies suggest that one-third to one-half of people over 60 get these involuntary muscle contractions on a regular basis, and their frequency may increase with age. Lasting anywhere from a few seconds to several excruciating minutes, cramps occur when irritated nerves send muscles a signal to repeatedly contract.

To read the full story Kick Leg Cramps, click here.
VitaminsAtoZ150x170.jpgThe best way to get crucial vitamins and minerals is by eating the right balance of healthy foods. But for people over age 50, even the best diet may not provide enough of some important nutrients. "How many of us can claim to be getting the full complement of what we need from our diet each day?" asks Meir Stampfer, M.D., professor of nutrition and epidemiology at Harvard University.

To read the full story Vitamins From A to Z, click here.
therapy150x170.jpgAmong patients who don't respond to antidepressants, adding talk therapy to their prescription appears to ease depressive symptoms, a new study found.

In a randomized controlled trial, adding cognitive behavioral therapy or CBT to drug therapy was associated with a more than threefold increased likelihood of response to treatment after six months, Dr. Nicola Wiles of the University of Bristol in England and colleagues reported online in The Lancet.

To read the full story Talk Therapy Boosts Response to Antidepressants, click here.
optimism150x170.jpgA resilient attitude may be the secret to successful aging, perhaps even trumping good physical health, finds a new study.

Researchers surveyed 1,006 randomly selected adults in San Diego, Calif., between the ages of 50 and 99 (with a mean age of about 77) through a 25-minute phone interview, followed by a mail-in survey. In addition to evaluating the participants' physical health conditions, such as chronic disease and disability, the survey looked at more subjective factors like adults' social engagement and self-assessments of their overall health and degree of successful aging.

To read the full story Optimism Is Key to Successful Aging, click here.
DDaltmed88x170.jpgDepartment of Defense Embracing Alternative Medicine

Once labeled quackery these methods show promise for Veterans

Would you be surprised to know that the Department of Defense has designated several billion dollars for research into these healing techniques.

To read the full article Department of Defense Embracing Alternative Medicine, click here.
ABOtype130x170.jpgBlood Type May Affect Stroke Risk, Study Finds

Your blood type might affect your risk for stroke. People with AB and women with B were a little more likely to suffer one than people with O blood — the most common type, a study found.

To read the full article Blood Type May Affect Stroke Risk, Study Finds, click here.
spndtime170x150.jpgDads Are Doing More, but Moms Are More Stressed, Study Finds

With growing evidence that the American dad has stepped up his game when it comes to housework and child care, U.S. households would seem to have been swept clean of gender inequity.

To read the full article Dads Are Doing More, but Moms Are More Stressed, study finds, click here.
multitaskmon150x170.jpgWomen Are More Masterful at Multitasking Than Men

Women remain more adept at multitasking than their male counterparts. From managing a range of household chores while helping their children with homework, to performing computer work while handling a phone call, women pump up the volume of productivity to keep up in their busy lives.

To read the full article Women Are More Masterful at Multitasking Than Men, click here.
califestyle170x170.jpgOver 40% of Cancers Due to Lifestyle, Says Review

Nearly half of cancers diagnosed in the UK each year - over 130,000 in total - are caused by avoidable life choices including smoking, drinking and eating the wrong things, a review reveals.

To read the full article Over 40% of Cancers Due to Lifestyle, Says Review , click here.

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High Fruit And Veggie Diet In Females Reduces Stroke Risk


Females who consume lots of fruit, vegetables and grains have a lower risk of stroke, even if they have a history of cardiovascular disease.

To read the full article High Fruit And Vegg

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Freezing temps? Check. Gray skies? Check. Crabby mood? Check again. But not for long! It may be gloomy outside, but your outlook doesn't have to be...

To read the full article The secrets to a super-happy winter, click here.


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Health Tip: Treating Canker Sores
Suggestions that may ease the pain


Canker sores are small ulcers that form inside and around the mouth, often due to an injury to sensitive tissue.

To read the full article Health Tip: Treating Canker Sores, click here.
shift-work130x100.jpgPeople who work shifts are not able to comply with the natural sleep/wake rhythm based on the cycle of day and night. Their internal body clock becomes unbalanced. The consequences of this can be a variety of metabolic disorders which, on a long-term basis, can be accompanied by a range of illnesses, psychological disorders and even the inability to work.

To read the full article Shift Work And Metabolic Disorders , click here.

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 Meditation Can Make the World Seem a Less Threatening Place
It's going to be a difficult holiday season for a man named Demitrius, who didn't want to use his full name to protect his privacy.

To read the full article Addicts Overcome Holiday Stress with Meditation , click here.


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Do all contraceptives lower ovarian cancer risk?


Birth control pills have long been known to reduce the risk of ovarian cancer, but a new study suggests any type of contraceptive - even, surprisingly, vasectomy - may also be protective.

To read the full article Do all contraceptives lower ovarian cancer risk?, click here.


vaccine130x100.jpg12 Reasons Why Adults Need Vaccines
Vaccines aren't just for kids. Here's why grown-ups need them, too.


Think of vaccines and you might envision teary-eyed kids at the doctor’s office or flu clinic getting a cartoon character bandage on their arm after getting a shot.

To read the full article 12 Reasons Why Adults Need Vaccines , click here.

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Aspirin May Reduce Cancer Risk, But Caution Urged
Some experts say study isn't strong enough for doctors to start recommending a daily dose


A new report from British scientists suggests that long-term, daily aspirin use may modestly lower the risk of dying of certain cancers, though experts warn the study isn't strong enough to recommend healthy people start taking a pill that can cause bleeding and other problems.

To read the full article Aspirin May Reduce Cancer Risk, But Caution Urged, click here.


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Imagination Diet: Thinking About Eating Kills Cravings
Study: Habituate Your Mind to Treats and You Want Them Less


This holiday season, visions of sugar plums dancing in your head, or any other treats for that matter, may be the best way to ensure that you don't overindulge, according to new research from Carnegie Mellon University.

To read the full article Imagination Diet: Thinking About Eating Kills Cravings, click here.


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Older Men Get Less Effective Prostate Cancer Care

Old age is no hindrance to benefitting from prostate cancer surgery and radiation therapy, according to a new U.S. study that shows men over 75 often get less effective treatment than their younger peers.

To read the full article Older Men Get Less Effective Prostate Cancer Care, click here.


pinch130x100.jpgThe Best Ways to Lose Weight and Eat Healthfully in the New Year

It's resolution time again, and often the first resolution on most people’s lists is to lose weight and eat more healthfully. But how exactly do we do that and how do we keep ourselves from becoming a resolution dropout once Feb. 1 rolls around?

To read the full article The Best Ways to Lose Weight and Eat Healthfully in the New Year, click here.

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Two Cancer Codes Cracked

'We will think about cancers in a very different way's. Researchers have mapped the DNA mutations in skin and lung cancer — findings that one researcher says will change how cancer is viewed.


To read the full article Two Cancer Codes Cracked, click here.

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Why Women Wrinkle Around Mouth
Women More Likely Than Men to Get Wrinkles Around the Lips; Is Biology to Blame?


Biology may be the reason why women are more prone than men to developing wrinkles around the lips -- called perioral wrinkles-- and deeper ones, too, a new study says.

To read the full article Why Women Wrinkle Around Mouth, click here.

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A Device to De-Stress Your Workout

AFTER a night that included several beers and not enough sleep, Keith Gillis, a 31-year-old cyclist in Truro, Nova Scotia, set out on a 74-mile road ride with the caveat that he was feeling fatigued.

To read the full article A Device to De-Stress Your Workouts, click here.

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Study: Women Get More Wrinkles Than Men
Aesthetic Surgery Journal Finds Anatomical Differences in Male and Female Faces Make Women More Prone to Wrinkling


Mirror, mirror on the wall -- who has the most wrinkles of them all? According to a new study, men win the wrinkle war. Women wrinkle more easily.

To read the full article Women Get More Wrinkles Than Men , click here.


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From Genome to Hormones, Doctors Pick the Top Medical Advances of The Decade


The first decade of the 21st century brought a number of discoveries, mistakes and medical advances that influenced medicine from the patient's bedside to the medicine cabinet.

To read the full article The Top 10 Medical Advances of the Decade, click here.

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Antidepressants Change Personality

People who take anti-depressants may experience personality changes separate from the alleviation of their depressive symptoms.

To read the full article Antidepressants Change Personality , click here.

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Red wine or white? Which makes teeth a fright?
Health conscious (and vain) vino drinkers face cocktail conundrum


Monika Jones, 28, loves red wine. What she doesn’t love is the “monster mouth” it gives her. “I’ve found that red wine not only stains my teeth — it turns the inner part of my lips a dark magenta after just two glasses,” says Jones, a Seattle writer. “My friends call it ‘monster mouth.’”

To read the full article Red wine or white? Which makes teeth a fright?, click here.

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Does Dad Need A Nursing Home?
Dr. Jon LaPook Talks About The Tough Choice Of When To Send A Parent To A Nursing Home

One of the great blessings of my life is that my 91-year-old father, who I dearly love, lives in the apartment building next door. After 66 years of marriage, he's been living alone since my mother's death last March. He is still sharp as a tack, as he might say.

To read the full article Does Dad Need A Nursing Home?, click here.

Active ImageCDC Finds Uptick of salmonella Cases From Frogs, But Other Pets Can Infect, Too

Salmonella's back. Government officials announced this week that salmonella carried by your cute little green friends -- this time frogs -- have caused yet another outbreak in children. Aquatic pet frogs are under fire this week after 48 people in 25 states came down with salmonella serotype typhimurium, according to the U.S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

To read the full article Kiss a Frog and Get Salmonella?, click here.

Active ImageGeneral Mills' Pledge to Cut Sugar in Kids' Cereals Has Nutrition Experts Buzzing

The cereal giant General Mills has announced it will cut back the amount of sugar in 10 popular kids' cereals to single-digit grams of sugar per serving. As this move piqued the interest of nutritionists and other diet experts, the ABC News medical unit sent out a request for comment to some of the nation's top experts in the field.

To read the full article Experts Sound Off on Cereal, click here.

Active ImageTo PSA or Not to PSA, that is the Question

By Allen Lawrence, M.D.

In 2007, it is estimated that 218,890 men were diagnosed as having prostate cancer in the U.S. It is further estimated that 1out of every 6 men living in the U.S. will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during in his lifetime. In 2006, an estimated 27,350 men died from prostate cancer within the United States. The median age of death from prostate cancer from 2000 through 2004 was 80 years, and 71% of deaths occurred in men older than 75 years. African-American men have a substantially higher prostate cancer incidence rate than white men (217.5 vs. 134.5 cases per 100,000 men) and more than twice the prostate cancer mortality rate of white men (56.1 vs. 23.4 deaths per 100 000 men).

normalprostate-2.jpgStudies tell us that a substantial number of prostate cancer cases detected using current screening methods including PSA will never cause any symptoms during most of these patients’ lifetime. Modeling studies based on U.S. incidence data suggest that degree of prostate cancer is overdiagnosed in the ranging of between 29% and 44% of all prostate cancer cases detected by PSA screening. Because patients with this "pseudo-disease" receive no benefit from, and may be harmed by, prostate cancer screening and treatment, prostate cancer detection in this population constitutes an important potential burden.


PSA Testing, Yes or Now, The World is Waiting


Since the development of the PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) test the medical community has stressed that PSA testing was an important virtually mandatory on a yearly basis for men 50 to 70 years of age. For men over 70 years of age however, the criteria has not been as clear. In recent months with the release of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) update report on PSA, we may now have better answers for men 70 years of age or older.

normalprostate.jpgAfter review of many studies performed in the U.S. and abroad the USPSTF has updated their criteria published in August 2008 to more firmly suggest that while evidence is still unclear and inconclusive, evidence now appears to show that PSA testing in men over 75 years of age may lead to more harm than good. The issue is not so much the dangers of the test procedure itself, but rather the fact as one spokes person put it: “The PSA test is not a good test. We are not able to find quality evidence to find for or against the use of PSA testing for men 75 years of age or older.”

The issue is whether or not the PSA test is a good test and whether it can help the physician differentiate men who have prostate cancer and need treatment from those who have prostate cancer and do not need to be treated.

In the end, the question regarding PSA testing becomes, “Does PSA screening test lead to more benefit or more harm?” The USPSTF update report suggests that this is still unclear. An abnormal PSA inevitably leads to biopsy, biopsy, if positive for Prostate cancer, will inevitably lead to surgery or some other form of treatment. In most men over 75 years of age, the treatment of prostate cancer (whether actually is necessary or not) is associated with significant harm and for many of  men these harms and injuries will endure and cause problems for them for many years. All this may happen while treating a condition that most likely would never have caused them any significant ill effects during the remaining life time.

Abnormalprostate.jpgProstate cancer is the most common nonskin cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death among men in the United States. However, in men 75 years of age or older USPSTF suggests that “the absolute risk reduction associated with PSA screening was 0.71 deaths per 1000 men.”  This means that “1410 men would need to be screened and 48 cases of prostate cancer would need to be treated to prevent 1 death.” Stated differently, 47 of the 48 men treated because of an abnormal PAS would ultimately have to live with potential side effects and consequences from the treatment whether it us hormonal therapy, surgery, or radiation therapy. Complications from prostate treatment can and often do include impotency, erectile dysfunction, urinary incontinence, bowel dysfunction, chronic pain, and even death for a condition which if not treated most likely would have caused no problem to these men at all.

This does not also include the small harms such as pain and discomfort associated with prostate biopsy nor the psychological effects of false-positive test results which may affect hundreds of other men where cancer of the process is ultimately ruled out.

In men younger than age 75 years, the USPSTF claims that it still has found no significant evidence to determine whether treatment for prostate cancer after abnormal PSA screening improves health outcomes compared with treatment after clinical detection.

While the USPSTF concludes that for men younger than age 75 years, the benefits of screening for prostate cancer are uncertain and the balance of benefits and harms cannot be determined, for men 75 years or older, there is moderate certainty that the harms of PSA screening for prostate cancer outweigh the benefits.


Conclusion

In men younger than age 75 years, the USPSTF could not determine the degree of benefit from PSA screening for prostate cancer because of low certainty about the magnitude of benefits of screening and treatment.

Given the uncertainties and controversy surrounding prostate cancer screening in men younger than age 75 years, a clinician should not order the PSA test without first discussing with the patient the potential but uncertain benefits and the known harms of prostate cancer screening and treatment. Men should be informed of the gaps in the evidence and should be assisted in considering their personal preferences before deciding whether to be tested or not.

The USPSTF is now considering suggesting that men 75 years of age or older no longer be routinely screened with PSA testing. The risks, benefits and options should be routinely discussed with the patient and the decision left to the patient after understanding all of the facts involved in making this decision.

In each situation the patient should be instructed that current management strategies for localized prostate cancer can and do include watchful waiting (observation with palliative treatment for symptoms only), active surveillance (periodic monitoring with conversion to curative treatment for signs of disease progression), radical prostatectomy, external-beam radiation therapy, and brachytherapy (or radioactive seed implantation therapy) and rarely, hormonal suppression therapy.

Unless otherwise indicated in specific situations the USPSTF appears to be suggesting that “PSA screening as infrequently as every 4 years could yield as much of a benefit as annual screening.”

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Pallid parsnips and other colorless veggies may be overlooked but pack plenty of nutrition

Vibrantly colored vegetables often overshadow the paler varieties, which many people view as nutritional lightweights.

To read the full article Winter whites, click here.

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A little wine may boost heart-healthy omega-3s, A daily glass could affect how the body metabolizes fatty acids, study finds

A glass or two of wine per day may increase the amount of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids in a person's blood, a new study suggests.

To read the full article A little wine may boost heart-healthy omega-3s, click here.

Active ImageSurgery in the super old: Success at what price?
Advocates say age alone shouldn't exclude; critics worry about rising costs


At 102, Thelma Vette likes to whiz around her Littleton, Colo., retirement center in an electric wheelchair, bright red and outfitted with a joystick.

To read the full article Surgery in the super old: Success at what price?, click here.

Active ImageNew data: High-fructose corn syrup no worse than sugar

In 2004, three researchers published a paper in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggesting the rise in obesity might be linked to the rise in consumption of high-fructose corn syrup. The paper led to a wave of research and a chorus of popular concern over the cheap, ubiquitous liquid sweetener.

To read the full article High-fructose corn syrup no worse than sugar, click here.

Active ImageStudy Shows Lack Of Brain-Fueling Carbs Could Lead To Poorer Memory

Eliminating carbohydrates from your diet may help you lose weight, but it could leave you fuzzy headed and forgetful, a new study suggests.

To read the full article No-Carb Diets May Impair Memory, click here.

Active ImageStudy Shows Limitations Of Colonoscopies
Procedure's Effectiveness May Depend On Where In The Colon The Cancer Starts, New Research Finds


Colonoscopies have long been considered the gold standard for colorectal cancer screening - 90 percent effective in detecting the second leading cancer killer of men and women in this country.

To read the full article Study Shows Limitations Of Colonoscopies, click here.

Procedure's Effectiveness May Depend On Where In The Colon The Cancer Starts, New Research Finds

Colonoscopies have long been considered the gold standard for colorectal cancer screening - 90 percent effective in detecting the second leading cancer killer of men and women in this country.


To read the full article Study Shows Limitations Of Colonoscopies, click here.

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"Hooking-Up" Becoming More Common Than Traditional Dating, But What Does That Mean?

According to some studies, 75 percent of all college students have "hooked up," though that might not mean what you think it means. Still, whatever happened to good old fashioned dating?

To read the full article The Demise Of Dating, click here.

Active ImageIt's time to ditch that alarm clock, eat for energy and take a walk

In a perfect world, we would never need alarm clocks. Not only would we effortlessly conk out the moment our heads hit the pillow, our eyes would spontaneously open at the same time every day, and we would spring enthusiastically from our beds as chirping bluebirds alighted on our fingertips.

To read the full article A wake-up call for the sleep deprived, click here.

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CBS Evening News: As More Patients Turn To The Internet For A Second Opinion, How Do You Know What's Bogus?

When 45-year-old Melissa Offenhartz was diagnosed with breast cancer last May, she went straight to her computer, CBS News medical correspondent Dr. Jon LaPook reports.

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Controversial Report Says Up To 22 Percent Of Cases May Disappear Without Treatment

A significant portion of invasive breast cancers may regress on their own without treatment, a new study that is bound to provoke controversy suggests.

Active ImageIt's time to ditch that alarm clock, eat for energy and take a walk

In a perfect world, we would never need alarm clocks. Not only would we effortlessly conk out the moment our heads hit the pillow, our eyes would spontaneously open at the same time every day, and we would spring enthusiastically from our beds as chirping bluebirds alighted on our fingertips.

To read the full article A wake-up call for the sleep deprived, click here.


Active ImageNeurotic People Are More Stressed From Facing Uncertainty Than Facing Negative Feedback

Another day, another 400-point market sell-off or dismal jobs report or tax-payer-funded corporate bailout.

It goes without saying that we are living in uncertain times, and how you react to this uncertainty may say a lot about your mental health.

To read the full article Uncertainty Is Powerful Stress Producer , click here.

Active ImageHeart tests offered to many patients with chest pain are of little value in predicting future heart disease, say researchers.

Instead of electrocardiagram (ECG) tests, doctors should spend more time quizzing patients about their symptoms and examining them, they said.

To read the full article Heart test 'cannot predict risk', click here.

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On the Rise in Young People, These Tiny Stones Can Cause Excruciating Pain

Scott Nellis is barely old enough to get a driver's license but the 16-year-old from Lake City, Minn., has already had something most grown-ups have not -- three episodes of kidney stones.

Active ImageWalking may be just as good for your mind as it is for your body.

A new study from Italy finds people age 65 and older who regularly walk and do other kinds of moderate exercise seem to greatly lower their risk of vascular dementia
Active ImageNovel Solutions to Combat Holiday Weight Gain

"Did you get fatter again?" one of my clients told me she asked her husband as he put on a newly purchased pair of pants for the office.

Yes, some of us try to sneak new clothes in after the holidays so that others don't notice our latest indulgence in food. That can be one strategy.

To read the full article Worried About Holiday Weight Gain?, click here.



Active ImageDangerous Diabetes: Affliction of the Stars
From Oscar winners to an "American Idol" judge, Celebs Manage Diabetes


This has been quite a year for Halle Berry. Not only did the 41-year-old actress achieve a long desired pregnancy, but she stirred up a storm of controversy when she claimed that she had cured herself of type 1 diabetes -- a claim refuted by many doctors and the diabetes community. Berry is the latest example of the many stars, alive and dead, who have waged a battle with diabetes.

To read the full article Dangerous Diabetes: Affliction of the Stars, click here.